Dr. Cole Honored with Distinguished Alumnus Award at Hospital for Special Surgery

The HSS Distinguished Alumnus Award was created to acknowledge an exemplary alumnus who has shown leadership and/or has had special recognition in his/her professional specialty and has actively participated in HSS Alumni Affairs.

As a graduate of HSS, Dr. Cole is among an illustrious group of alumni from a very special institution. Hospital for Special Surgery is the oldest orthopaedic hospital in the country. With over 1,500 members, its active Alumni Association spans the globe having alumni in 33 foreign countries and 47 US states.

Featured Body Part: Head

By: Cori Cameron and Katie Varnado, ATC for ATI Physical Therapy

Featured Body Part: Head

The brain is one of the most important and powerful organs in our body. It’s also one that we may often take for granted; forgetting the fact that it’s responsible for everything from our movements to our thoughts. According to the Brain Facts from Medical Daily, 85 billion neurons must complete upwards of five trillion chemical reactions each second, at speeds of over 260 miles per hour to keep us going. That’s crazy impressive! With all of this power and responsibility, comes the fact that we need to be able to protect our head and brain. The more we know about prevention and the cause of injury, the better the chances are of avoiding an injury in the future.

Common Conditions

  • Hematoma – A collection of blood outside the blood vessels. This can cause pressure to build inside your skull, causing loss of consciousness or even permanent brain damage.
  • Hemorrhage – Uncontrolled bleeding can occur in the space around your brain or there can be bleeding within your brain tissue.
  • Concussion – A brain injury that occurs when your brain is jarred or shaken inside the skull. Loss of function is typically temporary, but repeated concussions could lead to permanent damage.
  • Skull Fracture – A break in one or more of the bones in the cranial portion of the skull. When the skull is broken it is unable to absorb the impact of a blow, which makes it more likely that there will be brain damage as well.

Common Causes
Head injuries can be broken into two categories:

  • Blows to the Head – Injuries are typically caused by:
    • Motor vehicle accidents
    • Falls
    • Physical assaults
    • Sports-related accidents
  • Shaking – While this is most common in infants and small children, they can occur any time one experiences violent shaking.

Injury Prevention
Katie Varnado, ATC, Midwest Director of Sports Medicine, gives us some tips to help prevent and rehabilitate head injuries:

  • Appropriate Equipment – Make sure to wear the appropriate protective equipment for your sport.  This could include helmets and mouthguards.  Equally as important as having the correct equipment is making sure it is fitted appropriately (not too loose).
  • Use Proper Technique – Make sure you have learned and practice proper technique for the sport you play. Do not lead with your head and do not use your head as a “weapon.”
  • Neck Strengthening Exercises – Some scholars believe that strengthening the neck musculature allows forces dissipate during a head collision or rapid rotation, thus reducing the force the brain sustains and lowering your risk of concussion.

Rehabilitation
Rehabilitation after a head injury is important and recognition of an injury is key:

  • Know the Signs and Symptoms of a Concussion – Headache, dizziness and nausea are just a few.
  • Discontinue Physical Activity – If you suspect you have sustained a concussion, it is important to immediately remove yourself from further physical activity.
  • Seek Appropriate Medical Evaluation – See an athletic trainer, physical therapist or a physician for a full evaluation.
  • Rest – Physical and cognitive rest are crucial to allowing the brain to heal. Follow physician instructions regarding gradually returning to taxing activities.
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation – If you have symptoms that do not resolve in a relatively short time span, vestibular therapy may help reduce symptoms.

When weighing your treatment options for head injury rehabilitation, consider physical therapy. Physical therapy offers a wide variety of treatment options including strengthening, stretching, and sustainable home exercise programs. Stop in or call any ATI location for a complimentary injury screen or to learn more about how physical therapy can help you overcome your pain.

Get your head in the game with ATI!

Analyzing Chicago Bears Tight End Zach Miller’s Knee Injury

By Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush 

November 1, 2017

Will Chicago Bears tight end Zach Miller ever play in the NFL again?zach miller knee injury

Miller suffered one of the more gruesome injuries you will see in professional sports while trying to make a touchdown catch. Miller, a longtime NFL veteran, came down awkwardly on his left knee, suffering not only ligament damage, but also a torn popliteal artery that required emergency vascular surgery to repair.

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph and Dr. Nikhil Verma, both sports medicine orthopedic surgeons at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, joined local Chicago news affiliates to discuss Miller’s injury and what the recovery process will be like. Dr. Bush-Joseph says that the odds of Miller playing football in the NFL again are “very small.”


ABC 7 Chicago

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph sat down with ABC 7 Chicago’s Christian Farr to analyze Zach Miller’s knee injury.


FOX 32 Chicago

Dr. Nikhil Verma joined Good Day Chicago on Fox 32 Chicago to discuss Chicago Bears Zach Miller’s devastating injury to the knee.

Hear related interview with former Chicago Bear Otis Wilson in Episode 17.30 

The Healing Process of an Ankle Fracture

By Steven Sapoznik for Athletico Physical Therapy

As all NBA fans know, the first major injury of the 2017-2018 season occurred to star The Healing Process of an Ankle Fractureguard of the Boston Celtics, Gordon Hayward. Gordon suffered an ankle fracture 5 minutes and 15 seconds into the start of the season.

Gordon successfully underwent surgical stabilization of his fractured tibia and dislocated ankle and is on the road to recovery that will include many hours of physical therapy in hopes of resuming his professional basketball career. With ankle fractures catching the medical headlines over the last week, Athletico would like to shed some light on the subject.

Fracture vs. Break

Over the years as a physical therapist I’ve often gotten the question, “’What is a fracture and what is a break?’” Most are surprised to hear that they are one and the same. While both are acceptable, ‘fracture’ is the medical term to describe a break of the bone whereas ‘break’ is considered the layman’s term.

Types of Fractures

The ankle joint is made up of the tibia, fibula and talus. Ligaments, tendons and muscles surround these bones to add stability and function to the lower leg. Not all fractures of the ankle are the same. The classification of the fracture depends on the severity and bones involved in the injury. Examples include medial malleolar and bimalleolar fractures. A medial malleolar fracture involves the bony prominence on the inside of the ankle whereas a bimalleolar fracture involves both the inside and outside bony prominence’s of your ankle.

Surgery vs. Conservative Care

The determining factor for managing a fracture with surgical or conservative interventions depends on the extent and severity of the injury. If a fracture is stable and does not involve other structures surrounding the joint, a period of immobilization with modified weight bearing status may be all that is necessary before beginning physical therapy. Conversely, an unstable or compound fracture of the ankle will most likely require surgical stabilization before initiating physical therapy.

Physical Therapy Following Ankle Fractures

Physical therapy is initiated at the time that a fracture is deemed healed, regardless of surgical status. After a fracture and period of immobilization, muscle atrophy, loss of range of motion and difficulty walking on uneven surfaces typically occur.1

Timelines will vary based on individual patients, however standard physical therapy of an ankle fracture typically begins with gentle range of motion exercises, gait training, and strengthening.2 Once ready, balance and proprioceptive exercises are initiated at 4-6 weeks.2 Gradual return to normal activities usually begins around the 6-8 week mark and full return to activities is typically allowed in the 3-6 month range.2

Making a Comeback

While Gordon Hayward may be out for the rest of the season, he will be in a great position to make a comeback with physical therapy treatment in the coming months. The best part about physical therapy is that you don’t have to be the next NBA star to benefit from it. Physical therapists specialize in rehabilitation of conditions of the musculoskeletal system. If you have an injury or unusual aches and pains, schedule an appointment at a nearby Athletico clinic so we can help you feel better and make your comeback. 

Request an Appointment Today