White Sox phenom Michael Kopech likely needs reconstructive elbow surgery, will miss 2019 season

Chicago Tribune-September 8, 2018- Phil Rogers

Michael Kopech

Michael Kopech, the White Sox’s new Superman, has been cut down by a pitcher’s version of Kryptonite. He is believed to have torn the ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow, which could force him to undergo elbow reconstruction surgery and be sidelined until 2020.

It’s the same diagnosis that forced the Cubs’ Kerry Wood to undergo surgery after his Rookie of the Year season in 1998. More recently, the ligament transplant procedure known as Tommy John surgery has sidelined a long list of active major-leaguers, including Stephen Strasburg, Jacob deGrom, Yu DarvishJohnny CuetoCarlos CarrascoMichael Pineda and Adam Wainwright.

“Unfortunately, in this day and age, it’s a regular part of the game with pitchers,’’ Kopech said Friday. “Personally I never thought it would be something I would be going through. But it’s part of it.’’ Kopech becomes the fifth right-handed prospect ranked in the preseason top 100 by MLB Pipeline to suffer a serious elbow injury. He joins the Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, Cardinals’ Alex Reyes, Ray’s Brent Honeywell and Reds’ Hunter Greene in having their development delayed by Tommy John surgery.

The success rate of the surgery is good, especially for pitchers who haven’t had a previous elbow reconstruction, and the White Sox are confident Kopech will remain a major part of their future despite the specter of major elbow surgery. “This is by no means the last we’ve seen of Michael Kopech,’’ Sox general manager Rick Hahn said. “This is the last we’ve seen of him for ’18 and very likely for ’19, but he’s still going to play a significant role on what we project to be some very, very good White Sox teams in the future.”

Kopech experienced his first rough start in the major leagues on Wednesday night, giving up four home runs to the Tigers. It was seen as a minor blip until Friday, when orthopedic surgeon Nikhil Verma examined him and found a torn ulnar collateral ligament.  Hahn said an exam Friday “revealed a rather significant tear in his ulnar collateral ligament.’’ He will receive a second opElbow Thumbnailinion next week but it seems the only question is who will perform the surgery.

This development comes as a shock to both the team and Kopech, who at 22 has been one of the most intriguing young pitchers in baseball. “It has been a whirlwind of emotions for me in the past couple of weeks obviously,’’ Kopech said. “From just about my absolute peak to the absolute rock bottom. To say it’s unexpected would be an understatement.’’


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Research on GelrinC for the treatment of Articular Cartilage Defects in the Knee

This study evaluates the effectiveness of GelrinC in the treatment of cartilage damage in the knee. GelrinC is a synthetic material called PEG-DA combined with a natural protein called fibrinogen. Together, these materials form an implant which is inserted into the “hole” in your cartilage. As time goes on, new tissue forms around the implant and the implant gradually degrades so that eventually only the new tissue remains. This study hopes to find that the new tissue closely resembles your natural cartilage tissue, like the hole was never there in the first place.

Some patients with holes in their cartilage undergo a procedure called a microfracture, which stimulates the bone marrow within your knee bones to start the healing process. In this study, patients will have a microfracture procedure done with the additional implantation of the GelrinC. We will compare the results of the patients who received GelrinC to previous patients who only had the microfracture procedure. In an earlier clinical research study, GelrinC was shown to be safe for use and showed improvement in pain levels after surgery, symptoms and ability to do day to day activities.

Patients participating in the study answer questionnaires about their symptoms and functionality. Patients also undergo 4 MRI scans to evaluate how the knee is healing over the course of 5 years. There are 10 post-operative visits patients attend: 7 times within the first two years and then yearly at 3, 4 and 5 years.

NeoCart tissue implant for the treatment of articular cartilage injuries in the knee

This is a company-sponsored Phase 3, randomized research study evaluating an investigational treatment called NeoCart®, a tissue implant made from a patient’s own cells, aimed at repairing certain knee cartilage injuries. The study will look at damage to the knee’s hyaline articular cartilage, the smooth, white tissue that covers the ends of bones where they come together to form joints. Damage to this cartilage may be caused by an injury or repetitive motion.

It is a common problem that results in pain and symptoms, such as swelling, locking of the knee and loss of knee function. Damaged hyaline cartilage has limited capacity to repair or restore itself. Left untreated, the damage may progressively worsen and may lead to chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to learn about the safety and potential efficacy of the investigational cartilage tissue implant, NeoCart®, compared to microfracture, the current standard of care surgery for articular cartilage defects of the knee.

Patients who are between 18 and 59 years old and who have symptoms of pain in one knee may be candidates for this study will be screened for study recruitment. Accepted patients will have a two out of three chance of being treated with NeoCart® and a one out of three chance of receiving the microfracture procedure. Patients in each group will know their treatment group, have a specific rehabilitation program, and be evaluated periodically for three years after treatment.

The study sponsor is Histogenics, Corp. For more information, text knee1 to 87888, call (773)257-7057 or visit www.NeoCartImplant.com.

Read more about Clinical Trials and Ongoing Research Efforts under the direction of Dr. Brian Cole and the Cartilage Restoration Center Research Team at Rush.

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The Real Reason LeBron James Seems to Be Immune From Injuries

The NBA has seen nearly all of its top stars suffer from one injury or another over the past several years, except for, of course, LeBron James. While there is considerable evidence to suggest James is bionic in his 15th year, new clues have emerged.

According to his business partner Maverick Carter, anyone can maintain this level of health for 15 years as long as they are willing to spend $1.5 million a year on their body like James does.

This is due to his use of cryotherapy, hyperbaric chambers, and NormaTec leg boots.

What is a hyperbaric chamber?

In addition, James has personal chefs with a very strict diet. He does enjoy chicken breast and pasta before competition but added a few years ago, “a salad and some veggies will have me perfectly fine. And before the game I might have a protein shake and some fruit, and I’ll be ready to go. But as far as pies or pizza and sandwiches and french fries — I can’t. I’ll wait for that after the game. I can’t do that before the game.”

Based on his performance, to say this method is effective may be an understatement.

By:  for thebiglead.com

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Best Stretches for your Golf Game

By Brian Rog, Eric Buck MBA, ATC and Tyler Nohren, MS, ATC for ATI Physical Therapy

Best Stretches for your Golf Game by ATI Physical Therapy

How often do we find ourselves full-throttling it to the course, quickly slipping on the cleats and running at the pace of an Olympian to the first tee box? While we like to think that the run from the car to the first tee and those sweat-infused efforts at the range days before a round will translate into that once fantasized single digit handicap, the reality of the situation couldn’t be further disconnected from that fantasy.

Unfortunately, many of us overlook the simplest of necessities before squaring up on the first tee box – setting aside time to stretch! By not stretching, our bodies are never given that opportunity to properly adapt and adjust to the physical demands on the course, resulting in a serious lack of longevity, and ultimately distancing ourselves from that below-par round.

Let’s all make a promise to ourselves to weave in at least 30 minutes of stretching prior to that 18-hole adventure. Your body and scorecard are at the helm of your disciplinary skills, so take control of both and incorporate these stretches before and after a round. Take a look at the following short video where the reasons why and benefits of pre- and post-round stretches are discussed and demonstrated.

Golf pre-round stretches

  • Hip swing
  •  Trunk rotation
  •  Forearm strengthening
  •  Hamstrings and back

Following your round of golf, it’s not uncommon for aches and pains to creep up on you, so to combat these adversities, be sure to fit in time for the following stretches. Your body will thank you later!

Golf post-round stretches

  • Lat stretch
  •  Golfer’s elbow prevention

If aches and pains are getting in the way of your golf game, it’s time to take action. Stop by your nearest ATI Physical Therapy clinic for a complimentary injury screening where one of our licensed providers will take a look at your areas of discomfort and provide next-step suggestions in care.

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