Analyzing Chicago Bears Tight End Zach Miller’s Knee Injury

By Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush 

November 1, 2017

Will Chicago Bears tight end Zach Miller ever play in the NFL again?zach miller knee injury

Miller suffered one of the more gruesome injuries you will see in professional sports while trying to make a touchdown catch. Miller, a longtime NFL veteran, came down awkwardly on his left knee, suffering not only ligament damage, but also a torn popliteal artery that required emergency vascular surgery to repair.

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph and Dr. Nikhil Verma, both sports medicine orthopedic surgeons at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, joined local Chicago news affiliates to discuss Miller’s injury and what the recovery process will be like. Dr. Bush-Joseph says that the odds of Miller playing football in the NFL again are “very small.”


ABC 7 Chicago

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph sat down with ABC 7 Chicago’s Christian Farr to analyze Zach Miller’s knee injury.


FOX 32 Chicago

Dr. Nikhil Verma joined Good Day Chicago on Fox 32 Chicago to discuss Chicago Bears Zach Miller’s devastating injury to the knee.

Hear related interview with former Chicago Bear Otis Wilson in Episode 17.30 

 Athletico/Bank of America Marathon;  Kris Dunn’s Finger Injury; Post Marathon Recovery

Episode 17.27 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One (01:34): Travis Orth PT, DPT from Athletico Physical Therapy talks about the history and involvement of Athletico with the Bank of America Chicago Marathon: providing endurance program therapists; pre and post run medical services; free injury screening; video gait and form analysis; lectures on recovery.

Start line

Travis is an APTA Board Certified Orthopedic Specialist.  He also has advanced manual therapy training from the North American Institute of Orthopedic Manual Therapy.  In 2015 Travis was selected as one of three therapists nationally to participate in the prestigious Kevin Wilk Sports Travel Fellowship. His passion for sports medicine and scientific research is highlighted through over 10 publications, including 5 peer reviewed articles. He is an endurance specialist, published in both Triathlon and Running magazines.  He is also an accomplished Ironman and Boston Marathon qualifier.

Learn more about Athletico’s Endurance Rehabilitation Services


Segment Two (10:33): Bulls point guard Kris Dunn suffered an open dislocation of his left index finger during Chicago’s 114-101 preseason win over the Milwaukee Bucks, head coach Fred Hoiberg said. Dunn hurt his finger after trying to contest a dunk from Bucks shooting guard Sterling Brown. Dr. Cole explains the protocol in treating this type of injury and the fast work by his medical team to minimize the damage and pain.

An upbeat Kris Dunn addresses his future after finger injury


Segment Three (19.36):  Dr. Doug Adams PT, DPT, SCS, OCS, CSCS for ATI Physical Therapy discusses Post Marathon Recovery:

  1. What Happens to the body after marathon?
  2. How long does it take to recover?
  3. What can a runner do to speed up the recovery process?
  4. When should someone return to running after a marathon?

Dr. Doug Adams is a residency trained Physical Therapist with dual Board Certified Specialties in sports and orthopedics. Doug treats a largely athletic population from Olympic level to weekend warrior, with a focus on runners and triathletes. He created Trace3D, which is a portable 3D Motion Analysis System that is one of the first systems to allow access to 3D biomechanical data for athletes outside of a research or professional sports setting.

Doug also frequently lectures on sports medicine topics both locally and nationally, with multiple peer-reviewed publications. Doug is an Advisory Board Liaison and treats patients in Wilmington, DE for ATI Physical Therapy and is the Co-Founder of a Continuing Education Company called Association of Clinical Excellence.

See our Related ATI post: Tips for a Healthy Post-Marathon Recovery

Thoughts on Vegas, and Why Men Keep Doing This

While we acknowledge that this post may stray a bit from our usual content, in the wake of the Las Vegas tragedy we believe this provocative content is worth reading by our followers. Excerpts from the article by Charlie Hoehn on beyourself.

“There’s probably no way to ever know why a human being could do something like this to other human beings.”

Sadly, researchers know a lot about why human beings — particularly men — do things like this.

Why mass shootings keep happening

It’s tempting to say the mass shooter’s motive was simply “pure evil,” or to blame the media or guns, but that absolves us of looking deeply at what each of us — as individuals, family members, friends, and community members — might be missing.

1- Men in the United States are chronically lonely.

Boys in the United States — just like all human beings — need touch, caring, warmth, empathy, and close relationships. But as we grow up, most of us lose those essential components of our humanity. What’s worse: we have no idea how to ask for those things, or admit we need them, because we’re afraid it will make us look weak. As a man, you might be thinking, “Not me, I’ve got drinking buddies. I play poker with the guys. I’ve got friends.”

From an early age, we have an unhealthy ideal of masculinity that we try to live up to. Part of that ideal tells us that Real men do everything on their ownReal men don’t cry. Real men express anger through violence. The byproduct is isolation. Most men spend the majority of their adult lives without deeper friendships, or any real sense of community. Not to mention a complete inability to release anger or sadness in a healthy way.

There is a fantastic documentary called The Mask You Live In, which explains how boys in our society are ultimately shaped into mentally unstable adults. My friend Ryan recommended this film to me, after confiding that he cried throughout the entire thing. I cried, as well.


“We’re seeing a rise of loneliness and isolation. No one kills themselves when they’re hungry; we kill ourselves when we’re lonely. And we act out, as well.

  • In the 1960’s, there was one school shooting.
  • In the 1980’s, there were 27.
  • In the 1990’s, there were 58.
  • In the past decade, there have been over 120.

How do we combat the loneliness that kids are feeling? All of them attacked people in their own community, and all of them attack people they blamed for their own loneliness.”


This loneliness compounds as men grow older. Without deeper friendships or a strong sense of community, the isolation is soul-deadening and maddening. You are alone. Any slight from someone you care about can feel emotionally traumatizing. After enough rejections and feeling like an outcast, you begin to believe that people are just cruel and not worth the effort. You perceive people as threats.


2- Men in the United States are deprived of play opportunities.

Homo sapiens play more than any other species. It’s impossible to prevent a human from playing. We play shortly after we are born, and the healthiest (and least stressed) humans tend to play for their entire lives.

Play may be God’s greatest gift to mankind. It’s how we form friendships, and learn skills, and master difficult things that help us survive. Play is a release valve for stress, and an outlet for creativity. Play brings us music, comedy, dance, and everything we value.

Above all, play is how we bond with each other — it’s how we communicate “I am safe to be around, I am not a threat.” Play is how we form connections with other humans. The irony is that loneliness would not be a problem if we all got ample time to play. Not only would we have deeper friendships, we’d also have better relationships with ourselves. Play allows us to enjoy our own company.

There is a strong correlation with play deprivation and mental illness.

When you deprive mammals of play, it leads to chronic depression. When you deprive a human child of play, their mental and emotional health deteriorate. Play suppression has enormous health consequences.

This is in alignment with Dr. Peter Gray’s research, who studied the epidemic of mental illness and the decline in play:

“Over the past half century, in the United States and other developed nations, children’s free play with other children has declined sharply. Over the same period, anxiety, depression, suicide, feelings of helplessness, and narcissism have increased sharply in children, adolescents, and young adults… The decline in play has contributed to the rise in the psychopathology of young people.


This is why I believe mental illness may be the biggest health crisis of our lifetimes. Because those kids will grow up into isolated adults who don’t know how to play, or seek out their friends when they are lonely. They have no emotional support.

They are alone.


Universal among violent criminals was the fact that they were keeping a secret. A central secret. And that secret was that they felt ashamed— deeply ashamed, chronically ashamed, acutely ashamed.

ALL OF US will face difficult times in our lives where we will experience shame, humiliation, disrespect, and ridicule. Do you know what gets us through those hard times?

Friendship: The love and support you get, from the people you play with.

“I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was twelve. Jesus, does anyone?” — Stand by Me, final line

Whatever the case, these factors about mass shooters are often true:

  1. They are deeply lonely. They have no significant friendships to rely on, and very few quality people to confide in.
  2. They experienced ongoing play deprivation. Their innate ability was crippled, and they struggle to maintain a healthy emotional connection with themselves and others.
  3. They are deeply ashamed. They experienced extreme ridicule, rejection, or humiliation.

Are there other factors at play here?  Read the entire article here >>

Be Yourself

Concussions: Fact vs Fiction; ACL Repair; Chicago Sports Summit

Episode 17.25 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One (01:25): Dr. Tad Seifert, Neurology, Sports Medicine from Norton Concussions: Fact vs. fictionHealthcare talks about concussions and relationship to migraine headaches; prevalence in the lay athlete and elite athletes; fact vs fiction; management of concussions and migraines.

Dr. Tad Seifert a graduate of the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He completed his residency in neurology at the University of Texas-Houston and a subsequent fellowship in headache & facial pain at the renowned Houston Headache Clinic. Dr. Seifert currently serves as Director of Norton Healthcare’s Sports Neurology Program in Louisville, Kentucky.

Tad D. Seifert, M.D.

Dr. Seifert is an Independent Neurotrauma Consultant for the NFL and serves as Head of the NCAA’s Headache Task Force.  He is currently the Team Neurologist for a number of Kentucky and Indiana-based colleges and universities and is Chairman of the Kentucky Boxing & Wrestling Commission’s Medical Advisory Panel.

His research interests include post-traumatic headache in athletes as well as combat sports medicine.  Dr. Seifert cares for athletes of all ages and levels – from youth sports to professional leagues.

Related Articles:

Cuncussions: Fact vs Fiction

Counsel patients, parents on concussion risks in football


Segment Two (12:50): Steve talks with Dr. Cole about ACL repair in NBA athletes: description, causes, using grafts to rebuild the ACL, recovery and prognosis for rehab and return to play.

Image result for acl graft


Segment Three (21:00): Grant Koster from Athletico Physical Therapy and Dr. Cole talk about the Chicago Sports Summit to be held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel on October 4th from 8 AM to Noon. Grant will be one of the speakers from a list of prominent leaders in the community and sports. Watch the video about last year’s Summit and be sure to sign up for the 2nd annual Chicago Sports Summit.

Founded in 2016, the Chicago Sports Summit brings together several prominent politicians, business leaders and celebrities to discuss sports topics that impact the city of Chicago.

This year’s panels include:

  1. Curbing the Violence in Chicago: Empowering youth to participate in sports/activities, develop confidence and cultivate leadership skills. The panel will feature Chicago sports celebrities who are making a difference in the lives of Chicago teens.
  2. The Business of Sports Marketing: How the world’s largest and most recognizable brands leverage sports marketing to grow their business.
  3. The Science Behind Sports: The latest advances and how they play a role in endurance, performance, injury prevention, and recovery for athletes.

Chicago Sports SummitThe Sports Summit Foundation was formed as a continuation of a successful event held in 2016 called the Chicago Sports Summit. Part of the events promotion was that all net proceeds after direct expenses would be donated to a charity. At the conclusion of the event, over $30,000 was raised for After School Matters. After School Matters is a public charity that provides educational and recreational programs for Chicago area teenagers. The Foundation plans to continue it’s partnership with that organization and those similar for future contributions from the event.

This event attracted a wide range of sponsors and patrons to listen to a panel of professional sports executives, physicians, players and coaches who discussed both the business component of their sport as well as prevention and care of sports injuries. In addition to funding programs for youth education, The Sports Summit Foundation intends to also contribute toward non-profit research activity surrounding Orthopaedic care.

Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush is the main sponsor of this entity and we hope to add to our existing partners in future years as we award more donations and fulfill our mission.