Hit Your New Year’s Goals

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D., President, Sideline Sports Doc, Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University

Key Points:

  • New Year’s goals can be achieved with the right set of guidelines to help you
  • Pick a relatively small goal and go bigger when you succeed with the smaller one
  • Use a visual key like a big red X on a calendar for each day you succeed
  • Reward yourself for successful days and weeks
  • Go easy on yourself if you miss a few days and then get back on track

This is the time of year when patients will come in to the office for a “tuneup” prior to starting an exercise regimen. This commonly happens for my 40-60 year old patients but it’s an occasional teenager who has the same objective. They’ve made getting fit and losing weight a New Year’s resolution. Unfortunately, the majority of those folks will fail, and will fall off their new program within a matter of a few weeks.

One of the keys to sticking with any new exercise or lifestyle change is to turn it into a habit.

Creating a new habit and then making that habit permanent can be tough but with some key steps it can be achieved by anyone. If you’re interested in making a major habit change I’d strongly encourage you to read Charles Duhigg’s book: The Power of Habit. In the introductory video you’ll see him describe the three parts of any habit, whether a good habit or a bad habit. There’s a cue (the stimulus), an action (that’s the habit), and a reward (the thing you get from the habit).

It’s interesting to think that a bad habit is associated with a “reward” but Duhigg provides compelling evidence. And so it is with diet and exercise. If you resolve to cut out processed sugar you need to make this a habit. Ditto if you have a resolution involving fitness.

Of the three parts of a habit, I find that the “reward” part is really underappreciated. Too often there’s a feeling that there has to be substantial pain involved in making a new habit but that’s not the case at all. On a daily basis you could give yourself a tiny reward for accomplishing a goal, and perhaps a bigger reward for a larger accomplishment. Just don’t make the reward something that undoes your hard work! For example, if your goal is to eliminate processed sugar during the day don’t reward yourself with a nighttime candy bar!

There are a lot of great people writing about the best ways to pick goals and change habits. Besides Charles Duhigg, I also really like Tony Robbins. There’s also a very nice set of guidelines by Jen Miller in the New York Times.

Here are my overall keys to success for any goal:

  • Pick the right goal. The acronym associated with good goal setting is “SMART”, which means pick a Specific goal and not something vague, make it Measurable, be sure it’s Achievable, choose something Relevant to your life, and put a Timeline on it.
  • Start small. This is related to picking the right goal. You’ll feel empowered to continue if you succeed in very small goals initially, then build with new goals. Many folks pick huge audacious fitness goals but this can be a setup for problems, especially if it’s something totally new for you. I find this is particularly true surrounding exercise. If you’re coming from a place of minimal activity, start with a 20 minute walk rather than a half hour fast run.
  • Use an actual calendar to mark off your progress. Believe it or not, paper actually works best. Keep a calendar where you see it every day. For every day you achieve your daily goal put a big red X on the day. Keep making X’s.
  • Reward yourself on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis for keeping your new good habit going.
  • Go easy on yourself if you have a setback. Things happen that are out of your control and even with the best of intentions you might miss a day or a few days with your new habit. This is not a failure, just a speedbump.

Here’s to your success- Happy New Year!

SideLineSportsDoc

Pre & Post Workout Supplements; Chicago Sports Summit; Replacing Opiods with Physical Therapy

Episode 17.23  Replay

Segment One (01:31): Personal Trainer & Sports Nutritionist, Alex True Strength T-ShirtCarneirofrom Optimum Nutrition helps us understand how to sort out all the information available on supplements to select the best for our training program; the role of protein supplements, caffeine, branched-chain amino acid and resveritrol for building muscle, fueling our workout and recovery.

As an international leading fitness authority, Alexandre Carneiro has spent the last decade educating others on the meaning of fitness, health, and connecting those two things with a healthy mind. With a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology and nutrition, along with positive, motivating philosophies, Carneiro has helped people all over the world achieve their fitness goals. From celebrities to military personal and everyday people, Alexandre has worked and helps expand his philosophy that fitness only needs one thing; a changing mindset.


Segment Two (13:33): Dr. Cole announces the 2nd Annual Chicago Sports Summit, a half-day event featuring some of Chicago’s heaviest hitters. Participants speak about how sports and after school activities empower youth to engage in positive behavior to help reduce Chicago’s violence.

Executives also discuss how they use sports marketing and celebrities to grow their business. Attendees will learn about new developments in sports science and how these advances impact an athlete’s endurance, performance and injury prevention.


Segment Three (20:08): Dr. Wajde  Dabah from Pain Therapy Associates and Dr. Brian Cole discuss the use of physical therapy, as provided by ATI Physical Therapy, for an alternative to Opiods in managing pain.

Related Article

Wajde Dabah, MD, is a board-certified anesthesiologist and pain medicine specialist. He has special expertise in spinal cord stimulation as well as treatment of complex regional pain syndrome, musculoskeletal pain and peripheral neuropathy.

Dr. Dabah believes that chronic pain is a disease no different than hypertension or diabetes and that with time, commitment and partnership with his patients, they will take back control of their lives and overcome their chronic pain.

Dr. Dabah is also the medical director for transcranial magnetic stimulation, innovative technology for the treatment of depression.

THREE-SPORT ATHLETE GETS BACK IN THE GAME AFTER TISSUE TRANSPLANT

By AlloSource: Doing More with Life

JAKE
RECIPIENT OF: BONE AND CARTILAGE

Jake’s life was never without sport: as one season ended, another began. Soccer became basketball, basketball became track, and he enjoyed the athletic challenge of each sport. However, constant knee pain threatened to put Jake on the bench.

Jake’s knee pain started three years ago and doctors suggested he try stretching and physical therapy to remedy the problem, but the pain persisted. When running or playing soccer, his knee would sometimes give out and it became clear to Jake and his parents that more medical attention was necessary.

“I didn’t feel that I was able to compete to my full potential,” said Jake. “I had an obvious limp when running, but I didn’t know what was causing it.”

After an MRI, Jake’s doctor diagnosed him with Osteochondritis dissecans, a joint condition in which cartilage and bone in the knee become loose. Though he was in the midst of a basketball season and looking forward to track, Jake’s diagnosis forced him to stop playing.

Jake and his family sought a second opinion after his diagnosis and they met Dr. John Polousky of HealthONE Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children in Denver. After weighing his options, Jake and his doctor moved forward with surgery. During the procedure, Dr. Polousky used bone and cartilage allografts to replace the damaged tissue and realigned the weight-bearing line in Jake’s leg.

Jake understood prior to his surgery that a deceased tissue donor made the bone and cartilage allografts possible.

“My immediate reaction was sadness. Today I am very appreciative that the person chose to be a donor and wanted to help someone beyond their own life.”

Part of Jake’s recovery included the use of  an external fixator with metal pins anchored into entry points in his leg. “After the surgery I noticed all of the attention I received from strangers. I don’t think they had ever seen an external fixator, and it did look strange,” he said.

Jake recently had the external fixator removed and has started his exercise regimen again. He rides his bike 12 miles per day and does not have any pain.

Receiving donated tissue affirmed Jake’s belief in donation. He registered as a donor when he got his driver’s license and hopes that others will consider registering too.

“I have felt the impact of what it really means to receive something from someone you don’t know. I would be interested in knowing about my donor’s life because
they are a part of me now. He or she made it possible for me to be healthy, so that I can do the things I like to do.”

Therapy that moves you!

By Erica Hornthal, MA, LCPC, BC-DMT, Chicago Dance Therapy

Chicago Dance Therapy is the premier dance/movement therapy practice serving Chicago and its surrounding suburbs. Offering psychotherapy with a body-centered approach focused on connecting mind, body, and spirit.


Mind

In dance/movement therapy, movement is the therapeutic tool used to process feelings and emotions. The client is encouraged to experience, observe, and process behaviors and thoughts through body sensations, non-verbal communication, and body language. We use the body to recharge, refocus, and even re-pattern the mind.


Body

We use the body to assess, observe, and intervene in the therapeutic relationship. When words alone may not be expressing what someone is experiencing, dance/movement therapy can help to validate and support each individual.


Spirit

This holistic alternative to traditional talk therapy is a wonderful way to treat mind, body, and spirit. Using movement we can connect to our subconscious, enhance our awareness, and learn to be more present.


According to the American Dance Therapy Association, dance/movement therapy is the psychotherapeutic use of movement to promote emotional, cognitive, physical and social integration of the individual. Benefits of dance/movement therapy include:

  • Facilitate self-awareness
  • Enhance self-esteem
  • Reduce anxiety
  • Encourage reminiscing
  • Maintain and/or increases mobility
  • Enhance body-mind connectivity
  • Focus on non-verbal communication
  • Enhance emotional and physical well being