Dynamic Stretching – Series II Videos on Proper Form

This is the second of 3 series on Dynamic Stretch Videos Created by Emily Haglage, PT, DPT from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush

Research seems to lean towards dynamic stretching as the most beneficial form of stretching prior to any type of exercise or sport routine. In fact, most studies found that it was beneficial to perform dynamic stretching in order to reverse negative effects of static stretching. One researcher group discovered, “ Athletes in sports requiring [leg] power should use dynamic stretching techniques in warm-up to enhance flexibility while improving performance”.

Read more: To Stretch or Not To Stretch: Should you waste your time? and Dynamic Stretching – Series I Videos on Proper Form.


Dynamic Stretch 4: Hip Rotator stretches– use this exercise to open up your hips to allow for more movement as well as decreased risk of hip and low back strain.


Dynamic Stretch 5: Hip Rotator stretches– use this exercise to open up your hips to allow for more movement as well as decreased risk of hip and low back strain.


Dynamic Stretch 6: Hip Rotator stretches– use this exercise to open up your hips to allow for more movement as well as decreased risk of hip and low back strain.


Emily_Haglage.jpgEmily Haglage is a graduate of Saint Louis University where she received her bachelor’s of science degree in exercise science and doctorate in physical therapy. She treats a variety of orthopedic injuries with special interest in knee injuries including patellofemoral pain, meniscus injuries, ligamentous injuries, arthritis and post-operative total knee replacements. She enjoys working closely with athletes by performing Functional Sports Assessments (FSAs) which give physicians more assurance that their patients are safe to return to sports such as basketball, football, soccer, tennis and hockey.

Dynamic Stretching – Series I Videos on Proper Form

This is the first of 3 series on Dynamic Stretch Videos Created by Emily Haglage, PT, DPT from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush

Research seems to lean towards dynamic stretching as the most beneficial form of stretching prior to any type of exercise or sport routine. In fact, most studies found that it was beneficial to perform dynamic stretching in order to reverse negative effects of static stretching. One researcher group discovered, “ Athletes in sports requiring [leg] power should use dynamic stretching techniques in warm-up to enhance flexibility while improving performance”. Read more: To Stretch or Not To Stretch: Should you waste your time?


Dynamic Stretch: High Knees– use this exercise to stretch your psoas (hip flexor muscle) if you are dealing with any hip or low back issues.


Dynamic Stretch: Hamstring Walk– use this exercise to stretch your hamstrings dynamically especially if you have low back pain or frequent calf strains.

Dynamic Stretch: Glute Kicks– perform this exercise if you suffer from frequent quad strains or tight hips and knees

Emily_Haglage.jpgEmily Haglage is a graduate of Saint Louis University where she received her bachelor’s of science degree in exercise science and doctorate in physical therapy. She treats a variety of orthopedic injuries with special interest in knee injuries including patellofemoral pain, meniscus injuries, ligamentous injuries, arthritis and post-operative total knee replacements. She enjoys working closely with athletes by performing Functional Sports Assessments (FSAs) which give physicians more assurance that their patients are safe to return to sports such as basketball, football, soccer, tennis and hockey.


Patients’ Own Fat Tissue Can Help Treat Joint Problems

Doctors at Rush first in Chicago area to use treatment along with arthroscopic surgery


Body fat now can help treat bone joint conditions, including injuries and osteoarthritis — the type of arthritis caused by wear and tear in tissue between joints, which affects 27 million people. A new device gently suctions, processes and uses a patient’s own fat tissue to provide a potential source of stem cells and growth factors to promote healing.

Orthopedic physicians at Rush University Medical Center are the first sports medicine specialists in the Midwest to offer treatment with the device, called Lipogems, used at the time of arthroscopic surgery. The FDA approved Lipogems for widespread use in November of 2016.

“The technology is ideal for patients with certain orthopedic conditions, such as painful joints — including the knee, ankle or shoulder — with limited range of motion. Additionally, it can be used in soft tissue defects located in tendons, ligaments and/or muscles to improve the biologic environment,” said Dr. Brian Cole, professor of orthopedic surgery and section head of the Rush Cartilage Restoration Center at Rush University Medical Center.

“Fat has long been used for support of tissue repair and replacement,” Cole said. “Fat has the ability to be a source of important cells which produce important proteins involved with healing and reduction in inflammation.” The Lipogems system liposuctions fat cells from the abdomen or thigh while the patient is sedated with a local anesthetic.

The Lipogem procedure rinses and cleans inflammatory oils and blood from the harvested fat and keeps the natural and beneficial properties of the fat tissue, which is injected into the injured site. The entire procedure from harvesting to the injection is completed in less than 30 minutes.

The fat tissue tends to remain in the area where it is injected instead of being immediately reabsorbed by the body, allowing the body to maximize the benefits of the injection for an extended period of time. Following injection, the tissue promotes healing and symptom reduction as early as three weeks after treatment.

Lipogems treatment is at times used when standard treatment options such as physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or steroid injections have not provided significant relief. “It offers benefits for people who are unable to get surgery, would like an alternative to surgery, or it can be used in conjunction with their surgery,” Cole said.

In April, Cole became the first doctor in Chicago to use Lipogems in tandem with arthroscopic surgery, which he performed on a patient with knee arthritis. Cole says “while we were thoughtful about the timing of utilizing this technology to be sure there were no significant safety issues, we are anxious to now examine the efficacy of this novel treatment.”

Cole is also interested in implementing and studying the Lipogem procedure as an adjunct to other soft-tissue problems such as rotator cuff tears and tendon or ligament injury.

“We are excited to be offering this alternative to our patients and are conducting ongoing basic science and clinical research trials on patients with knee arthritis and other conditions to investigate the role of stem cells and growth factors that are present in the small blood vessels in fat.”


The Role of Regenerative Medicine Therapies in Pediatric/Adolescent Sports Injuries

American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) has just released a new call to action that outlines seven points for investigating the role of regenerative medicine therapies in pediatric and adolescent sports injuries. The collaborative study was developed from a meeting last August of sports medicine clinicians, researchers and a bioethicist to understand the current evidence risks and rewards and future directions of research and clinical practice for regenerative medicine therapies in youth sports. The meeting was supported by the National Youth Sports Health and Safety Institute (NYSHSI), a partnership between ACSM and Sanford Health, an integrated health system headquartered in the Dakotas.

“While regenerative medicine appears to have promise in many areas of medicine, little is known about the safety or effectiveness of these treatments for bone, cartilage, ligament or muscle tissue injuries in children and adolescents,” said Thomas Best, FACSM, professor of orthopedics, family medicine, biomedical engineering and kinesiology at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine. “Everyone wants a young athlete to get back to sports as quickly as possible, but it is important to look first at treatments that have been shown to be effective, before considering unproven options.”

Best was the lead author of a new collaborative study, “Not Missing the Future: A Call to Action for Investigating the Role of Regenerative Medicine Therapies in Pediatric/Adolescent Sports Injuries,” published May 15 in the American College of Sports Medicine’s Current Sports Medicine Reports.


“Unregulated clinics may sound attractive to parents and youngsters seeking aggressive regenerative therapy,” said Best, who is past president of ACSM. “But far more scientific research is necessary to determine if those treatments are helpful in overcoming sports injuries and, more importantly, without serious short- or long-term side effects.”


Seven-Point Call to Action:

1. Exercise caution in treating youth with cell-based therapies as research continues.

2. Improve regulatory oversight of these emerging therapies.

3. Expand governmental and private research funding.

4. Create a system of patient registries to gather treatment and outcomes data.

5. Develop a multi-year policy and outreach agenda to increase public awareness.

6. Build a multidisciplinary consortium to gather data and promote systematic regulation.

7. Develop and pursue a clear collective impact agenda to address the “hype” surrounding regenerative medicine.

Reflecting on the evidence, the study’s authors wrote, “Despite the media attention and perceived benefits of these therapies, there are still limited data as to efficacy and long-term safety. The involvement of clinicians, scientists and ethicists is essential in our quest for the truth.”

The Call to Action special communication is published in the May/June 2017 issue of ACSM’s Current Sports Medicine Reports (CSMR). As an official review journal of the American College of Sports Medicine, Current Sports Medicine Reports is unique in its focus entirely on the clinical aspects of sports medicine. It harnesses the tremendous scientific and clinical resources of ACSM to develop articles reviewing recent and important advances in the field that have clinical relevance. The journal’s goal is to translate the latest research and advances in the field into information physicians can use in caring for their patients.