Donor Family Shares Story of Hope; Zach Miller Knee Injury; Cheerleader Injuries

Episode 17.30 Rerun

Segment One (01:30): The Healing Process of Donor Parents Lori and Rob Chana.

Cameron Chana (2)Cameron Chana was a born leader who focused on making an impact in lives of others. He was very involved in volunteer work, his church, and went on mission trips across the world. No matter where he was, he encouraged positivity and spread his caring, upbeat energy.

The Chana family’s world was turned upside down when twenty-two-year old Cameron was killed in a bus accident in 2009. During a time of unimaginable grief, his parents and three siblings honored his wish to be a donor.

Cameron’s legacy of hope and love lives on through the gift of organ and tissue donation. He saved five lives through organ donation and impacted as many as 50 lives through tissue donation. Learn more at AllowSource.

Lori & Rob Chana with Steve and Dr. Cole

Chana family with Cameron on the Left

Cameron’s heart recipient


Segment Two (14.12): Steve and Dr. Cole talk with former Chicago Bear Otis WilsonUSP NFL: CHICAGO BEARS AT NEW ORLEANS SAINTS S FBN NO CHI USA LA about Zach Millers horrific knee injury in the recent game against the New Orleans Saints. Chicago Bears Zach Miller had emergency surgery last week to repair a torn popliteal artery in his left leg, an injury that has resulted in amputation in some previous instances involving other football players. The 33-year-old dislocated his left knee while trying to catch a touchdown pass, which subsequently damaged the artery.


Segment Three (21:04): Dr. Kathy Weber from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talksabout the prevalence of catastrophic injuries and concussions in cheerleaders. Cheerleading is by far the most perilous sport for female athletes in high school and college, accounting for as much as two-thirds of severe school-sports injuries over the past 25 years, according to a new report. Yet cheerleading remains one of the least-regulated sports, despite more than 95,000 high school girls and 2,000 boys signing up for spirit squads nationwide each year.


kathleen weberDr. Weber’s reputation as a leading sports medicine physician is enhanced by her remarkable activity in the treatment of high-level professional athletes. She serves as the head primary care sports medicine team physician for the Chicago Bulls and the Chicago White Sox and the head team physician for the Chicago Force Women’s Football. She also serves as co-head team physician for the DePaul Blue Demons and the physician for the Hubbard Street Dance and the River North Dance Companies. In addition, she is a member of the LPGA Medical Advisory Board. She is on numerous committees including the NBA Team Physicians Executive Committee, NBA Research Committee, MLB Concussion Committee, and MLB Research Committee. Dr. Weber has been involved with the MLB Medical Advisory Board for multiple years and is the first women elected President of the MLB Team Physicians Association.

Self-Love and Your Health

By Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling 

It’s easy to get swept up in all things love. But do you ever really think about love in the context of yourself? If not, it’s time to get selfish, because the love you show yourself is the greatest form of self-care and also what will keep you healthy (and happy) in the long run.

The benefits of this form of self-care or self-compassion are clear. According to Emma Seppala, Ph.D., Associate Director of Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism, making the effort to nourish your body, mind, and soul with love can lead to:

  • increased inner strength,
  • increased productivity,
  • and decreased stress.

In addition, research out of Wake Forest University about the effects of self-compassion on eating habits shows that women who gave themselves permission to occasionally indulge were less likely to overeat than those who relentlessly beat themselves up over any indulgence.

It may seem frivolous, but self-care is not something to take lightly. You can reap the wellness benefits by focusing on yourself in these important ways:

Love Yourself — Start by being less critical of yourself. Silence the inner voice in your head that tells you are not good enough… smart enough… rich enough… thin enough…. Become aware of when your inner voice launches into her harsh critique, and try to reframe the dialogue so that it’s more caring. This will take some time, but the goal is for that voice to be as loving as it would be if you were talking with a dear friend.

Takeaway: You don’t have to love your extra weight, but you need to love the person who has the extra weight.

Feed Yourself — An important physical form of nourishment comes from the foods you choose to feed your body. A loving attitude towards yourself makes you want to fill your plate with that which make you feel energized and clear-headed (whole foods, organic fruit and vegetables, and healthy fats) as opposed to that which leave you feeling drained, spacey, and hungry for more (fast food, processed food, and fried food). Something as simple as staying properly hydrated can be a powerful signal to your body that you care.

Takeaway: Filling your tank with healthful whole foods is a radical form of self-love.

Time for Yourself — Are you are a mom juggling the needs of your family? Or are you a busy executive, giving 110% to your job? Or maybe both of these roles fit? If so, one of the most important things you can do is carve out time each week for you—and you alone. That means that during that timeframe, everyone else’s needs take a backseat to yours. Whether you schedule a massage, sink into a great book, take a walk with a friend, or simply do nothing, you’ll find that prioritizing yourself in this way provides the perfect opportunity to recharge your batteries.

Takeaway: You show up in the world in a much more meaningful way when you take time to prioritize yourself.

When it comes to taking time for yourself, I invite you to join our 14 Day Transformation Cleanse, which features two full weeks of eating nourishing whole foods as well as wellness supplies and direct support from me. During that time, you can expect to feel more energetic, mentally clear, better able to sleep, and more! Why not give yourself the ultimate gift of self-love? Sign up today here.

To your good health,

Karen

MORE NEWS – EXPANDING MY REACH

As many of you may know, earlier this year, I joined the board of the Environmental Working Group (EWG). I couldn’t be more proud of the work we’re undertaking. As a consumer advocacy group focusing on (and fighting for) getting potentially harmful chemicals out of the food we eat and the products we use, I’m able to make a bigger impact with the causes that are close to my heart. Back in October 2017, I attended a two-day board meeting in Washington DC, and we also spent a day lobbying on Capitol Hill in support of the Organic Farm Bill. This year I will be dedicating more of my energy to this advocacy work with the goal of building a healthier world with integrative medicine at its core.

If you want to work with me 1:1, I will still be taking clients, but will be limiting my in-person sessions and shifting to a mix of Skype/FaceTime/phone and office visits. I also highly recommend my 14 Day Transformation programs as a self-guided alternative. For more information:

Tips for Preventing Common Skiing Injuries

By Tara Hackney, PT, DPT, OCS, KTTP for Athletico Physical Therapy

tips for preventing common ski injuries

Skiing is a popular outdoor winter activity that we tend to hear a lot about during the Winter Olympic Games. With the Winter Olympics occurring in PyeongChang this year, it is expected that the skiing will be making headlines in the coming weeks – from discussing amazing performances to unpredictable injuries.

Although skiing is a sport where lower body injuries are more common, upper body injuries can occur as well. Read below to learn about five common injuries that downhill skiers should be aware of, as well as tips to prevent these injuries from occurring.

ACL Tears

Most anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears occur from a non-contact knee injury, meaning the tear occurs when the knee is in poor positioning, not by the knee being hit or fallen on. In skiing, ACL tears can occur due to landing a jump in poor form with the weight too far back or when a skier tries to prevent a fall. Skiers who are falling should try to let the fall happen as safely as possible rather than trying to fight it to stand up. Trying to prevent a fall could result in twisting the torso in relation to the lower half, which may lead to knee twisting. This is when the ACL can tear.

MCL Injury

The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is on the inside of the knee. It is often injured or torn when the skier falls after trying to slow or stop by using the ski tips pointed toward one another in the snowplow position. MCL injuries are more common in beginner and intermediate skiers. Tips to decrease risk of MCL injury include making sure weight is balanced when in the snowplow position and staying on runs that are a comfortable challenge but not too advanced for the skier’s skillset.

AC Sprain

An acromioclavicular (AC) joint sprain is an injury to the ligament that holds the AC joint together at the top of the shoulder. Injury to this area is usually caused by a fall onto an outstretched arm. Skiers can decrease the risk of this type of injury by pulling arms toward the body should a fall occur, rather than trying to catch themselves on an outstretched arm.

Clavicle Fracture

Another injury that can occur when falling on the shoulder or outstretched hand is a fractured clavicle. The clavicle is the bone that is commonly called the “collar bone.” The best way to decrease the risk of a clavicle fracture is to decrease the risk of falling by sticking to runs that align with the skier’s skillset.

Thumb Sprain – a.k.a. “Skier’s Thumb”

Skier’s thumb occurs when a skier falls with a pole in hand. This can cause the thumb to overextend and sprains the ligament on the inside portion of the thumb. There are thumb stabilizers available to skiers that need them, otherwise the best way to prevent this injury is to avoid putting hands through the ski pole loops unless absolutely necessary.

Safety First

These are just a few of the injuries that can occur in downhill skiers. Although data shows that women are at a slightly higher risk of knee injuries and men are at a higher risk for shoulder injuries, it is important for all skiers to put safety first – especially inexperienced or novice skiers.

It is also important to note that there may be a higher incidence of head injuries associated with ski jumping or snowboarding where aerial tricks are being performed. To decrease the risk of head injury, helmets should be worn by all skiers and snowboarders. Should muscle soreness or pain occur after hitting the slopes, make sure to visit the nearest Athletico location for a complimentary injury screen.

Schedule a Complimentary Injury Screen

Unlocking Your Potential through Movement: An Exploration of Dance/Movement Therapy

By Erica Hornthal, LCPC, BC-DMT

As a society we have long known the healing benefits of dance. Dance can improve cognition and memory, it can reduce stress, and it can help us get in shape. However, not many people know the emotional and psychological impact movement has on mental health.  Dance applied as an intervention within the therapeutic relationship unlocks individual potential; the potential to increase productivity, maximize performance, manage chronic pain or injury, and connect to passion and purpose.  

What is dance/movement therapy?

According to the American Dance Therapy Association, founded in 1966, “dance/movement therapy is the psychotherapeutic use of movement to promote emotional, social, cognitive and physical integration of the individual.” It is a creative arts therapy that uses movement as the means to observe, assess, and intervene in an individual’s overall health.  Movement is the most primitive instinctual form of communication and expression. It allows for a deeper level of understanding, validation and support.  Not only is no dance experience or coordination needed to reap the benefits, but also, unlike psychotropic medications, there are no negative side effects.  

What is the different between dance and dance/movement therapy?

Dance is a performance art form usually consisting of stylized or choreographed sequences of movement. It is about expression, aesthetics, and often physicality and skill. Dance/movement therapy is first and foremost a niche form of psychotherapy, facilitated by a master’s level clinician that merely uses, movement, a component of dance, to heal and integrate the mind, body, and spirit of an individual. In dance/movement therapy, the “dance” comes from the individual as an organic expression of the self.

What are the benefits of dance/movement therapy?

Dance/movement therapy can benefit people of all ages, abilities, and life circumstances because it supports the individual on a body level where they are in that specific moment in time. Dance therapy has a broad range of health benefits. It has been demonstrated to be clinically effective at improving body image, self-esteem, attentiveness, and communication skills. It can also reduce stress, fears and anxieties, as well as lessen feelings of isolation, body tension, chronic pain, and depression. In addition it can enhance the functioning of the body’s circulatory and respiratory systems.

What does a session look like?

Dance/movement therapy sessions can look much like a talk therapy session. It is often up to the participant how large the movement is or how indulgent it may be. It can incorporate breathing exercises, meditation, mindfulness, stretching, and yes, dance, in addition to verbal processing. It can be done individually, as a couple, or even in a group. Sessions take place in hospitals, nursing homes, day centers, schools, studios, homes, and offices around the world. It is a holistic body-based therapy that can be done standing up, sitting down, or even from a person’s bedside.

Anyone can participate in dance/movement therapy, regardless of age, physical or even cognitive ability.  If you are interested in deepening your mind-body connection, enhancing physical performance through awareness, or physically and emotionally becoming more efficient, consider dance/movement therapy as your approach to mental and physical integration, growth, and healing.  

For more information, go to the American Dance Therapy Association or contact Chicago Dance Therapy.

Joffrey Ballet Partners with MOR, RUMC

the joffrey ballet

Sports medicine and foot and ankle specialists from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush (MOR), who are also on staff at Rush University Medical Center (RUMC), have been selected to serve as preferred medical providers for The Joffrey Ballet, the world-class dance company located in Chicago.

The Joffrey Ballet is the newest professional athletic organization for which this practice provides medical care. MOR physicians are also medical providers for Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, the Chicago White Sox, the Chicago Fire Soccer Club, and the Chicago Bulls.

Dr. Simon Lee, foot and ankle orthopedic surgeon and Dr. Leda Ghannad, sports medicine physician, will serve as head physicians for The Joffrey Ballet. Colleagues Drs. Johnny Lin and Kamran Hamid, also foot and ankle orthopedic specialists will round out the medical team for The Joffrey Ballet.

“We will work with the on-site ballet therapists to help the dancers perform in optimal condition, and if an injury does occur, we can immediately provide the required care to minimize time away from performing,” explains Dr. Lee.

An MOR physician will monitor the Joffrey’s on-site training room once a week and attend each of the Chicago performances in February, April and in the summer of 2018. If a higher level of medical care is needed, dancers will be treated at the MOR clinic or at RUMC. The Joffrey team physicians will also provide care for Joffrey staff members.

Approximately 40 percent of dancers’ injuries involve lower extremities, which are typically overuse injuries. “We understand ballet dancers who are a tough breed of elite athletes with rigorous and lengthy daily practice sessions,” says Dr. Ghannad. “While they may sustain acute injuries, dancers’ foot and ankle injuries are usually caused by repetitive movements.”

About The Joffrey Ballet

The Joffrey Ballet is a world-class, Chicago-based ballet company and dance education organization committed to artistic excellence and innovation, presenting a unique repertoire encompassing masterpieces of the past and cutting-edge works. The Joffrey is committed to providing arts education and accessible dance training through its Joffrey Academy of Dance and Community Engagement programs.

About Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush

Rush University Medical Center’s orthopedics program is ranked #1 in Illinois, according to U.S. News and World Report magazine’s 2017-2018 Best Hospitals issue. Rush also has one of the top sports medicine residency and fellowship training programs in the country.