Donor Family Shares Story of Hope; Zach Miller Knee Injury; Cheerleader Injuries

Episode 17.30 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:30): The Healing Process of Donor Parents Lori and Rob Chana.

Cameron Chana (2)Cameron Chana was a born leader who focused on making an impact in lives of others. He was very involved in volunteer work, his church, and went on mission trips across the world. No matter where he was, he encouraged positivity and spread his caring, upbeat energy.

The Chana family’s world was turned upside down when twenty-two-year old Cameron was killed in a bus accident in 2009. During a time of unimaginable grief, his parents and three siblings honored his wish to be a donor.

Cameron’s legacy of hope and love lives on through the gift of organ and tissue donation. He saved five lives through organ donation and impacted as many as 50 lives through tissue donation. Learn more at AllowSource.

Lori & Rob Chana with Steve and Dr. Cole

Chana family with Cameron on the Left

Cameron’s heart recipient


Segment Two (14.12): Steve and Dr. Cole talk with former Chicago Bear Otis WilsonUSP NFL: CHICAGO BEARS AT NEW ORLEANS SAINTS S FBN NO CHI USA LA about Zach Millers horrific knee injury in the recent game against the New Orleans Saints. Chicago Bears Zach Miller had emergency surgery last week to repair a torn popliteal artery in his left leg, an injury that has resulted in amputation in some previous instances involving other football players. The 33-year-old dislocated his left knee while trying to catch a touchdown pass, which subsequently damaged the artery.


Segment Three (21:04): Dr. Kathy Weber from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about the prevalence of catastrophic injuries and concussions in cheerleaders. Cheerleading is by far the most perilous sport for female athletes in high school and college, accounting for as much as two-thirds of severe school-sports injuries over the past 25 years, according to a new report. Yet cheerleading remains one of the least-regulated sports, despite more than 95,000 high school girls and 2,000 boys signing up for spirit squads nationwide each year.


kathleen weberDr. Weber’s reputation as a leading sports medicine physician is enhanced by her remarkable activity in the treatment of high-level professional athletes. She serves as the head primary care sports medicine team physician for the Chicago Bulls and the Chicago White Sox and the head team physician for the Chicago Force Women’s Football. She also serves as co-head team physician for the DePaul Blue Demons and the physician for the Hubbard Street Dance and the River North Dance Companies. In addition, she is a member of the LPGA Medical Advisory Board. She is on numerous committees including the NBA Team Physicians Executive Committee, NBA Research Committee, MLB Concussion Committee, and MLB Research Committee. Dr. Weber has been involved with the MLB Medical Advisory Board for multiple years and is the first women elected President of the MLB Team Physicians Association.

Coming Back From Shoulder Separation

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D., President, Sideline Sports Doc, Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University

Key Points:

  • A “shoulder separation” is a different injury than a shoulder dislocation
  • The shoulder separation involves a sprain to the ligaments of a joint at the point of the shoulder near the end of the collarbone
  • We will often see these injuries when a player is tackled or falls to the ground on the point of the shoulder, with the arm at the player’s side
  • Most shoulder separations from sports injuries can successfully be treated without surgery

I’ve written recently about shoulder dislocation, a serious condition in which the ball portion of the shoulder (humerus) becomes completely dislodged from the socket. This week we’ll discuss a shoulder separation, another common shoulder injury. But first let’s clear up some terminology to avoid confusion.

A separated shoulder refers to an injury to the ligaments of the acromioclavicular joint (commonly known as the AC joint), which is the joint between the end of your collarbone and the upper part of your shoulder blade. It’s located near the point of the shoulder.

Most shoulder separations occur during some type of hard fall or contact, such as a quarterback being tackled on to his shoulder, or a cyclist falling and landing on his shoulder. When I see a hard fall to the ground I’ll be suspicious for either a shoulder separation or a broken collarbone if the athlete fell with the arm tucked in to the side, and I’m suspicious for a shoulder dislocation if the athlete fell on to the outstretched hand.

There are six types of shoulder separations. Types 1 and 2 are the most common ones we see in sports injuries and are treated without surgery. Type 3 injuries are also reasonably common, and most of these are treated without surgery (although there is some debate about early repair for the throwing shoulder of an elite athlete…). Types 4-6 are not seen very often in sports injuries and these will require surgery. I refer to these as “types” although some surgeons will call these “grades”.

  • Type 1 – The ligaments have a mild sprain without a tear.
  • Type 2 – The AC ligament tears, leading to a partial separation.
  • Type 3 – The AC ligament and other associated ligaments tear, leading to a complete separation.
  • Types 4-6 – These are complete separations, serious injuries often requiring urgent surgery. I have seen one type 4 separation in a D1 quarterback during my 23-year career.

Here are typical return to play times for the common types:

  • Type 1: You can usually return to play 2-3 weeks after the injury, depending on your sport and position. You should be comfortable, with full motion, normal strength, and ability to do sport specific motions. Treatment includes rest and anti-inflammatory medication.
  • Types 2 and 3: A Type 2 injury takes about 3-4 weeks to fully heal, and a type 3 injury takes about six to eight weeks to heal. We’ll almost always treat these without surgery, and we’ll use the same return to play criteria as indicated above for the Type 1 injury. If you’re in a collision sport (such as football) I’ll usually recommend you return to play with an AC joint pad to minimize the chance of another injury.

SideLineSportsDoc

Thoughts on Vegas, and Why Men Keep Doing This

While we acknowledge that this post may stray a bit from our usual content, in the wake of the Las Vegas tragedy we believe this provocative content is worth reading by our followers. Excerpts from the article by Charlie Hoehn on beyourself.

“There’s probably no way to ever know why a human being could do something like this to other human beings.”

Sadly, researchers know a lot about why human beings — particularly men — do things like this.

Why mass shootings keep happening

It’s tempting to say the mass shooter’s motive was simply “pure evil,” or to blame the media or guns, but that absolves us of looking deeply at what each of us — as individuals, family members, friends, and community members — might be missing.

1- Men in the United States are chronically lonely.

Boys in the United States — just like all human beings — need touch, caring, warmth, empathy, and close relationships. But as we grow up, most of us lose those essential components of our humanity. What’s worse: we have no idea how to ask for those things, or admit we need them, because we’re afraid it will make us look weak. As a man, you might be thinking, “Not me, I’ve got drinking buddies. I play poker with the guys. I’ve got friends.”

From an early age, we have an unhealthy ideal of masculinity that we try to live up to. Part of that ideal tells us that Real men do everything on their ownReal men don’t cry. Real men express anger through violence. The byproduct is isolation. Most men spend the majority of their adult lives without deeper friendships, or any real sense of community. Not to mention a complete inability to release anger or sadness in a healthy way.

There is a fantastic documentary called The Mask You Live In, which explains how boys in our society are ultimately shaped into mentally unstable adults. My friend Ryan recommended this film to me, after confiding that he cried throughout the entire thing. I cried, as well.


“We’re seeing a rise of loneliness and isolation. No one kills themselves when they’re hungry; we kill ourselves when we’re lonely. And we act out, as well.

  • In the 1960’s, there was one school shooting.
  • In the 1980’s, there were 27.
  • In the 1990’s, there were 58.
  • In the past decade, there have been over 120.

How do we combat the loneliness that kids are feeling? All of them attacked people in their own community, and all of them attack people they blamed for their own loneliness.”


This loneliness compounds as men grow older. Without deeper friendships or a strong sense of community, the isolation is soul-deadening and maddening. You are alone. Any slight from someone you care about can feel emotionally traumatizing. After enough rejections and feeling like an outcast, you begin to believe that people are just cruel and not worth the effort. You perceive people as threats.


2- Men in the United States are deprived of play opportunities.

Homo sapiens play more than any other species. It’s impossible to prevent a human from playing. We play shortly after we are born, and the healthiest (and least stressed) humans tend to play for their entire lives.

Play may be God’s greatest gift to mankind. It’s how we form friendships, and learn skills, and master difficult things that help us survive. Play is a release valve for stress, and an outlet for creativity. Play brings us music, comedy, dance, and everything we value.

Above all, play is how we bond with each other — it’s how we communicate “I am safe to be around, I am not a threat.” Play is how we form connections with other humans. The irony is that loneliness would not be a problem if we all got ample time to play. Not only would we have deeper friendships, we’d also have better relationships with ourselves. Play allows us to enjoy our own company.

There is a strong correlation with play deprivation and mental illness.

When you deprive mammals of play, it leads to chronic depression. When you deprive a human child of play, their mental and emotional health deteriorate. Play suppression has enormous health consequences.

This is in alignment with Dr. Peter Gray’s research, who studied the epidemic of mental illness and the decline in play:

“Over the past half century, in the United States and other developed nations, children’s free play with other children has declined sharply. Over the same period, anxiety, depression, suicide, feelings of helplessness, and narcissism have increased sharply in children, adolescents, and young adults… The decline in play has contributed to the rise in the psychopathology of young people.


This is why I believe mental illness may be the biggest health crisis of our lifetimes. Because those kids will grow up into isolated adults who don’t know how to play, or seek out their friends when they are lonely. They have no emotional support.

They are alone.


Universal among violent criminals was the fact that they were keeping a secret. A central secret. And that secret was that they felt ashamed— deeply ashamed, chronically ashamed, acutely ashamed.

ALL OF US will face difficult times in our lives where we will experience shame, humiliation, disrespect, and ridicule. Do you know what gets us through those hard times?

Friendship: The love and support you get, from the people you play with.

“I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was twelve. Jesus, does anyone?” — Stand by Me, final line

Whatever the case, these factors about mass shooters are often true:

  1. They are deeply lonely. They have no significant friendships to rely on, and very few quality people to confide in.
  2. They experienced ongoing play deprivation. Their innate ability was crippled, and they struggle to maintain a healthy emotional connection with themselves and others.
  3. They are deeply ashamed. They experienced extreme ridicule, rejection, or humiliation.

Are there other factors at play here?  Read the entire article here >>

Be Yourself

13 Things You May Not Know About Athletic Trainers

By Kele Cioflec for Athletico Physical Therapy

If you’ve been at an interscholastic event, you’ve likely seen an athletic trainer at work and probably didn’t even know it. The National Athletic Training Association (NATA) states that “athletic training encompasses the prevention, examination, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of emergent, acute or chronic injuries and medical conditions.”

Every year the NATA has a theme for National Athletic Training Month. This year’s theme is very true and close to the hearts of Athletico’s athletic trainers – “Your Protection is Our Priority.” To help celebrate the month, check out these facts that you may not know about athletic trainers:

1. Athletic Trainers go to school for four years at a CAATE accredited college to complete a Bachelor’s degree. After graduation, athletic trainers take the Board Of Certification (BOC) exam, which covers everything that was learned in college. Passage of the BOC is a requirement for the practice of athletic training in most states.1

2. 70 percent of Certified Athletic Trainers have a Master’s Degree.

3. The American Medical Association, Health Resources Services Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services recognize Athletic Training as an allied health care profession.

4. Athletic Trainers are licensed/regulated in 49 states and the District of Columbia.

5. Every two years athletic trainers are required to complete 50 Continuing Education Units to maintain their athletic training certification with the BOC.

6. Athletic trainers aren’t just at high schools, colleges and youth sporting events. A few of the other settings you can find these professionals include physician offices, health care administrations, law enforcement, theaters, industrial sites and the military.

7. The Athletic Training Profession started in the 20th century and the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) was founded in 1950.

8. Athletic Trainers can apply for a National Provider Identifier (NPI)as mid-level health care professional. The NPI is a unique, 10-digit identification number issued to health care providers in the U.S. by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

9. Athletic trainers abide by HIPAA laws just like all medical professionals. An athlete’s injury (and recovery) is between the athlete, the athletic trainer, a parent/guardian if the athlete is under 18 and a doctor (if the athlete is seeing one).

10. The priority of athletic trainers is to protect the athletes they work with. Their goal is to help athletes get back to 100 percent health as fast and safely as possible.

11. Athletic trainers get just as excited for game days as athletes do! They may even have their own “game day rituals.”

12. Athletic trainers do a lot of “behind the scenes” work. Some of the duties outside of game time assistance include organizing physicals and assist with administrative duties, keeping meticulous notes on injuries, and pre- and post-game/practice treatments.

13. Athletic trainers are here to help everyone on the teams they work with!

Celebrating NATM

Athletico Certified Athletic Trainers are highly skilled and educated health professionals who work to provide optimal health care to athletes. If your organization is in need of an athletic trainer, please click the button below.

⇒Athletic Training Outreach