About NCSA – The largest and most successful athletic recruiting network

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph and Steve Kashul talk with Debbie Garr, mother of NCSA student-athlete Erin Garr about the Garr family experience working with NSCA since January 2018 to help direct Erin’s athletic future.

Headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, NCSA is now the world’s largest and most successful college athletic recruiting network. With a network of 35,000 college coaches and more than 700 employees, NCSA assists student-athletes in 34 sports find their best path to college.

Bringing Process, Technology, and Passion to Recruiting

In 2000, NCSA became the first company to challenge the status quo and bring digital technology to the antiquated, paper-based recruiting world. The innovation did not stop there. A year before the creation of YouTube, NCSA was the first to offer online highlight video access to college coaches. New technology and data also helped create a recruit match system that helps athletes determine their best college options.

One of NCSA’s strengths has always been its strong relationship with the college coach community. It’s a level of trust that has been built over time and maintained with performance. Today, there are more than 35,000 college coaches in our network. But what really drives success for NCSA and its clients is the passionate team of former college coaches and athletes who use their firsthand knowledge and expertise to help athletes at every step in the recruiting process.Home

Since 2000, more than 100,000 NCSA clients have reported their commitment to a college team.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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Treating Concussions with Physical Therapy

Dr. Nikhil Verma from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush and Steve Kashul talk with Kim Smith from Athletico Physical Therapy about how to identify concussion symptoms and how physical therapy can help with the side effects of concussions. Kim Smith is the facility manager and Illinois Vestibular & Concussion Coordinator at Athletico Physical Therapy.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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When Turf Toe Strikes, You’ll Know What To Do

Turf toe is not a term you want to use when talking to a ballerina before her diva debut or a head football coach about his star running back.

“Turf toe” is the common term used to describe a sprain of the ligaments around the big toe joint. Although associated with athletes who play sports on artificial turf or hard surfaces, such as soccer, basketball, wrestling, gymnastics, and dance, it can happen to anyone! It’s a condition that’s caused by jamming the big toe or repeatedly pushing off the big toe forcefully as in running and jumping.

What Causes Turf Toe?

Turf toe is a sprain to the ligaments around the big toe joint, which works primarily as a hinge to permit up and down motion.

Just behind the big toe joint in the ball of your foot are two pea-shaped bones embedded in the tendon that moves your big toe called sesamoids. These bones work like a pulley for the tendon and provide leverage when you walk or run. They also absorb the weight that presses on the ball of the foot.

When you are walking or running, you start each subsequent step by raising your heel and letting your body weight come forward onto the ball of your foot. At a certain point you propel yourself forward by “pushing off” of your big toe and allowing your weight to shift to the other foot. If the toe for some reason stays flat on the ground and doesn’t lift to push off, you run the risk of suddenly injuring the area around the joint. Or if you are tackled or fall forward and the toe stays flat, the effect is the same as if you were sitting and bending your big toe back by hand beyond its normal limit, causing hyperextension of the toe. That hyperextension, repeated over time or with enough sudden force, can — cause a sprain in the ligaments that surround the joint.

What Are the Symptoms of Turf Toe?

The most common symptoms of turf toe include pain, swelling, and limited joint movement at the base of one big toe. The symptoms develop slowly and gradually get worse over time if it’s caused by repetitive injury. If it’s caused by a sudden forceful motion, the injury can be painful immediately and worsen within 24 hours. Sometimes when the injury occurs, a “pop” can be felt. Usually the entire joint is involved, and toe movement is limited.

How Is Turf Toe Diagnosed?

To diagnose turf toe, the doctor will ask you to explain as much as you can about how you injured your foot and may ask you about your occupation, your participation in sports, the type of shoes you wear, and your history of foot problems.

The doctor will then examine your foot, noting the pattern and location of any swelling and comparing the injured foot to the uninjured one. The doctor will likely ask for an X-ray to rule out any other damage or fracture. In certain circumstances, the doctor may ask for other imaging tests such as a bone scanCT scan, or MRI.

How Is Turf Toe Treated?

The basic treatment for treating turf toe, initially, is a combination of rest, ice, compression, and elevation (remember the acronym R.I.C.E).This basic treatment approach is to give the injury ample time to heal, which means the foot will need to be rested and the joint protected from further injury. The doctor may recommend an over-the-counter oral medication such as ibuprofen to control pain and reduce inflammation. To rest the toe, the doctor may tape or strap it to the toe next to it to relieve the stress on it. Another way to protect the joint is to immobilize the foot in a cast or special walking boot that keeps it from moving. The doctor may also ask you to use crutches so that no weight is placed on the injured joint. In severe cases, an orthopaedic surgeon may suggest a surgical intervention.

It typically takes two to three weeks for the pain to subside. After the immobilization of the joint ends, some patients require physical therapy in order to re-establish range of motion, strength, and conditioning of the injured toe.

Can Turf Toe Be Prevented?

One goal of treatment should be to evaluate why the injury occurred and to take steps to keep it from reoccurring. One way to prevent turf toe is to wear shoes with better support to help keep the toe joint from excessive bending and force with pushing off. You may also want to consider using specially designed inserts that your doctor or physical therapist can prescribe for you.

A physical therapist or a specialist in sports medicine can also work with you on correcting any problems in your gait that can lead to injury and on developing training techniques to help reduce the chance of injury.

 Contributed by Aetrex

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Donation Comes Full Circle For Tissue Recipient Turned Doctor

As a soccer player for the University of Illinois, Rachel constantly pushed herself. Being active was crucial to her lifestyle both on and off the soccer field. She was also passionate about medicine, but didn’t know yet that she would eventually be on both sides of the operating table.

After a partial lateral meniscus tear put her on the sidelines, she underwent an arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy. She returned to soccer and her pre-injury level of play until she tore her remaining meniscus.

Her pain subsided after an arthroscopic procedure to have the non-viable tissue removed, but then her knee issues returned. “Being unable to remain physically fit, or lead an active lifestyle, became a huge problem for me,” she said. “As sports and fitness, particularly soccer, were such huge components of my life, I was extremely frustrated with my knee.”

When Rachel met with Dr. Brian Cole of Rush University Medical Center, she learned she was a candidate for a meniscus transplant. Since donor meniscus tissue is matched to the recipient by size, she was placed on a waiting list. Three weeks before starting medical school, she received her match.

In addition to balancing her recovery and a strict physical therapy regimen, Rachel focused on medical school.  She also began running again and completed the Chicago Triathlon in 2008.

Throughout the course of medical school, Rachel’s experience with allograft transplantation stayed with her and would eventually help shape the course of her career. “As a direct reflection of my fascination with musculoskeletal function laid against the backdrop of my own patient experiences, I pursued a yearlong Orthopaedic Research Fellowship within the Division of Sports Medicine in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Rush University Medical Center,” she explained.

During her research year, Rachel started training for and subsequently completed the Hawaii Half-Ironman. While she was preparing for the race, some of her knee symptoms came back. After the race, she required a revision of the meniscus allograft and received a lateral femoral condyle osteochondral allograft. “Ever since the revision surgery, I have been functioning at an incredibly high level,” Rachel said.

Now an orthopedic surgery resident at Rush University Medical Center, Rachel works alongside Dr. Cole, the surgeon who helped her heal. Many of her research projects involve allograft applications and her experience as an allograft recipient provides a unique connection to her patients in need of a tissue transplant.  “The allograft has allowed me to be a surgeon, permitting me to stand for over 12 hours in the operating room without thinking about my knee because I have literally no pain or swelling,” she said. “Before the allograft transplantation, there is no way I would have been able to do this. I am incredibly grateful for my tissue donors and their families. This gift has inspired me to pursue my passion for orthopaedic and sports medicine and to help my future patients the same way Dr. Cole and his team helped me.”

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