The Emotional Impact of Injuries

emotional impact of injuries

Dr. Cole and Steve Kashul talk with Tara Hackney PT, DPT, OCS, KTTP, a physical therapist with Athletico. Tara earned her Orthopedic Clinical Specialty (OCS) certification due to an interest in orthopedic rehabilitation. She holds certifications in Graston Technique, Kinesiotape, and FMS testing.

As much as we would like to prevent injuries, they do occur. In an ideal world, an injury would not disrupt our regular activities or participation in sport. But many times injuries lead to shifts in our regular activities. For many athletes, this injury can trigger an emotional and mental response.

Emotional responses that can occur after injury:

  • Sadness
  • Isolation
  • Irritation
  • Lack of motivation
  • Anger
  • Frustration
  • Changes in appetite
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Disengagement

There is no correct way for an athlete to respond to an injury; every athlete is an individual and their response will vary. It is important to note that the emotional response to injury may change throughout the course of healing. It starts at the time of the injury but continues throughout rehab, and into the return-to-play phase as well. The healthcare team should be aware of emotional responses and be on the lookout for athletes who may not have proper coping to these intense emotions.

How Can We Help Injured Athletes Emotionally During Recovery?  (related article)

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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Discussion on Recent Injuries to Professional Athletes

Image result for trubisky shoulder injury

Dr. Brian Cole and Steve Kashul discuss recent professional sports injuries: Mitchell Trubisky’s shoulder injury, Redskins QB leg injuries and Markelle Fultz of the 76’ers who has missed the team’s last 27 games while rehabbing in California after being diagnosed with neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

After a two-year stretch of confusion, frustration, internet conspiracies, andWashington v Arizona unpredictability, Markelle Fultz, the Philadelphia 76ers’ 2017 No. 1 draft pick who suddenly couldn’t shoot a basketball, was finally diagnosed with thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS).

This ailment, often untraceable even by MRI, is the cause of Fultz’s inability to shoot a basketball properly from any distance. TOS is a very real, frustrating, and difficult-to-describe ailment. That may explain why it took so long to diagnose.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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Ask the Doctor!

This regular segment of ‘Ask the Doctor’ addresses questions submitted by Sports Medicine Weekly followers. Dr. Brian Cole from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush will be discussing:

  • Treating stiffness after total knee replacement when MUA and therapy have not worked.
  • Managing scar tissue after surgery.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

If you have a question to be addressed on an upcoming show, please click here to submit your question.

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Clinical Trial to Repair Articular Cartilage Defects of the Knee

Dr. Brian Cole talks with Chris Zlevor, a patient who experienced three knee surguries before participating in the Aesculap Novacart 3D Clinical Trial. This discussion covers the process of participation and followup experience as a patient in the study. Aesculap Biologics focuses on the manufacturing of tissue engineered products for the regeneration of diseased or damaged joint tissues.

A Phase 3 clinical trial is currently being conducted for NOVOCART 3D, a tissue engineered cell-based product designed to repair articular cartilage defects of the knee. If you believe you or your patients might qualify for one of our clinical trials or wish to be evaluated, please contact our research administrator, Kavita Ahuja, MD at (312) 563-2214 or kavita.ahuja@rushortho.com or inquire at your next visit.

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