LIFETIME Opening Fall 2018 in Northbrook IL

Life Time will soon open its doors to share the healthy way of life within your community. Be one of the first to join us.

Exceptional Spaces

From our fitness floor and pool to our studios, every space is designed to inspire and energize. Whether you need to de-stress or pump up, you’ll find the space and the equipment you need to do it right.

The Hottest Classes

Move your body and lift your spirits with classes that deliver all-out intensity, restorative meditation and everything in between. Build muscle, learn new skills and improve your health in a supportive, fun-loving community.

Passionate Performers

3 top Life Time performers

We’re here to motivate, encourage and teach you with some of the best trainers and fitness instructors in the industry. Ask questions. Make us challenge you. Laugh with us. We’ll share the joy, passion and knowledge we have for a healthy way of life as we build relationships with you.

More Than a Workout

Discover new ways to love your life with Life Time. Have more fun. Discover a new passion. Reinvent family time. Make new friends. Do it all here.


Become a Founding Member by September 30 and Receive

Discounted Joining Fees: Save over $50 when you get started prior to the Grand Opening.


Exclusive Gear: Show off your Founding status with a limited-edition gear bag and water bottle.


Additional Benefits: Founding Members receive an onboarding Personal Training Session and $100 in complimentary fitness, nutrition, and spa services. Plus, kids age 11 and under receive a kids academy shirt and tumbler, plus one month free of group swim lessons.


Grand Opening Invite: Be among the first to see and experience the club during our Grand Opening celebration. Learn more here>>

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Youth Pitching Study: The Effect of a Strengthening Program

Image result for core strengthening exercises

WHAT IS THE STUDY?

This study is examining the effect of a 6-week hip and core strengthening program on shoulder and elbow motion during pitching. Participants are 13-18 years old who pitch in at least one game per week on average during the season. Players will either be assigned to the control group or the strengthening program group. In the strengthening group, players will be taught a hip and core strengthening program and will be expected to complete it daily for 6 weeks. In the control group, players will continue to train as they were before enrolling in the study.

WHY HIP AND CORE STRENGTHENING?

The forces generated by the hip muscles during throwing are vital to the initiation and transfer of power to the arm. Electromyography (EMG) has shown that the legs and trunk provide rotational momentum for the arm and create over 50% of the total force and kinetic energy in a tennis serve. Other studies have shown that as a game progresses, players first show fatigue in their hip and core muscles and then lose their correct pitching form. In order to keep the same speed of their pitch while tired, players often use poor form and place themselves at risk for injury. We hope that using this conditioning program will strengthen the hip and core muscles and allow pitchers to continue pitching with proper form, therefore decreasing injuries.

WHAT WILL THE PLAYER BE EXPECTED TO DO?

When the player and parents decide to participate, the player will have baseline measurements taken, including hip range of motion, hip strength and the single leg squat test. Next, players will pitch while there are 1-inch markers attached to their arms and legs, which help us track body movements. If assigned to the strengthening group, players will be instructed on the proper completion of 10 exercises and will be instructed to do these daily before their regular practice sessions for 6 weeks. The program takes 10-15 minutes to complete. Players will also fill out a weekly compliance log of how often they do the exercises. The same tests will be repeated after the player has finished the 6 week program and then again after 6 months.

WHERE WILL THE TESTING TAKE PLACE?

The testing will take place at the new Rush University Medical Center Sports Training Facility in Oak Brook, IL.  If you believe you or your patients might qualify for one of our clinical trials or wish to be evaluated, please contact our research administrator, Kavita Ahuja, MD at (312) 563-2214 or kavita.ahuja@rushortho.com.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS AND BENEFITS?

There is minimal risk associated with participating. Risks include injury from pitching, muscle soreness or discomfort associated with completing the hip and core strengthening program. Potential benefits include improvement in the players’ pitching mechanics and/or velocity. However, that result cannot be guaranteed.

Research Graphic

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Chicago’s Greatest Sports Event of the Year

Chicago Sports Summit

The 3rd Annual Chicago Sports Summit is a half-day event featuring heavy hitters in sports. Female Olympic athletes will speak about breaking barriers and the #MeToo movement; general managers of Chicago’s pro teams will discuss secrets to navigating up and down seasons; former NFL and NHL hockey players will expose the prevalence of injuries like concussion.

Chicago Sports Summit 2018 - Wed., Oct. 3, 2018

Get Tickets Now!

Our panelists this year will be discussing the following topics, and many more:

Women in Sports: Hear from some of the most influential women who are breaking down barriers in the world of sports.

The Team Behind the Team: Experience how sports and health experts help athletes get back in the game.

A View From the Top: A perspective on Chicago’s professional sports teams from their own front office executives

Chicago’s All-Stars: Hear from some of Chicago’s very own past and present sports stars.

Click here to see MODERATORS & PANELISTS

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Is Toe-Walking an Early Sign of a Health Condition?

By Brian Rog with Contributions by: Annie Kender, PT, DPT, C/NDT of the ATI Grand Blanc, Mich., Clinic

Is Toe-Walking an Early Sign of a Health Condition?

When a child learns to walk, instinctively, he or she will begin walking with their feet flat on the ground. But because this is a skill that takes much practice, it’s not uncommon for them to transition on and off their tip toes as their walking abilities develop.

Some children begin walking on their toes for stability, others walk on their toes for sensory reasons – these children sometimes have difficulty tolerating pressure through their heels or they prefer the sensations (or proprioceptive input) they received from their joints locking out. Children may also walk on their toes due to range of motion restrictions in their calf muscles (gastrocs).

As your child’s coordination and muscles develop, they will begin walking with a heel-toe pattern; on average around 18 months of age. However, should those heels remain ascended beyond age 2-3 as your child’s only means of getting around, this may be an early sign of a neurological condition (Cerebral Palsy, Spina Bifida, Tethered cord, etc.). Conversely research reports 7-24 percent of children who walk on their tip-toes are idiopathic toe walkers, meaning they do not have a correlated disgnosis such as Cerebral Palsy.

When to see a specialist

Research supports the idea that heel strike in children begins around 22 weeks following initial onset of walking independently. For the majority of children, this occurs around 18 months of age. Toe walking is not considered a normal part of this early independent gait. As we mentioned, if by age 2, your child hasn’t outgrown toe walking, this may be an indication of neurological immaturity or muscle weakness.

To that, ATI Physical Therapy experts suggest consulting with your pediatrician, because if left untreated, toe-walking can put your child at further risk for contractures, foot deformities and balance deficits. And in severe cases, your child may require surgical interventions if deformities or contractures are advanced. Fortunately, physical therapy interventions are an effective way to help your child overcome this.

Long-term effects of toe walking, if left untreated

As you can imagine, toe-walking places a great load on the muscles and tendons. Many children who consistently walk on their tip-toes since establishing independent ambulation, may develop foot deformities as early as the age of four. These children may demonstrate ankle range of motion restrictions, impaired balance and poor postural alignment.

Physical therapy for toe walking

Therapeutic treatment such as physical therapy can assist your child in achieving a heel-toe gait pattern as well as correcting any range of motion restrictions, muscle imbalances and postural deformities.  After identifying the child’s origin for toe-walking, a plan of care is established to address the child’s deficits. Treatment methods typically include stretching, strengthening of lower extremities and core, balance retraining, sensory integration techniques, serial casting, orthotic training and a home exercise program.

After completing physical therapy, what’s next?

Once your child has successfully completed their PT treatment, you will receive a home exercise program to further continue their treatment plan at home.

For children with an established heel-to-toe pattern, who no longer demonstrate weakness or range of motion restrictions, their home program is minimal. For children with neurological conditions as an underlying source of their toe-walking, they may require intermittent services over their lifetime to maintain gains, usually around growth spurts.

Is your child toe-walking? ATI may be able to help

If you are concerned about your child’s toe-walking tendencies, we first suggest connecting with your pediatrician to determine the next course of action. Should physical therapy be required, please don’t hesitate to contact your your nearest ATI physical therapy clinic to see what pediatric therapy options are available for your child.

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