5 ways to fuel up for exercise

By ATIPT

work_out_imageWater, sports drinks, energy chews, protein bars, recovery shakes, bananas, carbohydrates – which should you put in your body before a workout? What about after? Which help aid weight loss? Which help aid muscle building?

We know there’s a lot to take in. That’s why our athletic trainer Jessica Thompson weighed in with these five tips for fueling up for exercise…

  1. Water is the way to go during a workout: During an actual workout or game, water is the way to go. It helps replenish and hydrate you throughout your exercise session.
  2. Save your sports drinks for before or after your sweat session: Studies have shown that the nutrients in sports drinks aren’t absorbed in your system right away, says Jessica. Therefore, use it before or after a workout when your body has time to absorb the nutrients and properly replenish.
  3. Power through strength training with protein: Hitting the gym to lift weights and do some strength training? Try to eat about 90 minutes before your workout. The pre-workout snack should consist of a protein or energy bar and some fruit, Jessica says. Protein helps you build muscle and fruit contains natural sugars to give you an energy boost.
  4. Kill your cardio workout with carbs: Ramping up for a cardio workout? Be sure to get some carbohydrates before your workout. A small meal of whole grain carbohydrates (like wheat bread or crackers) along with fruit can help you power through a cardio workout and give you the energy you need.
  5. Carbohydrates key after a workout: When recovering from a workout, it’s important to replenish yourself with plenty of carbohydrates and some proteins within 30 minutes of finishing. With its mix of carbs and protein, chocolate milk is a great recovery food. And, even though you just worked out, it’s important to avoid anything with a lot of fat, says Jessica. Your body needs nutrients after exerting itself, and that’s not something fatty foods can typically provide.

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Custom-Fitted Spine Implants

Personalized rods may improve outcomes, cut surgery time

spine_colman_storyCustom fit is the key when it comes to spinal implant rods, which an estimated 38,000 people need each year. This need is especially great for people who have a spinal deformity such as scoliosis, which causes the spine to twist and turn into complex and sometimes dangerous positions. In 2010 and 2011, an estimated 1.6 million people received treatment for scoliosis according to the Bone and Joint Initiative, a consortium of professional medical societies.

Correcting this deformity involves moving a distorted spine into a different position, which is no simple task. To accomplish it, surgeons attach metal rods to the bones surrounding the spinal column in order to support and straighten the spine.

To perform this demanding procedure, surgeons previously needed to be as much a sculptor as a physician. Over the years, they have mastered the art of cutting, bending and twisting metal rods to fit each patient.

Often, however, this manipulation may create weak spots in the rod where it can break in the future. In addition, the manipulation of the rods traditionally has been done in the operating room during surgery, adding to the time a patient spends in surgery under anesthesia.

Now, however, advances in medical imaging and implant manufacturing are making it possible to tailor an implant to the patient receiving it.

Matthew Colman, MD, has begun using patient-specific rods in reconstructive surgery — giving patients with spinal deformities implants designed to fit their anatomy perfectly. An assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at Rush University Medical Center, Colman is one of few spinal surgeons in the world who also specializes in spine cancer treatment and was one of the first doctors in Chicago to use these patient specific rods.

The customization is done in advance of the operation in cooperation with an implant manufacturer. To create the rods, Colman uploads the patient’s calibrated X-rays to a computer. Then he uses a sophisticated software program to plan the reconstructive surgical procedure.

The software allows him to simulate deformity correction and other surgical maneuvers in order to map out and determine the exact length and shape of the rod. The specifications are sent to the manufacturer, and the finished rod is delivered to Rush.

Because so much of the planning is done before surgery, less time is needed during the operation itself. “When we reduce time operating room we help to decrease the chances for infection and blood loss during surgery — and we decrease potential mistakes with the measurements,” Colman says. “In addition, manipulating the rod by hand-bending them may cause them to break more easily, which is theoretically avoided with the custom manufacturing process.”

In addition to custom-made spinal rods, Colman has also been involved in the design of patient-specific 3-D printed vertebral cages, which are used to provide anterior (frontal) support for spinal reconstructions when the area in front of the spine has been MOR300x250destroyed or removed due to infection, a tumor or trauma. The cages are in the process of receiving U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for use in the United States.

“The future of implants is in customization,” Colman says. “New technology is streamlining the process, making surgery more efficient and effective by employing faster and better working methods.”

Stronger than Yesterday: Setting Strength Training Goals

By Kirstie Chase for Athletico

A New Year can be unpredictable, but setting authentic goals combined with genuine pursuit can usher in the kinds of change and inspiration you are seeking. If becoming stronger and more confident are goals you have in mind, this post has tips to make it happen!

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As mentioned in the first post of this series (#Stronger than Yesterday: Why Should I Strength Train?), building physical strength is a profoundly effective route to increasing overall health. Unfortunately, success does not happen overnight. Achieving your healthiest self is a process, and the initial steps call for a mindset of growth, defining success and setting goals.

Attitude will affect behavior. Attitude plays a pivotal role in reaching fitness goals.1 Beginning and continued strength training is heavily influenced by upholding a positive mindset. This is a thoughtful process. It is important to reflect upon your attitude toward strength training. A positive attitude will increase the likelihood that you will stick to your goals.1

For instance, it is important to acknowledge there will likely be barriers to deal with when setting a goal. Lack of time is one of the biggest barriers people attribute to not being able to exercise.2 Understanding barriers you may be up against is a great way to begin cultivating a mindset for change. Ask yourself the following questions to gauge your attitude about setting new strength training goals:

  1. What is appealing about strength training?
  2. What am I hoping to accomplish?
  3. What benefits will I receive from committing to my strength training goals?

Defining success also defines action. Goal orientation is another valuable component in goal setting. The way in which you define success will dictate the actions you take to reach success.3

It is important that goals are rooted in acquiring new skills, learning and self-improvement. Goals oriented in this way lead to greater satisfaction and achievement in exercise. It is also important to view individualized strength goals as a process toward becoming the best version of yourself. In doing so you will continue to develop an attitude that believes improvement is possible and that you can become stronger. Ask yourself the following questions about the orientation of your strength training goals:

  1. How will I define success in my strength training goal?
  2. What new skills do I want to learn as I work toward this goal?

Goals should be S.M.A.R.T. With any new fitness goal it is important to concretely define the specifics to increase the likelihood of success. Setting your goals using the “S.M.A.R.T.” strategy allows you to consider the details of your training.4 Each goal should be:

Specific – A specific goal should have an outline detailing what it is. The more specific the better!

Measurable – Tracking progress can be in the amount of sets, weight lifted or days committed to lifting. Goals become easier to reach when success is measurable.

Attainable – It is important that strength training goals are within your reach. A goal set too high will be extreme, a goal set too low will be something you know you can do easily. An attainable goal should fall somewhere in the middle!

Relevant – Any goal put in place should have importance to your life as it is now. Trying to achieve someone else’s strength training goal can have detrimental effects to progression.

Timely – Goals need an end-point. Giving your goal a timeline adds accountability to your strength training routine!

Healthier Habits Start with Goals

Physical success in the gym is proceeded by positive attitudes and smart goals. Ifathletico300x250 beginning a new strength training program is your goal in the New Year, it is important to start with the mind so the body can follow. Getting strong is much more than picking up heavy weights. Building long-lasting healthy habits starts with a mindset of growth.

If you want to learn more about strength training, schedule an appointment at an Athletico near you.

Click to Request an Appointment Today

3D Animation on Torn ACL Procedures

acl-allograft

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four ligaments that are crucial to the stability of your knee. It is a strong fibrous tissue that connects the femur to the tibia. A partial or complete tear of your ACL will cause your knee to become less stable and feel as though your knee is about to give out. The following videos will describe the different options available to repair or replace your torn ACL.

Visit  our Patient Education page for the full Library of 50 specific Orthopedic Surgical Procedures in 3D Animation. Produced by an experienced team of medical writers, 3D BCMD whiteanimators, and project managers with a detailed understanding of anatomy and surgery; they take complex surgical procedures and animate the steps to tell a visually stunning story in 3D that is both educational and entertaining. Each animation is embedded with an illustrated script which can be shared, viewed or printed separately.

ACL SURGERY IN GROWING ADOLESCENT KIDS

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D., President, Sideline Sports Doc, Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University

Key Points:

  • We are seeing more ACL injuries in young growing athletes than we used to several decades ago, and more young athletes choose to have early ACL surgery
  • ACL surgery in a growing athlete requires special considerations to minimize chances of injury to the growth plates
  • With proper techniques, risk to the growth plates is low and success rates for surgery are very good although results are not as good as they are for adults after ACL surgery

An ACL tear in growing athletically active kids is a challenging issue to manage from a allograft ACLsurgeon’s standpoint. It appears that the number of young people sustaining ACL tears is on the rise, and in particular we are seeing more ACL injuries in kids who are not done with their growth.

As compared to kids who are still growing, teenagers who are done growing can be treated as adults when it comes to surgical decision making. Regardless of age, the main issue with a torn ACL is that the knee is typically unstable, making some sports and daily activities difficult. A knee with a torn ACL often gives way or buckles with activities.

Some surgeons will recommend that a young patient modify activity and possibly wear a brace until growth is finished, and then go through the ACL surgery. This is theoretically possible but it’s often very difficult to successfully manage a young person’s activity level, leading to quite a bit of unhappiness. This study showed that only 6% to 52% of young athletes were able to remain physically active to their desired level when managed without surgery, whereas 80% to 100% of young athletes managed surgically were able to successfully return to their desired level of activity. The surgical option tends to be much more appealing to most kids and parents.

The surgery for a torn ACL- called “ACL reconstruction”- involves building a new ligament by drilling tunnels in the tibia and femur, and then placing a new tissue called a “graft” in those tunnels. As the graft heals and matures it functions as the new ACL. In a young growing athlete the key consideration is that the areas of the bone where growth takes place, the “growth plates”, can theoretically be damaged by the surgery. This means that there’s a chance that either the leg length or the angulation of the leg could be altered by the surgery.

Considerable research has gone into the ways to minimize risk to the growth plates during surgery. Some techniques involve modifications to the tunnel positions to avoid crossing the growth plates. Other research has studied the effects of various types of ACL grafts on growth using conventional surgery techniques.

Not surprisingly, in this relatively new area of ACL research there is some controversy. The growth plate sparing techniques may have somewhat reduced stability compared to a conventional technique. And some graft choices may have a higher risk of damage to the growth plate. For example, a patellar tendon graft with bone plugs is commonly used in adults but there appears to be a higher risk of growth disturbance if the bone plug crosses the growth plate. Hamstring tendon grafts and conventional tunnel drilling technique seem to have the best combination of stability, excellent return to sport, and low risk of injury to the growth plates.

Some recently published studies have shown excellent functional results from the surgery with low rates of bone growth issues. This study of surgery on young people with open growth plates using conventional surgical technique and hamstring grafts showed about 15% of kids with some x-ray evidence of growth issues at 4 years, but none of the issues was limiting to the young athlete. Interestingly, this study showed that during the 4 year follow up period 16% of the kids retore the ACL, and 16% tore the ACL in the other knee. Success rates are quite a bit higher in adults.

ssd.bannerThis is a controversial area with a number of important considerations when deciding treatment pathways. My advice if you’re a parent of a young growing athlete with an ACL tear is to seek the opinion of highly experienced sports medicine surgeons, or possibly a pediatric sports medicine specialist to assist you in your decision.