How Stem Cells Will Shape Tomorrow’s Health Care

Experts discuss stem cell treatments for cancer, neurosurgery, orthopedics, pediatrics:

The use of stem cells in medical treatments already is yielding exciting results and may yield greater medical advances in the future. At a recent event hosted by Rush University Medical Center, experts at Rush discussed the role of stem cells in neurosurgery, orthopedics, pediatrics and oncology and how their breakthrough research may dramatically improve the lives of people afflicted by disease and severe injury. An edited transcript of that discussion appears here: https://www.rush.edu/news/how-stem-cells-will-shape-tomorrows-health-care.

Larry Goodman, MD, CEO of Rush University Medical Center and the Rush system, moderated the conversation. The panelists included Brian Cole, MD, MBA, professor in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery and section head of the Center for Cartilage Restoration at Rush; Richard G. Fessler, MD, PhD, professor in the Department of Neurological SurgeryTimothy M. Kuzel, MD, chief of the Division of Hematology, Oncology and Cell Therapy; and Anna Spagnoli, MD, the Woman’s Board Chair of the Department of Pediatrics.

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New 3D Animation on Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement

We are pleased to announce the latest addition to our 3D Animation Library on surgical procedures: Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement

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Introduction

Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement is a surgery performed toimprove shoulder function and decrease pain. This procedure is performed on patients who have suffered massive rotator cuff tears, which have led to a painful condition known as rotator cuff tear arthropathy, or on those patients who have undergone previously failed shoulder surgeries. The surgery removes damaged portions of the shoulder joint, and replaces them with a prosthesis.


Anatomy

There are three bones that are involved in the shoulder: the humerus, the scapula, and the clavicle. The head of the humerus rests in the socket of the scapula called the glenoid cavity.

The rotator cuff is made up of a group of four tendons from muscles that surround the shoulder joint, and together with the deltoid muscle, they work to stabilize the joint and move the arm.


Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement vs. Conventional
Shoulder Replacement

There are two types of total shoulder replacement surgery: conventional shoulder replacement and reverse shoulder replacement. The determination between which surgery should be performed is based upon the strength and functionality of the rotator cuff.

For many patients, the function of the rotator cuff has been compromised through massive tears, and the muscles and tendons do not function properly. In these cases, a conventional shoulder replacement may not be effective and reverse shoulder replacement may be an option.

In a reverse shoulder replacement prosthesis, the ball is placed on the shoulder socket while a cup and stem replace the head of the humerus. This configuration relies on the deltoid muscle instead of the rotator cuff to stabilize the shoulder and provide joint mobility. Additionally, this procedure may be recommended for individuals who have undergone previously unsuccessful conventional  shoulder replacement surgery.


Procedure

Depending upon your preference and that of the anesthesiologist, you will be put under general anesthesia and/or a nerve block. Your surgeon will make a single incision through the skin to access the shoulder joint.

Your arm is rotated and the head of the humerus is removed. Next, a space is created in the humerus and your surgeon will insert the stem portion of the prosthesis into the bone. The plastic cup then is fitted onto the humeral side.

Next, your surgeon will remove the damaged surface of the glenoid cavity. The first portion of the prosthesis is placed in the glenoid cavity and secured to the bone with screws.

Next, the “ball” portion of the implant is affixed to the previously placed glenoid prosthesis, and the arm is rotated to place the ball into the socket.

The incision is closed with internal sutures; and either external sutures, or staples. Finally, surgical tape or bandages will be placed over the incision.


Recovery and Results

Most patients return home within two to three days of the procedure. Any external staples or sutures that are present are usually removed in 10 days to two weeks. Scarring along your incision site is normal, but it is likely that your scars will fade
considerably over time.

Your arm will be in a sling after surgery and until your surgeon prescribes therapy. Depending upon your specific needs, your surgeon and physical therapist will develop an exercise routine to gradually increase your range of motion and strength. Your surgeon will recommend when you can return to work, daily activities, and driving; full recovery typically takes 6-8 months.


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Golf: Return to Play after Surgery, Winter Conditioning & New Teaching Technology; Avoiding Winter Sports Injuries

Episode 17.34 Rerun

Segment One (01:30): Dr. Nik Verma sitting in for Dr. Cole and Steve speakJames Standhardt with James Standhardt from GOLFTECabout returning to play after surgery, winter conditioning, importance of club fitting and new technology in golf instruction. James has taught for more than 14 years and has given over 19,000 lessons with GOLFTEC. Six time “Outstanding Achievement in Instruction” winner.


Segment Two (16:05): Dr. Julia Bruene from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about how to avoid skiing and other winter sports injuries.

Dr. Julia Bruene is a sports medicine physician with special interests in concussion management, care of female athletes, care of combat athletes/mixed martial arts, and special needs athletes.

In 2006, Dr. Bruene graduated magna cum laude earning her bachelor’s degree in health planning and administration, with a minor in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She went on to complete her medical degree at Rush University Medical College, Chicago, IL graduating in the top 20 percent of her class. Dr. Bruene served as chief resident in the Advocate Lutheran General Hospital Family Medicine Residency Program, Park Ridge, IL. She then completed a fellowship in primary care sports medicine at Rush University Medical Center.

A Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioner and recreational runner, Dr. Bruene understands how vital physical well-being is to athletes. Dedicated to keeping fellow sports enthusiasts healthy, Dr. Bruene volunteers to provide medical coverage for Chicago-area sporting events such as the Chicago Style Gymnastics Meet and Bank of America Chicago Marathon. She has also participated in team coverage for local area high school, college, and professional teams, and is a team physician for the Chicago White Sox.

Alternative Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Repairs

Dr. Brian Cole’s presentation on patient satisfaction and managing expectations delivered at the 2017 Chicago Sports Medicine Symposium.

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3D Animation on Torn ACL Procedures

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The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four ligaments that are crucial to the stability of your knee. It is a strong fibrous tissue that connects the femur to the tibia. A partial or complete tear of your ACL will cause your knee to become less stable and feel as though your knee is about to give out. The following videos will describe the different options available to repair or replace your torn ACL.

Visit  our Patient Education page for the full Library of 50 specific Orthopedic Surgical Procedures in 3D Animation. Produced by an experienced team of medical writers, 3D BCMD whiteanimators, and project managers with a detailed understanding of anatomy and surgery; they take complex surgical procedures and animate the steps to tell a visually stunning story in 3D that is both educational and entertaining. Each animation is embedded with an illustrated script which can be shared, viewed or printed separately.