Knee Cartilage Transplant Video Performed by Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Brian Cole

After a string of serious knee injuries, Mark, a 19-year-old college football player, faces an uncertain future playing the game he loves. In addition to the emotional toll the injuries have taken, Mark also endures unbearable knee pain.

To repair his knee, Mark undergoes a breakthrough knee cartilage transplant, performed by orthopedic surgeon Dr. Brian Cole, the Chicago Bulls’ team physician.

Do you want to learn more about knee cartilage transplantation? Click here to watch Dr. Cole on “The Doctors” treat a young college football player using this breakthrough surgery.


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White Sox phenom Michael Kopech likely needs reconstructive elbow surgery, will miss 2019 season

Chicago Tribune-September 8, 2018- Phil Rogers

Michael Kopech

Michael Kopech, the White Sox’s new Superman, has been cut down by a pitcher’s version of Kryptonite. He is believed to have torn the ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow, which could force him to undergo elbow reconstruction surgery and be sidelined until 2020.

It’s the same diagnosis that forced the Cubs’ Kerry Wood to undergo surgery after his Rookie of the Year season in 1998. More recently, the ligament transplant procedure known as Tommy John surgery has sidelined a long list of active major-leaguers, including Stephen Strasburg, Jacob deGrom, Yu DarvishJohnny CuetoCarlos CarrascoMichael Pineda and Adam Wainwright.

“Unfortunately, in this day and age, it’s a regular part of the game with pitchers,’’ Kopech said Friday. “Personally I never thought it would be something I would be going through. But it’s part of it.’’ Kopech becomes the fifth right-handed prospect ranked in the preseason top 100 by MLB Pipeline to suffer a serious elbow injury. He joins the Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, Cardinals’ Alex Reyes, Ray’s Brent Honeywell and Reds’ Hunter Greene in having their development delayed by Tommy John surgery.

The success rate of the surgery is good, especially for pitchers who haven’t had a previous elbow reconstruction, and the White Sox are confident Kopech will remain a major part of their future despite the specter of major elbow surgery. “This is by no means the last we’ve seen of Michael Kopech,’’ Sox general manager Rick Hahn said. “This is the last we’ve seen of him for ’18 and very likely for ’19, but he’s still going to play a significant role on what we project to be some very, very good White Sox teams in the future.”

Kopech experienced his first rough start in the major leagues on Wednesday night, giving up four home runs to the Tigers. It was seen as a minor blip until Friday, when orthopedic surgeon Nikhil Verma examined him and found a torn ulnar collateral ligament.  Hahn said an exam Friday “revealed a rather significant tear in his ulnar collateral ligament.’’ He will receive a second opElbow Thumbnailinion next week but it seems the only question is who will perform the surgery.

This development comes as a shock to both the team and Kopech, who at 22 has been one of the most intriguing young pitchers in baseball. “It has been a whirlwind of emotions for me in the past couple of weeks obviously,’’ Kopech said. “From just about my absolute peak to the absolute rock bottom. To say it’s unexpected would be an understatement.’’


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Research on GelrinC for the treatment of Articular Cartilage Defects in the Knee

This study evaluates the effectiveness of GelrinC in the treatment of cartilage damage in the knee. GelrinC is a synthetic material called PEG-DA combined with a natural protein called fibrinogen. Together, these materials form an implant which is inserted into the “hole” in your cartilage. As time goes on, new tissue forms around the implant and the implant gradually degrades so that eventually only the new tissue remains. This study hopes to find that the new tissue closely resembles your natural cartilage tissue, like the hole was never there in the first place.

Some patients with holes in their cartilage undergo a procedure called a microfracture, which stimulates the bone marrow within your knee bones to start the healing process. In this study, patients will have a microfracture procedure done with the additional implantation of the GelrinC. We will compare the results of the patients who received GelrinC to previous patients who only had the microfracture procedure. In an earlier clinical research study, GelrinC was shown to be safe for use and showed improvement in pain levels after surgery, symptoms and ability to do day to day activities.

Patients participating in the study answer questionnaires about their symptoms and functionality. Patients also undergo 4 MRI scans to evaluate how the knee is healing over the course of 5 years. There are 10 post-operative visits patients attend: 7 times within the first two years and then yearly at 3, 4 and 5 years.

NeoCart tissue implant for the treatment of articular cartilage injuries in the knee

This is a company-sponsored Phase 3, randomized research study evaluating an investigational treatment called NeoCart®, a tissue implant made from a patient’s own cells, aimed at repairing certain knee cartilage injuries. The study will look at damage to the knee’s hyaline articular cartilage, the smooth, white tissue that covers the ends of bones where they come together to form joints. Damage to this cartilage may be caused by an injury or repetitive motion.

It is a common problem that results in pain and symptoms, such as swelling, locking of the knee and loss of knee function. Damaged hyaline cartilage has limited capacity to repair or restore itself. Left untreated, the damage may progressively worsen and may lead to chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to learn about the safety and potential efficacy of the investigational cartilage tissue implant, NeoCart®, compared to microfracture, the current standard of care surgery for articular cartilage defects of the knee.

Patients who are between 18 and 59 years old and who have symptoms of pain in one knee may be candidates for this study will be screened for study recruitment. Accepted patients will have a two out of three chance of being treated with NeoCart® and a one out of three chance of receiving the microfracture procedure. Patients in each group will know their treatment group, have a specific rehabilitation program, and be evaluated periodically for three years after treatment.

The study sponsor is Histogenics, Corp. For more information, text knee1 to 87888, call (773)257-7057 or visit www.NeoCartImplant.com.

Read more about Clinical Trials and Ongoing Research Efforts under the direction of Dr. Brian Cole and the Cartilage Restoration Center Research Team at Rush.

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