These 3 Surprising Workouts Are the Best For Your Health, Says Harvard

There’s nothing like a multitasking sweat session to help us burn calories, banish stress, and clear our minds. But as Business Insider reports, not all fitness routines are created equal. A new health report released by Harvard Medical School titled “Starting to Exercise” outlined the most effective workouts that not only aid in weight loss, but also help strengthen your brain, bones, and heart.

“Research shows that just a half-hour of moderately intense exercise a day can improve your health and extend your life,” the report says. I-Min Lee, a Harvard professor and author of the study, notes that activities like long-distance running can have negative effects on your digestive system and joints. In addition to explaining the best ways to avoid injuries and use the proper breathing techniques, the research also reveals some of the most beneficial workouts for your health—and a few of them may surprise you. Read on below for three routines that help you live longer and only require 30 minutes of your time.

Walking. This activity may seem like a no-brainer, but as Business Insider reports, some studies have found that walking for at least 30 minutes at a leisurely pace can help boost your memory and reduce depression. For those who don’t exercise regularly, Harvard suggests starting off with 10- to 15-minute strolls and building up to 30- to 60-minute walks.

Tai chi. A Chinese martial and meditative art that involves a series of gentle and flowing movements, this ancient practice emphasizes deep focus and paying attention to breathing. Lee writes that tai chi is “particularly good for older people because balance is an important component of fitness, and balance is something we lose” as we age.

Swimming. Harvard’s Healthbeat newsletter calls swimming “the perfect workout,” all thanks to its ability to work almost every muscle in your body. From protecting your brain from signs of aging to raising your heart rate, this aerobic workout also reduces potential injuries “because it’s less weight bearing,” Lee writes in a recent issue of the newsletter.

By DANIELLE DIRECTO-MESTON

Patient Completes Ironman after Knee Replacement

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Several years ago, lifelong swimmer Laura Parker, now 47, of St. Charles, IL, took an interest in running because some friends were competing in a local triathlon. Training for this event got her hooked on competing and since 2009 she has completed four Ironman triathlons – the most difficult of all triathlons.

Her fourth triathlon was very special.

In an Ironman, competitors complete a 2.4-mile swim,112-mile bike and 26.2-mile run. – a total of 140.6 miles.

It’s all about training and committing to a process. “Training is harder than the race,” says Parker. “It’s not about racing against them, it’s a race against yourself.”

The training did take a toll on her body, however. Her first Ironman left her with knee pain that made it difficult to walk. She went for an MRI, which revealed that she had end stage arthritis in all three compartments of her left knee.

Heeding her doctor’s recommendation, Laura did physical therapy for six weeks to strengthen her vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a muscle located just above the kneecap.  She then went back to training but the pain worsened.

Eventually, even though she did two more Ironman competitions, it became increasingly harder to train, walk and perform every day activities. Then, in 2016, her doctor recommended a total knee replacement.

Laura immediately began her research to find the best surgeon for this procedure. One of her cycling friends had great success at Midwest Orthopedics at Rush, so she started there.

She discovered Dr. Craig DellaValle, a top ranked hip and knee replacement doctor, set up an appointment, and felt confident to that he was an excellent choice. She was excited to get back to pain-free training, but exactly what kind, she wasn’t yet sure. She was hoping to compete in another Ironman competition and discussed this in detail with Dr. DellaValle.

Laura’s knee replacement surgery went very well and she began stretching, lifting lightweights and was eventually able to start fully training again. She did so well that, eventually, Dr. Della Valle approved her to compete as long as she walked in the running portion of the races.

Laura did accomplish her goal of competing in yet another Ironman. She successfully completed her fourth in January 2017, a year and a half post- surgery.


“Being able to say you did an Ironman after surgery is a great reward,” she explains.


Next up for Laura is the biking season.  She will take a year off from the Ironman, but plans to resume them again in 2019.

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“Getting your knee replaced is not a death sentence when it comes to your activity at all,” she explains. “Adjust your expectations and commit!”


For more information on keeping your knees healthy, visit www.kneesforlife.org. For an appointment with Dr. Craig Della Valle, call 877-MD-BONES. Visit www.dellavalleortho.com for more information.

What is Aquaboom?; Treating ACL and Meniscus Tears; Treating Tendonitis and Tendon Tears

Episode 17.15 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:58): Matt Kredich, Executive Director at Tennessee Aquatics,Photos from AQUA BOOM's post Knoxville and USA Swimming; American Swim Coaches Association World Clinic Speaker. Matt describes the Aqua Boom training device for upper and lower body training and rehab using variable and progressive water resistance; converting a pool into a complete gym.


Segment Two (10:29): Dr. Cole and Steve talk about the causes and treatments for ACL and Meniscus tears in elite athletes as well as the general population.

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Segment Three (18:50): Dr. Cole describes the anatomy of tendonitis, the various types of injuries and tendon tears and the various treatment alternatives.

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5 Ways to Maximize Triathlon Performance

5 ways to maximize triathlon performance

By Ryan Domeyer PT, DPT, CMPT for Athletico Physical Therapy

Participation in triathlons in the United States is at an all-time high according to USA Triathlon, the sport’s governing body in the United States. The group’s membership has swelled from around 100,000 in 1998 to 550,446 in 2013.1 What’s more, estimates from the Sports and Fitness Industry Associated show there were 2,498,000 road triathletes  in the United States in 2016.2

With the number of participants in triathlon races increasing, it is important to have a training plan in order to prevent injury and maximize performance on race day. There are numerous training plans and philosophies available to follow, but many are missing valuable components that can improve performance and decrease the risk of injury. Read below for five things to include in your training program in order to maximize triathlon performance.

1. Bicycle Fitting

Bicycles should be comfortable and fitted into a position that maximizes force output. There are multiple variables including saddle height, stem height and handlebar height that should be taken into consideration. Small changes in position on the bicycle can lead to large changes in muscle efficiency, which can help athletes maximize speed with less energy. For help with bike set up, athletes can seek out assistance from a local bicycle store or certified triathlon coach.

2. Running Form

Although most triathlon plans will include weekly running, few address proper form and how to run more efficiently to decrease force applied to the joints. Research shows that increasing cadence, or the number of steps taken, can decrease loading on the foot, knee and hip – which may lead to less overuse injuries.3  An easy way to track cadence is by using a metronome smartphone app. These apps can help to determine current steps per minute, and athletes can use this as a benchmark to start increasing their steps in 5 percent increments up to 170-190 steps per minute.

Another way to improve running form is by using Video Gait Analysis (VGA). This service can be used to analyze running under slow motion in order to identify areas of improvement that can help to prevent injuries and maximize performance. Physical therapists at Athletico Physical therapy are qualified to perform VGA and work with athletes to create plans for more efficient running through training and on race day.

3. Joint Mobility

Swimming, bicycling and running all utilize joints differently. Most training plans will outline the importance of stretching, but few people follow those recommendations. An easy way to prepare your joints for training is by utilizing a dynamic warm up to prepare the body for training. Learn more about the difference between stretching and a dynamic warm up by reading Athletico’s “Stretching Vs. Warming Up: What’s the Difference?

4. Strength Training

A  deficit in many triathlon training programs is the absence of strength training. Most programs include swimming, biking and running, but end up omitting ways to maintain or improve strength. The goal should not be to increase muscle size but rather to maintain strength to allow for maximum performance while training. Including bodyweight squats, lunges, planks and gluteal muscle strength is a great way to build a resilient body to prevent injuries while training.

5. Body Awareness

Triathlon training requires a large commitment in time and physical capacity. Being aware of when aches and pains are becoming injuries is vital to maximizing performance. Understanding of when to recover and when to push through aches is important to maximizing performance on race day. Physical therapists at Athletico are experts in musculoskeletal injuries and are available for complimentary injury screens to determine the best plan to prevent/treat injuries and maximize overall performance.

Schedule a Complimentary Injury Screen