AlloSource to Highlight Early Findings of ProChondrix Cartilage Restoration Matrix at International Cartilage Repair Society Symposia

AlloSource will share early results of its fresh cartilage allograft, ProChondrix®, duringAllo_ESPN_skysc-banner_160x600_04-16 the International Cartilage Repair Society’s (ICRS) 13th World Congress in Sorrento-Naples Italy.  The Industry Satellite Lunch Symposia will take place on Monday, 26 September 2016 from 13:00 to 13:30 in the Sala Nettuna Room.

Vishal Mehta, M.D., orthopedic surgeon from Fox Valley Orthopedics in Geneva, Illinois, will present early results of ProChondrix transplantation on isolated articular cartilage defects.  Patients underwent treatment of an isolated, symptomatic articular cartilage surface lesion, which was treated with microfracture and placement of a ProChondrix graft.  The 12-month review post-treatment demonstrated early success and no failures.  In addition to Dr. Metha, Laurie Goodrich, D.V.M, Ph. D., associate professor in equine surgery and lameness at Colorado State University, will share the findings of a 12-month horse study.

AlloSource will also present several posters at ICRS.  One will focus on Dr. Mehta’s 12-month clinical results, another highlights Dr. Goodrich’s equine study findings, both previously mentioned, and another poster shares results from an internal study on ProChondrix’s likeness to healthy adult cartilage.

For more information on ProChondrix and the recently launched Reimbursement Hotline dedicated to assisting customers and providing information on coding options, coverage access and reimbursement, please visit ProChondrix.org.

AlloSource will share early results of its fresh cartilage allograft, ProChondrix®, during the International Cartilage Repair Society’s (ICRS) 13th World Congress in Sorrento-Naples Italy.  The Industry Satellite Lunch Symposia will take place on Monday, 26 September 2016 from 13:00 to 13:30 in the Sala Nettuna Room.

Vishal Mehta, M.D., orthopedic surgeon from Fox Valley Orthopedics in Geneva, Illinois, will present early results of ProChondrix transplantation on isolated articular cartilage defects.  Patients underwent treatment of an isolated, symptomatic articular cartilage surface lesion, which was treated with microfracture and placement of a ProChondrix graft.  The 12-month review post-treatment demonstrated early success and no failures.  In addition to Dr. Metha, Laurie Goodrich, D.V.M, Ph. D., associate professor in equine surgery and lameness at Colorado State University, will share the findings of a 12-month horse study.

AlloSource will also present several posters at ICRS.  One will focus on Dr. Mehta’s 12-month clinical results, another highlights Dr. Goodrich’s equine study findings, both previously mentioned, and another poster shares results from an internal study on ProChondrix’s likeness to healthy adult cartilage.

For more information on ProChondrix and the recently launched Reimbursement Hotline dedicated to assisting customers and providing information on coding options, coverage access and reimbursement, please visit ProChondrix.org.

The Chicago Sports Summit; Director of Sports Performance for The Chicago Bulls; Marathon Injuries

Episode 16.24 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Dr. Cole and Steve discuss the upcoming Chicago Sports Summit to be held at The Hyatt Regency on October 5th. Chicago leaders will join forces during the first-ever Chicago Sports Summit, a forum about the fast-changing world of sports and issues that will affect the future of the industry in Chicago.

Chicago Sports Summit

The powerful line-up of experts will tackle issues, such as owning and managing teams; building fans and staying profitable; player contracts and injuries; the changing world of college sports and keeping young athletes engaged in sports.

Net proceeds benefit After School MattersAfter School Matters logo

mor athletico

Register today for Chicago’s premier sports event of the year. All attendees will receive a goody bag with team memorabilia and Chicago-style sweets. See list of Speakers, Emcees and Agenda.


Segment Two: Chip Schaefer talks about the early days at the Chicago Stadium and schaeferthe biggest changes over the years in the players, training, injury management and new technology. A veteran in the athletic training and sports performance fields, Schaefer returns to Chicago for a second stint with the Bulls having served as the team’s Head Athletic Trainer from 1990-98. Schaefer’s new role with the Bulls will be to implement and integrate a multi-disciplined staff that bridges the sports medicine and sports performance programs.

He will oversee athletic training, strength and conditioning, sport psychology and player nutrition. The 2016-17 campaign will mark his 25th season in the NBA, during which time he has contributed to 11 NBA Championship teams (six with Chicago, five with the Los Angeles Lakers). Most recently, he spent the last three seasons with the Sacramento Kings as the team’s Director of Sports Science. While with the Kings, he assisted the sports medicine and athletic training staffs with injury prevention and health maintenance.

He also created and implemented the team’s strength and conditioning programs. Following his first term in Chicago, he worked 13 seasons with the Lakers (1986-87, 1999-2011). In his last seven seasons in Los Angeles, he was the team’s Director of Athletic Performance/Player Development; while with the Lakers, he also oversaw the transition of the team’s young players into the NBA, as well as their professional development.


Segment Three: With the upcoming Chicago Marathon, Dr. Cole sees a variety of running injuries and discusses sudden injuries in the hip-groin area, foot and ankle injuries, runners knee tibia and stress fractures; signs and diagnosis, when to stop training, when to take action, overuse and recovery; how to prevent more serious injury.

Baseball and Softball: Pain After Pitching

By Paul Kohler, MS, OTR/L, CHT for Athletico

Baseball and Softball: Pain after PitchingTypes of pain and treatment options for athletes

Some discomfort in the throwing arm is common after a pitching session. After all, consistent overhead throwing is hard on the shoulder and elbow. But what is normal discomfort? What pains should be concerning to baseball/softball athletes? What pains should be examined by a professional? Find out more with the guide below:

Acceptable Discomfort

Discomfort described as soreness that spreads around the entire shoulder, and/or in muscles such as the biceps, triceps and forearm is to be expected. Oftentimes, pitchers will experience discomfort in their arm a day or two after throwing in a game.

To assist with the pain, athletes can consult their athletic trainer or physician. Oftentimes ice or over-the-counter anti-inflammatories are the recommendation. That said, the pain should subside on its own and discomfort should not be present for the pitcher’s next outing. If the pain continues, the athlete should consider scheduling a complimentary injury screen at their nearest Athletico location.

Concerning Pain

Pitchers should pay close attention to pain in specific areas of their shoulder or elbow. This is because pain in specific areas may indicate tissue breakdown and lead to a significant injury.

Pain in the elbow, for example, is concerning because of the lack of muscles crossing over this joint to provide stability. Instead, the elbow relies on its bone to bone anatomy and ligamentous structure. This means that pain in the elbow may signify some kind of irritation to the bones or ligaments, such as the ulnar collateral ligament (a.k.a Tommy John). Overuse of the throwing arm via high pitch counts and lack of rest, as well as improper throwing mechanics are usually the causes behind specific elbow and shoulder pain.

To assist with the pain, baseball and softball players can consult their athletic trainer or physician to see if treatment options like ice or over-the-counter anti-inflammatories are recommended. Athletes should also get plenty of rest. In fact, athletes should rest until throwing and/or pitching is pain free in order to avoid further injury.

Another treatment option for pain in the elbow or shoulder is to work with an Athletico overhead throwing specialist. Through a detailed history, and/or video throwing analysis, an Athletico specialist will differentiate between pain caused from overthrowing, mechanics or both. From there, an individualized treatment plan will be developed, with the goal of returning the athlete to the field pain free.

Injury Pain

Pain that significantly alters a pitcher’s performance, changes their mechanics, and does not go away with the before mentioned conservative measures (rest, ice, anti-inflammatories, mechanical adjustments) may indicate a significant injury has occurred.  Tears in the shoulder labrum, rotator cuff, elbow UCL, and avulsion fractures of the medial epicondyle are a few examples of injuries that significantly interfere with a pitcher’s performance. Diagnosing injuries of this magnitude most often will require the expertise of an orthopedic specialist. Treatment for these injuries may be as simple as a few bouts of physical/occupational therapy, or as complex as a surgical procedure with a lengthy recovery. That is why it is so important to be preventative when you start noticing the pains outlined above.

Better Safe than Sorry

Some discomfort in the throwing arm is common for pitchers, but every athlete is different. This is why it is important for each athlete to pay attention to their body and give themselves enough rest to recover from the wear and tear that occurs in practices and games. Moreover, if the pain doesn’t seem to be subsiding or is getting worse, it is a good idea to take the next step and contact Athletico Physical Therapy for a complimentary injury screening.

Click to Schedule a Complimentary Injury Screen

Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet; Stem Cell Therapy: Myths and Misconceptions; Treatment and Prevention of “Text Neck”

Episode 16.23 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Certified Integrated Health Coach, Karen Malkin discusses the health med-dietbenefits of the Mediterranean Diet.  This anti-inflammatory diet promoted by Andrew Weil, MD, helps counteract chronic inflammation, and prevent age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Health benefits of an anti-inflammatory diet include lower LDL and total cholesterol and long-term weight loss without calorie counting. Key foods on the Mediterranean diet include 5-9 servings each day of phytonutrient containing vegetables and fruit and cooked Asian mushrooms to support immune function.

The anti-inflammatory food plan encourages fiber- rich beans and legumes; fish loaded in Omega 3’s such as wild salmon; whole soy foods such as tofu, tempeh; healthy fats such as olive oil, nuts, seeds, ground flax seed and avocados.  Of course, we can’t forget a small amount of dark chocolate and red wine, plus 2-4 cups of green tea each day, all loaded with antioxidants.


Segment Two: Dr. Cole discusses stem cell therapy and its use for elite athletes andstem-cell
the weekend warrior; definition, benefits, myths and misconceptions; the procedure and current research.

Manipulating stem cells from a patient’s bone marrow near the site of the defect in order to encourage cartilage growth and regeneration is an approach that could potentially be used to avoid surgical intervention.

Ongoing clinical trials and research efforts


Segment Three: Megan Randich, PT, DPT, ATC, Cert. MDT and Facility Manager from Athletico discusses “Text Neck”: Causes, symptoms, treatment and prevention.

"Text neck"

More teens than ever are complaining of “text neck,” or back and neck pain that can only be explained by the strain on the body caused by constant viewing of hand-held technology.

“We have teens experiencing the same shoulder, neck and back pain usually felt by people 30 years older,” said Megan Randich, a physical therapist and facility manager for Athletico in Westchester. “They shouldn’t be experiencing those issues.”

Randich said spine specialists also are seeing evidence of strain from cellphone, tablet and laptop use in high school athletes who complain that they don’t have the normal range of motion — or feel pain when trying to throw a baseball, strike a football stance or perform in other sporting activities.

More on ‘Text Neck’ article with Megan Randich plus video

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Multiple Lower Extremity Stress Fractures

How common is it to get more than one stress fracture on one bone? For example, having a stress fracture mid calf on tibia and then getting one lower tibia near ankle and medial malleolus.

Dr. GhannadDr. Leda A. Ghannad:

Pediatric & Adult Sports Medicine, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Orthopedic Physician
Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush

Stress fractures in the lower extremities (i.e. pelvis, thigh, legs and feet) are common in athletes who participate in repetitive high impact activities such as running and jumping. Studies have found stress fracture rates as high as 20% in competitive track and field athletes and 13% in elite tennis players.

There isn’t as much data available regarding how common recurrent stress fractures are in the same bone, however most sports medicine physicians consider a history of more than one stress fracture concerning and a reason for further workup. This first involves identifying any training errors such as increasing activity intensity too quickly, improper shoe wear, or abnormal running mechanics.

Treatment Options:
A nutritional evaluation by a sports nutritionist may also be recommended. Oftentimesstress-fracture athletes think they are eating a healthy diet, but may not be taking in enough calories for the amount of exercise they are participating in. In female athletes this often leads to changes in hormone levels and irregularities in the menstrual cycle that can negatively affect bone health.

Your physician may also consider ordering a DEXA scan to evaluate your overall bone density, blood work including vitamin D levels, and urine tests to look for an abnormal loss of calcium in the urine that runs in some families. These tests are relatively easy to perform and can often help identify treatable risk factors for stress fractures.

If you have been diagnosed with more than one stress fracture it is important to meet with a sports medicine physician to help identify and treat any risk factors that can prevent future injury.