Athletico’s Overhead Athlete Program

Matt Gauthier, PT, DPT, SCS from Athletico Physical Therapy talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about the unique characteristics of the Overhead Athlete, types of overhead throwing injuries: causes, prevention and treatment.

There’s more to throwing than just the motion of your arm.  There’s actually a whole science dedicated to it-and Athletico offers a comprehensive approach. Our team of physical therapists, occupational therapists, certified athletic trainers, and physical therapy assistants combine their expertise in throwing analysis with slow-motion video analysis to enhance performance and help prevent injuries.

Matt Gauthier specializes in the treatment of high-level athletes, and is the most passionate about treating shoulder and knee injuries. He is the head of Athletico’s Overhead Athlete Program,  and is a member of the USOC physical therapy volunteer program. As a sports specialist, he has experience treating athletic injuries at the youth, high school, college, professional, and Olympic levels.

Segment 102.1: Athletico’s Overhead Athlete Program

Matt Gauthier, PT, DPT, SCS from Athletico Physical Therapy talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about the unique characteristics of the Overhead Athlete, types of overhead throwing injuries: causes, prevention and treatment.

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There’s more to throwing than just the motion of your arm.  There’s actually a whole science dedicated to it-and Athletico offers a comprehensive approach. Our team of physical therapists, occupational therapists, certified athletic trainers, and physical therapy assistants combine their expertise in throwing analysis with slow-motion video analysis to enhance performance and help prevent injuries.

Whether you are returning from an injury or simply working to refine mechanics, Athletico has skilled professionals to assist you in optimizing your form and preparing your body for the field of competition, bringing you one step closer to making your goals a reality.

Matt Gauthier specializes in the treatment of high-level athletes, and is the most passionate about treating shoulder and knee injuries. He is the head of Athletico’s Overhead Athlete Program,  and is a member of the USOC physical therapy volunteer program. As a sports specialist, he has experience treating athletic injuries at the youth, high school, college, professional, and Olympic levels.

First-Ever National Study Shows Majority of Paddle Tennis Players Sustained Injuries Related to Playing

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The first-ever national study of platform (paddle) tennis injuries revealed 66 percent of paddle tennis players say they sustained an injury from playing the game. The study also found that of the platform tennis players reporting an injury, more than half sustained two or more.

The most common conditions reported were injuries to the shin/calf (21%), knee (16%), elbow (16%), ankle (13%) and shoulder (10%). Sixty percent of the injuries were caused by overuse and 40 percent were due to an incident that occurred during play. The study, which involved an online survey of American Platform Tennis Association players nationwide, was coordinated by Dr. Leda Ghannad, a sports medicine physician at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, with approval from the internal review board at Rush University Medical Center. More than 1,000 players responded to the survey.

“We knew it was a high-injury sport based on the number of paddle patients we treat,” admits Dr. Ghannad. “But until now, there wasn’t any research that proved this. Paddle tennis requires a mixture of speed, agility and quick bursts of energy, which makes athletes more susceptible to getting hurt. Many players are also middle-aged ‘weekend warriors’ who don’t strengthen or stretch their muscles and ligaments in between games or practices.”

Paddle tennis is similar to tennis but is played outside in the winter on a small, elevated court surrounded by a screen. Courts are heated from underneath to clear snow and ice. Most participants are between the ages of 40 and 65.


“Platform tennis is a great way to get exercise in the winter and I don’t want to discourage anyone from playing it,” explains Dr. Ghannad. “However, because of the high injury rate, it is critical to incorporate warm up exercises and prevention strategies into your routine.”


If you suffer an injury from platform tennis, call the MOR platform injury appointment line:  855-603-4141.

The Growth of Platform Tennis; Review of the NBA Research Committee

Episode 17.05 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:20): Dr. Jeremy Alland from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about the definition and growth of Platform Tennis, unusually high rate of related injuries and the importance of warming up prior to play. Dr. Alland graduated from Rush Medical College in Chicago, IL, where he was awarded the prestigious William H. Harrison, PhD Award for selfless leadership, aspiration and collaboration. He went on to complete a Family Medicine residency at UPMC St. Margaret Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA, where he served as Chief Resident and was peer-selected as the best resident teacher.

ABC7’s Judy Hsu reports on the growing popularity of platform tennis, which is played outdoors in the winter. Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush recently completed the first-ever national survey of ‘paddle tennis’ players who reported that two-thirds had sustained an injury due to the sport. Of those, one half had sustained more than one injury. Dr. Jeremy Alland, sports  medicine physician, talks about the risk of the sport and platform tennis players talk about what keeps them coming back.

Segment Two (13:50): Dr. Cole as Chairman of the NBA Research Committee andImage result for nba injuries Steve Kashul discuss the work of the committee in tracking and sharing data on performance and injuries in the NBA; how this data is used to minimize future injuries and maximize the performance of valuable professional players.

The initiative is in partnership with General Electric Healthcare. It is spearheaded by a 20-person strategic advisory board comprising team physicians and clinical researchers from various fields, including orthopedics, sports medicine, radiology and epidemiology.

 “NBA players are among the best athletes in the world, and their well-being is the league’s highest priority,” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said in a statement released to ESPN.com. “Our support for medical research through our partnership with GE Healthcare will help us improve the long-term health and wellness of NBA players. We are also excited that this research collaboration will provide important insights to athletes at all levels.”