Understanding Allograft Cartilage Transplants

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Articular cartilage is a firm rubbery tissue that covers the ends of bones. It provides a smooth gliding surface for joints and acts as a cushion between bones.Cartilage can break down due to overuse or injury. This can lead to pain and swelling and problems with your joint.

Your treatment will depend on the size of the defect and the judgment of your surgeon. This procedure is performed on people who have a specific cartilage defect typically due to an injury. It is not done when cartilage loss is much more extensive.

A plug of allograft tissue containing bone and cartilage is shaped to fit into the area that is damaged. The damaged area is prepared and the new plug is inserted into the site.

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JRF Ortho specializes in providing orthopedic surgeons with the highest viability, most widely available cartilage solutions in the industry. Our goal is to provide innovative solutions for allograft joint repair to orthopedic surgeons who specialize in helping patients regain movement and improve their quality of life; thus, JRF Ortho is redefining the standard for allograft joint repair and maximizing the gift of donation.

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Why Sweat Testing Matters?

Research shows that at only about 2 percent loss of body weight through sweat, performance begins to decline. Gatorade Sports Science Institute scientist Lisa Heaton and dietitian Linda Samuels traveled to the Advocate Center to conduct sweat testing during a Windy City Bulls practice. The results are used to help create personalized fuel and hydration plans for each individual player.

Dr. Chuck Bush Joseph of Midwest Orthopedics at Rush, Steve Kashul & Linda Samuels discuss Gatorade’s Contribution to Sports Nutrition Consulting and Sweat Testing: Why sweat testing matters and what the players and the league are getting out of it.

Linda Samuels, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN is a Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics. She is owner of Training Table Sports Nutrition, in Chicago. Linda has specialized in Ironman length tri-nutrition for 12 years.

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DEVELOPING THE YOUNG FEMALE ATHLETE

In 2011, Naomi Kutin broke a world powerlifting record, squatting 215 lbs. She was in the 97 lbs weight clas…and was just nine years old. She broke a record previously held by a 44 year old German woman. Since then, Naomi has become a prodigy with the nickname “Supergirl” in the lifting community. Now, at 16, she has continued to astound, deadlifting 365 lbs in the last Pan American Championships with Team USA.

As you look at your own daughter, you’re probably thinking, “Thank goodness my daughter wants to play softball… “Aren’t girls like Naomi a special case?” And…most importantly, “Is what Naomi doing in that video EVEN SAFE???” As parents, coaches, trainers…we all walk a fine line. We want to keep young athletes from the life-long consequences of injury but we still want to help them be their best. Especially if they LOVE their sport. No one wants to put out the fire of a young athlete. But when is it our responsibility to draw the line? How can we prepare our young athletes for the risks of their sport?

Until recently, strength training and young athletes has been a taboo subject. Even more so for females. Most parents have no problems signing their daughter up for softball or soccer, but strength training? It just doesn’t happen that easily. Here’s the problem: Our girls are getting hurt.  In soccer. In softball. In volleyball. And, our girls are getting hurt more often- and worse -than our boys.

With more females participating in sports over the last decade, science has devoted a greater focus to female athletes and their development. Currently, data for gender-matched sports show females present a higher incidence of injuries than male athletes. And when we think about it….it makes sense!!! We KNOW that male athletes have more muscle mass and a baseline of strength due to their hormonal makeup (hello higher testosterone!).

YET in gender-matched sports with similar rules (ie softball/ baseball, basketball, soccer, lacrosse, volleyball, etc), males and females are exposed to the SAME FORCES on the field or court. But we keep throwing our comparatively weaker females on to this field or court.

It’s no wonder our female athletes keep getting injured!

Girls are seeing an increase in injury in sports, particularly

  • stress fractures,
  • ACL tears,
  • and other knee injuries like PFPS (patellofemoral pain syndrome)

What’s the solution? How can we prepare young female athletes for a healthy athletic career?

Strength Training.

The science is clear: strength training is not just a necessary training tool for football players; it is a necessary tool for all ATHLETES to help prepare their bodies for the forces imposed in sport. And based on the current research, it is CRUCIAL we start making strength training a PRIORITY for today’s female athlete. (1)

In this article we are going to discuss:

  • When should females begin strength training programs
  • The ‘neuromuscular spurt’ girls need for athletic development
  • Common injuries and training techniques that reduce risk
  • How CULTURE has created a dangerous myth surrounding strength training for girls

Lifting the Myth: How Young is Too Young?

“The young bodies of modern day youth are often ill prepared to tolerate the demands of sports or physical activity.”

READ MORE AT: http://relentlessathleticsllc.com/2018/12/developing-the-young-female-athlete/

Contributed by: Emily R Pappas, MS Exercise Physiology

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Introducing the New Improved Content Player for Surgical Procedures in 3D

Dr. Brian Cole is proud to announce the release of his new and improved Content Player 3.0 for Surgical Procedures in 3D provided by Understand.com. The Player contains over 50 specific Orthopedic Surgical Procedures.

IMPROVEMENTS

  • 250% increase in content delivery and load speed
  • Enhanced responsiveness across a range of mobile devices
  • Better user experience and easier accessibility to all animations
  • Simplified social media sharing, integration, and customization
  • Animations can now be “Liked” and total number of views displayed

Produced by an experienced team of medical writers, 3D animators, and project managers with a detailed understanding of anatomy and surgery; they take complex surgical procedures and animate the steps to tell a visually stunning story in 3D that is both educational and entertaining. Each animation is embedded with an illustrated script which can be shared, viewed or printed separately.

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