Ask the Doctor!

This regular segment of ‘Ask the Doctor’ addresses questions submitted by Sports Medicine Weekly followers. Dr. Brian Cole from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush will be discussing:

  • Proper use of the leg press machine
  • Proper Nutrition for Post-workout Recovery 
  • What is Cord Blood Banking?
  • How to safely exercise with sore muscles

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

If you have a question to be addressed on an upcoming show, please click here to submit your question.

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The Importance of Patient Compliance in Rehab

Dr. Alex Bendersky, Director of Rehabilitation at Ivy Rehab Physical Therapy joins Dr. Brian Cole and Steve Kashul to discuss high versus low value physical therapy and the importance of patient compliance with the physician and physical therapist in post-operative recovery.

The orthopedic specialists at Ivy Rehab Physical Therapy are ready to help you get back into the action. Whether you’re overcoming a sports-related injury or recovering from a recent surgery, let our knowledgeable team develop a personalized therapy plan just for you.

What Is Orthopedic Therapy?

Orthopedic Therapy is a form of physical therapy that aims to improve weakened or injured components within the musculoskeletal system through non-invasive treatments such as exercise and stretching. This type of therapy works with all of the bones, joints, tendons, ligaments, and muscles throughout the body. Commonly used in sports medicine to improve recovery, orthopedic therapy is an important part of post-surgery rehabilitation. Orthopedic therapy also helps ease symptoms of chronic joint or bone ailments such as arthritis.Ivy Rehab Network

Ivy Rehab’s physical therapists have expertise in post-surgical rehabilitation, overuse injuries, and inflammation from chronic conditions such as arthritis. Your visit begins with a complete assessment of your current condition so that our skilled clinicians can develop an individualized therapy plan to make the most of your rehabilitation.

Speaking the Language of Recovery

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Selecting the Right Nutrition Bar

Karen Malkin, AADP from Karen Malkin Health Counseling discusses the difference the KMHC Transformation Bar and other nutrition bars on the market.

Karen’s Transformation Superfood bars contain 270 calories for a 60 gram, super heavy bar.  Most other bars are smaller at 45 grams in weight. Transformation bars contain 11 grams of organic rice protein, 12 grams of fiber, and only 5 grams of sugar from the dried cherries. YUM! Transformation bars are non-GMO, made with cashew butter, almonds, cherries, rice protein, 100% unsweetened raw cacao chunks (that taste like chocolate chips), plus superfoods such as flaxseed, spiralina, maca, and greens.

They are vegan, soy-free, gluten-free, and dairy-free. They make a great pre or post workout energizer. They get me through my 3-hour bike rides, and they have enough protein and healthy carbs to be a recovery snack after a great workout! I take them with me when I travel and make a great mini-meal on an airplane or anytime I need some fuel. They are best kept refrigerated but are packaged and can stay out of the fridge at above 72 degrees until the expiration date set on each bar. If you refrigerate or freeze them, they will last even longer! Related-What to Look for in your Protein Bar.

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Ask the Doctor!

This regular segment of ‘Ask the Doctor’ addresses questions submitted by Sports Medicine Weekly followers. Dr. Brian Cole from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush will be discussing:

  • Electronic gaming and problems associated with inactivity
  • Crossfit and injury rates
  • Vitamin D to reduce injury rates
  • Stretching before and after your workout

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

If you have a question to be addressed on an upcoming show, please click here to submit your question.

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Maintaining an Active Lifestyle for Your Heart

By Andrew Grahovec with Contributions from Alexander Brook, PT, DPT for ATI Physical Therapy

Physical activity and maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle is important for your overall health – but just how important is it? Being physically active can reduce the risk of serious noncommunicable diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and cancer. It’s important to understand why physical activity is important for your heart, how much you need on a weekly basis and what types you can perform at home or at the gym.

How important is physical activity?

A 2016 meta-analysis in the Journal of American Heart Association (JAHA) found that by increasing physical activity by 11.25 MET (metabolic equivalent – how much energy you’re expending) hours a week, the risk of cardiovascular mortality and the incidence of diabetes mellitus is reduced 23 and 26 percent, respectively. The World Journal of Cardiology (WJC) reports that physical activity can also slow the progression, lessen the impact and prevent recurrence of heart diseases. The British Medical Journal (BMJ) recognizes the association between physical activity and reduction of osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and better cognitive functioning. Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S., but it can also be prevented or treated with physical activity.

How much physical activity do you need?

The goal of 11.25 hours a week can be broken down to a recommended 150 minutes a week (30 minutes a day for five days) of moderate intensity activity or 75 minutes a week of high intensity activity. Additional benefits can be seen with an increase up to 300 minutes a week. While these are the recommended values, any activity is better than no activity and we all must start somewhere. Gradual, small increases in activity can lead to major health benefits.

What types of physical activities can you perform?

Prior to beginning any workout plan, talk with your doctor to make sure you’re healthy enough to start a workout program. Any good workout program should consist of a warm up, the exercise and a cool down. Cardio isn’t the only way to get a good workout or reach your physical activity goal – strength training is an integral part of any good routine.

For your warm up, perform at least five minutes of low-level aerobic activities such as light walking or biking and dynamic stretching before going into your workout. After your workout, make sure to cool down for five to 10 minutes with a gradual decrease in activity and add in some stretching to stay loose. Here are some great examples of different activities you can perform for your workout:

Moderate Intensity

  • Brisk walking on the treadmill or track
  • Water aerobics
  • Bicycling (outside or stationary) less than 10 mph
  • Gardening
  • Mowing the lawn
  • Golf

Vigorous Intensity

  • Jogging/running
  • Swimming laps
  • Hiking
  • Lifting weights
  • Jumping rope
  • Competitive/organized sports

While this is in no way a full or comprehensive list, it gives you an easy way to start increasing your activity levels and becoming a healthier you.

Are aches and pains getting in the way of your daily activities or from starting an exercise program?

Stop by your nearest ATI Physical Therapy clinic for a complimentary screening and get back to doing you. Our experts will listen to your concerns, evaluate your injury and create a safe and effective plan to help you reach your goals and live a healthy, active lifestyle.

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