Treatment and Prevention of Ankle Sprains

Running Injuries – Part Eight

Ankle sprains happen when there is turning, twisting, or rolling movement of the foot that stretches the ligament surrounding the ankle beyond their normal range, tearing them in the process, and leading to severe swelling and pain.

This is a very common injury. In fact, roughly 25,000 people sprain their ankles on a daily basis, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. And runners are not an exception.

Female runner suffering ankle sprained injury.Symptoms

Ankle sprains manifest as tender pain in the ankles—especially when you walk or run on the injured foot. Other symptoms of ankle sprains include bruising, skin discoloration, swelling and restricted range of motion in the whole ankle area.

Fix it

The standard RICE method works like a charm with this injury. If you are going an ankle sprain, then you need to R.I.C.E it for at least a couple of days before you do any weight-bearing activities like running. You can also wrap or compress the ankle with an Ace bandage to ease the inflammation and speed up recovery.

Of course, how long should you rest depends on the sprain’s severity, so if the injury lingers for more than two weeks, then you might need to a see a physician for a more thorough action plan. In most cases, your physician might recommend tapping the ankle, an air case or an ankle brace to speed up recovery and/or prevent re-injury as you slowly return back to your running routine.

Prevent it

Ankle sprains will usually heal in one to two weeks, but if you have a bad history of the condition (read: you sprain your ankles a lot), then there are a few things you need to do to prevent that from happening. To bullet-proof your body against ankle sprains, start doing balance exercises to strengthen the muscles around your ankles and build prioperception—the awareness of your own body in space.

Once the pain subsides and you can run pain-free, you might consider strengthening the muscles surrounding your ankle with balance training exercise such as xxx and yyy to improve ankle stability and prevent a flare-up—especially if you have a bad history of the condition.

By David Dack for Runners Blueprint

New Cartilage Transplant Technology; Rotator Cuff Tendonitis; Yoga and Why you Should Do It

Episode 16.25 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Dr. Vishal Mehta, an orthopedic surgeon who was on our show last year sharing his experience with ProChondrix, a fresh cartilage allograft from AlloSource. Dr. Mehta is back with us one year later to talk about the results he is seeing with the product and how his patients are doing. Dr. Mehta is a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine. ProChondrix® is a new treatment option for patients suffering from debilitating cartilage defects who do not want to give up their active lifestyle.

Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole discuss the causes, symtoms and treatment for rotator cuff tendonitis. Rotator cuff tendinitis, or tendonitis, affects the tendons and muscles that help move the shoulder joint. If you have tendinitis, it means that your tendons are inflamed or irritated. Rotator cuff tendinitis is also called impingement syndrome.

  1. Rotator cuff tendinitis, or tendonitis, occurs when the tendons and muscles thatRotator-Cuff-Tendonitis
    help move the shoulder joint are inflamed or irritated.
  2. It commonly occurs in people who play sports that frequently require extending the arm over the head.
  3. Most people with rotator cuff tendinitis can regain full function of the shoulder without any pain after treatment.

What Is Rotator Cuff Tendinitis?

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Segment Three: Yoga and Why you Should Do It by Alicia Molloy from ATI Physical yogaTherapy. “Yoga means different things to different people, but I think everyone that practices yoga has a story about how it has been beneficial to their health in at least one way. Flexibility and stress management/reduction are two benefits that people readily agree upon. However, both through my personal experiences as well as those of my students, I have seen yoga help people sleep better, eat better, and reduce their risk of injuries from other activities. I’ve had students alleviate back pain and reduce the frequency of their migraines. Yoga definitely isn’t <a panacea> to fix all ills and prevent diseases, but it does way more for your health than giving you Gumby-like flexibility.”

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WGN & Dr. Brian Cole: Donor cartilage keeping professional athletes in the game

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There is a transplant that keeps professional athletes in the game and works the same way to keep regular patients on their feet. For young adults not yet ready for joint replacement and who can’t go the distance living with debilitating pain, donor cartilage comes into play.

An intact, healthy piece of cartilage orthopedic surgeon Dr Brian Cole will transplant in his patient’s knee is about the size of a quarter. The procedure is called an osteochondral allograft. But before Dr Cole, professor orthopedic surgery at Rush University Medical Center, could do the surgery, he needed donor tissue.

Think of it like an organ donation.

“Someone who would otherwise donate their heart, liver and lungs also donate their cartilage,” Dr Cole said. “Typically they are very young donors. Most of them have died in traumatic accidents and things of that nature but we utilize their cartilage to treat local spots of arthritis.” Once the donor cartilage is tested and deemed safe for transplant – a process that takes about 14 days — the graft is pressed right into the defective area.

It’s not a new concept – and the surgical intervention is rare compared to the number of joint replacements performed annually. Still, with about 2500 to 3000 grafts performed each year, surgeons now have a larger collection of outcomes to consider. “We have about an 85% satisfaction rate with conditions that are lasting up to 10 to 12 years now,” Cole said.

That means the graft is often an effective bridging technique, particularly for a select group of patients with cartilage loss who are too young for total knee replacement. “When this goes well, we don’t worry about them going back to very high level activities,” Dr. Cole says. “No restrictions whatsoever, even professional sports. In contrast with metal and plastic that’s just not an option.”

She’s not be a professional athlete, but Kirstin Kent’s knee once threatened her career in the same way. On her feet for long shifts at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Chicago, the constant pain limited her ability to do the job she loves.

“It was really hard. At work I wouldn’t be able to move around much. I pretty much was stuck in my office and I would try to do as much as I could but I kept telling people, ‘I’m not lazy, I’m just in so much pain I can’t really move around,’” she said. “I wasn’t able to help other co-workers with their tasks for the day, and I would really limit where I would go. I wouldn’t go grocery shopping at night. I wouldn’t be able to go out and do anything. I would just basically sit at home because I was in so much pain.”

“She had an area of cartilage loss behind her knee cap where the bone was exposed and then the groove that the knee cap tracks in was also had exposed bone,” said Dr Cole.  “We took this donor’s patella and transplanted it into her knee and then the same thing for the groove that the knee tracks in.” It was a calculated risk.  Kirstin was nearly too old for the allograft. The transplant works best on younger patients who don’t have the arthritic changes and degenerative disease that often come with age.

But Kirstin and Dr Cole were willing to take a chance.

“What we’re learning is if we push the envelope many of these patients can also be helped with the same technology we also apply to our other age groups,” Dr Cole said. “I was told that I was too young to get a knee replacement and that I would need too many revisions down the road,” Kirstin said. “So really this was my last option. I feel really, really good. I keep saying I never thought that I would see this day.”

Unlike an organ transplant cartilage transplant patients don’t need to take anti-rejection drugs. Recovery takes about 3 to 6 months – with most patients back to full activity after 8 months.

More information at Rush’s Cartilage Restoration Center

AlloSource to Highlight Early Findings of ProChondrix Cartilage Restoration Matrix at International Cartilage Repair Society Symposia

AlloSource will share early results of its fresh cartilage allograft, ProChondrix®, duringAllo_ESPN_skysc-banner_160x600_04-16 the International Cartilage Repair Society’s (ICRS) 13th World Congress in Sorrento-Naples Italy.  The Industry Satellite Lunch Symposia will take place on Monday, 26 September 2016 from 13:00 to 13:30 in the Sala Nettuna Room.

Vishal Mehta, M.D., orthopedic surgeon from Fox Valley Orthopedics in Geneva, Illinois, will present early results of ProChondrix transplantation on isolated articular cartilage defects.  Patients underwent treatment of an isolated, symptomatic articular cartilage surface lesion, which was treated with microfracture and placement of a ProChondrix graft.  The 12-month review post-treatment demonstrated early success and no failures.  In addition to Dr. Metha, Laurie Goodrich, D.V.M, Ph. D., associate professor in equine surgery and lameness at Colorado State University, will share the findings of a 12-month horse study.

AlloSource will also present several posters at ICRS.  One will focus on Dr. Mehta’s 12-month clinical results, another highlights Dr. Goodrich’s equine study findings, both previously mentioned, and another poster shares results from an internal study on ProChondrix’s likeness to healthy adult cartilage.

For more information on ProChondrix and the recently launched Reimbursement Hotline dedicated to assisting customers and providing information on coding options, coverage access and reimbursement, please visit ProChondrix.org.

AlloSource will share early results of its fresh cartilage allograft, ProChondrix®, during the International Cartilage Repair Society’s (ICRS) 13th World Congress in Sorrento-Naples Italy.  The Industry Satellite Lunch Symposia will take place on Monday, 26 September 2016 from 13:00 to 13:30 in the Sala Nettuna Room.

Vishal Mehta, M.D., orthopedic surgeon from Fox Valley Orthopedics in Geneva, Illinois, will present early results of ProChondrix transplantation on isolated articular cartilage defects.  Patients underwent treatment of an isolated, symptomatic articular cartilage surface lesion, which was treated with microfracture and placement of a ProChondrix graft.  The 12-month review post-treatment demonstrated early success and no failures.  In addition to Dr. Metha, Laurie Goodrich, D.V.M, Ph. D., associate professor in equine surgery and lameness at Colorado State University, will share the findings of a 12-month horse study.

AlloSource will also present several posters at ICRS.  One will focus on Dr. Mehta’s 12-month clinical results, another highlights Dr. Goodrich’s equine study findings, both previously mentioned, and another poster shares results from an internal study on ProChondrix’s likeness to healthy adult cartilage.

For more information on ProChondrix and the recently launched Reimbursement Hotline dedicated to assisting customers and providing information on coding options, coverage access and reimbursement, please visit ProChondrix.org.

The Chicago Sports Summit; Director of Sports Performance for The Chicago Bulls; Marathon Injuries

Episode 16.24 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Dr. Cole and Steve discuss the upcoming Chicago Sports Summit to be held at The Hyatt Regency on October 5th. Chicago leaders will join forces during the first-ever Chicago Sports Summit, a forum about the fast-changing world of sports and issues that will affect the future of the industry in Chicago.

Chicago Sports Summit

The powerful line-up of experts will tackle issues, such as owning and managing teams; building fans and staying profitable; player contracts and injuries; the changing world of college sports and keeping young athletes engaged in sports.

Net proceeds benefit After School MattersAfter School Matters logo

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Register today for Chicago’s premier sports event of the year. All attendees will receive a goody bag with team memorabilia and Chicago-style sweets. See list of Speakers, Emcees and Agenda.


Segment Two: Chip Schaefer talks about the early days at the Chicago Stadium and schaeferthe biggest changes over the years in the players, training, injury management and new technology. A veteran in the athletic training and sports performance fields, Schaefer returns to Chicago for a second stint with the Bulls having served as the team’s Head Athletic Trainer from 1990-98. Schaefer’s new role with the Bulls will be to implement and integrate a multi-disciplined staff that bridges the sports medicine and sports performance programs.

He will oversee athletic training, strength and conditioning, sport psychology and player nutrition. The 2016-17 campaign will mark his 25th season in the NBA, during which time he has contributed to 11 NBA Championship teams (six with Chicago, five with the Los Angeles Lakers). Most recently, he spent the last three seasons with the Sacramento Kings as the team’s Director of Sports Science. While with the Kings, he assisted the sports medicine and athletic training staffs with injury prevention and health maintenance.

He also created and implemented the team’s strength and conditioning programs. Following his first term in Chicago, he worked 13 seasons with the Lakers (1986-87, 1999-2011). In his last seven seasons in Los Angeles, he was the team’s Director of Athletic Performance/Player Development; while with the Lakers, he also oversaw the transition of the team’s young players into the NBA, as well as their professional development.


Segment Three: With the upcoming Chicago Marathon, Dr. Cole sees a variety of running injuries and discusses sudden injuries in the hip-groin area, foot and ankle injuries, runners knee tibia and stress fractures; signs and diagnosis, when to stop training, when to take action, overuse and recovery; how to prevent more serious injury.