From head to toe, swimmers must kick the injuries and pain to get to the top

By Julie Gardner for ATI Physical Therapy

From head to toe, swimmers must kick the injuries and pain to get to the top

While many probably consider swimming a relatively safe sport, injuries can still put these athletes in hot water.  Katie Varnado, ATC from the ATI Sports Medicine department knows about swimming injuries first hand from her work with these athletes.  Here’s what Katie has to say…

What injuries are common…

  • Swimmer’s Shoulder:  The shoulder is the joint most commonly injured, and may include rotator cuff impingement, biceps tendinitis and shoulder instability.  All can result from overuse, fatigue and weakness, especially when proper techniques are not used.
  • Swimmer’s Knee:  This injury occurs during the breaststroke because of the “whip kick,” which places all of the force of the kick on the outside of the knee. The inner ligament of the knee, called the medial collateral ligament, is put under stress.
  • Other Lower Body Injuries: Breaststrokers may experience pain from inflammation of the hip tendons. Lower back disk problems or spondylolisis, a stress fracture in the vertebrae of the spine, may be caused by the dolphin kick.

Prevention…

Katie recommends these tips to help prevent injury. In addition to stretching, there are specific things a diver can do to help ward off a repetitive injury:

  • Understand and focus on proper stroke techniques
  • Lessen repetitive strokes that are causing the  overuse injury
  • Perform core strengthening and cross-training exercises as part of pre and early season routines
  • Be sure to warm-up and cool down after activity and use periods of rest to recover
  • Focus efforts on rotator cuff and scapular strengthening for most shoulder injuries,  and pelvic and hip strengthening exercises for hip and knee injuries
  • Speak with a sports medicine professional or athletic trainer if you have questions  about injuries, exercises and  prevention

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Segment 101.1: Olympic Swimmer Dara Torres on Sports Medicine Weekly

Dara Torres talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about her experiences in Olympic competition, her current fitness routine and the challenges facing women in sports today.

Dara Torres, Olympic Swimmer

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Olympic Icon Dara Torres who is considered one of the greatest female competitive swimmers of all-time. She entered her first international swimming competition at age 14 and competed in her first Olympic Games a few years later in 1984.

At the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing, Dara became the oldest swimmer ever to compete in the Olympic Games at age 41. She took home 3 Silver Medals, including the heartbreaking 50-meter freestyle race where she missed another Gold Medal by a mere 1/100th of a second. America has fallen in love with Dara for her astonishing accomplishments and her composure in the face of defeat.

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Can Exercise Help with Arthritis Pain?

By Tara Hackney, PT, DPT, OCS, KTTP for Athletico Physical Therapy

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis. The degenerative joint disease is due to a breakdown of cartilage. Arthritis can occur in many joints including the hands, hips, knees, lower back, neck and shoulders.

OA can cause pain, swelling and stiffness in joints. OA is a chronic condition and occurs over time as the cartilage in the joints wears away. OA is frequently associated with older age, but can start in your 20s or 30s. Due to the symptoms of OA, physical activity can become more difficult but exercise can actually help alleviate some of these symptoms.

How can exercise help improve symptoms of arthritis?

Exercise can help to improve joint pain and improve range of motion. The key to working out when you have OA is to select exercises that you can do comfortably and perform consistently. One of the most effective ways to reduce the pressure placed on your joints, especially those in the lower extremity, is to maintain a healthy weight. With each pound of excess weight lost, there is a four-fold decrease in the load on your joints.

Oftentimes, OA joint pain can make high impact activities, such as running, too painful. However there are low impact activities that are great options, including biking, swimming or walking. Those with joint pain may also see benefits from varying their routine – such as walking one day and switching to swimming the next day – to avoid joint overuse from repetition. It is important to note that it is recommended to consult with your doctor before starting a new workout routine or trying new exercises.

Tips for Exercising with Osteoarthritis

  • Yoga or Tai Chi
    • These activities can help improve balance and strengthen muscles that support the hip and knee joints.
  • Aquatic Classes
    • Exercising in water is great for those with moderate to severe OA pain. The water provides buoyancy and therefore less stress on the joints. The water is also usually warm which can help improve joint mobility.
  • Stretching
    • Stretching can help improve joint range of motion and relieve tight muscles that may be limiting joint range. Stretching should be performed both prior to and following a workout. Read, “Warming Up vs Cooling Down: Things to Know” to learn more about the benefits of stretching before and after activity.
  • Go Slow, Move Gentle
    • Exercise with slow and easy movements, and also move gently to warm your joints up. Performing range of motion exercises for 10 minutes is a great way to start a workout prior to progressing to aerobic or strengthening exercises. If you feel pain, take a break or back off.
  • Heat Before and Ice After
    • Heat can help relax the joints and muscles and can help you begin your workouts. Applying ice after a workout can help alleviate soreness and potential swelling in joints following activity.

Be Consistent

Keep in mind that a lack of exercise can actually make joints even more painful and stiff. When you do not exercise, the muscles that support your joints are weaker and can cause more stress on your joints.  Remember to trust your body and do not push your joints too far. Easing into a new routine and progressing slowly with intensity and duration is key. If you would like more guidance for workouts with arthritis, please find your local Athletico to request an appointment.

REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT

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The Olympic Experience with Dara Torres; Clinical Trials & Research; Benefits of Coconut Water

Episode 17.33 Rerun

Segment One (01:40): Dr. Nik Verma sits in for Dr. Brian Cole, with Steve Kashul and talks with Dara Torres, 5 Time Olympian Swimmer/12 time Medalist. Dara talks about her competition experience and training routines over the years.

Dara Torres is arguably the fastest female swimmer in America. She entered her first international swimming competition at age 14 and competed in her first Olympic Games a few years later in 1984.

At the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008, Dara became the oldest swimmer to compete in the Olympic Games. When she took three silver medals home – including the infamous heartbreaking 50-meter freestyle race where she missed the Gold by 1/100th of a second – America loved her all the more for her astonishing achievement and her good-natured acceptance of the results.

 

In total, Dara has competed in five Olympic Games and has won 12 medals in her entire Olympic career. Her impressive performance in Beijing and her attempt at the 2012 London Olympic Games has inspired many older athletes to consider re-entering competition.

Career Highlights

  • 2009 U.S. Nationals Gold Medalist in 50m Freestyle
  • 2009 World Championships (8th 50m Freestyle, 4th 4×100 Freestyle)
  • Five-Time Olympian; 12-Time Medalist
  • First U.S. swimmer to compete in 5 Olympics
  • U.S. Record Holder in 50m Freestyle
  • Broadcast: NBC, ABC, NBC, ESPN & more.

Segment Two (13:18): Dr. Nik Verma talks with Steve about the importance of clinical trials and research, translational research, current studies in biologics and the use of stem cells. Currently, Dr. Verma maintains an active clinical practice performing over 500 procedures per year. He is Director of the Division of Sports Medicine and Director of the Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. In addition, he serves as a team physician for the Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls, and Nazareth Academy.nikhil verma

In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Verma is actively involved in orthopedic research with interests in basic science, biomechanics and clinical outcomes, and has recently received funding for his work from Major League Baseball.

He has authored multiple peer-reviewed manuscripts in major orthopedic and sports medicine journals, numerous book chapters, and routinely serves as teaching faculty for orthopedic courses on advanced surgical techniques. He frequently serves as an invited speaker or guest surgeon for national and international orthopedic sports medicine meetings.


Segment Three (19:07): Scott Sandler, President & CEO of COCO5 talks about the benefits of coconut water for professional athletes and weekend warriors & how COCO5 Coconut Water differs from other hydration products.

GREAT TASTING, NATURAL HYDRATION

COCO5 combines the powerful hydrating properties of young coconut water with all natural flavors to create a hydration beverage perfect for any time of day or night. Clean, refreshing and brilliantly delicious. Nothing artificial. Ever.

COCO5 replenishes the body with all 5 essential electrolytes your body needs. Magnesium, Sodium, Potassium, Chloride and Calcium.

  1. Eliminate chemical additives, dyes and high fructose corn syrup found in leading fluid replacement beverages. 
  2. Replace fluids lost through sweat.
  3. Restore electrolytes depleted during exercise.
  4. Reduce cramping and gastric distress often experienced with conventional sports drinks.
  • All Natural ingredients
  • Benefits come from coconut water, not artificially added ingredients or chemicals
  • Unlike other hydration drinks, the electrolytes in COCO5 are naturally occurring (sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chloride and small amounts of other nutrients)
  • Colors and flavors are from natural fruits and vegetables
  • No artificial dyes (i.e., Red40, Bluel, Yellow5)
  • No artificial sweeteners. Stevia (Rebiana) is used as a sweetener from a plant (no artificial sweeteners such as Sucralose, Aspartame or Acesulfame potassium as found in other hydration drinks)
  • Maximum absorption due to the balance of carbohydrates and electrolytes
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