DEVELOPING THE YOUNG FEMALE ATHLETE

In 2011, Naomi Kutin broke a world powerlifting record, squatting 215 lbs. She was in the 97 lbs weight clas…and was just nine years old. She broke a record previously held by a 44 year old German woman. Since then, Naomi has become a prodigy with the nickname “Supergirl” in the lifting community. Now, at 16, she has continued to astound, deadlifting 365 lbs in the last Pan American Championships with Team USA.

As you look at your own daughter, you’re probably thinking, “Thank goodness my daughter wants to play softball… “Aren’t girls like Naomi a special case?” And…most importantly, “Is what Naomi doing in that video EVEN SAFE???” As parents, coaches, trainers…we all walk a fine line. We want to keep young athletes from the life-long consequences of injury but we still want to help them be their best. Especially if they LOVE their sport. No one wants to put out the fire of a young athlete. But when is it our responsibility to draw the line? How can we prepare our young athletes for the risks of their sport?

Until recently, strength training and young athletes has been a taboo subject. Even more so for females. Most parents have no problems signing their daughter up for softball or soccer, but strength training? It just doesn’t happen that easily. Here’s the problem: Our girls are getting hurt.  In soccer. In softball. In volleyball. And, our girls are getting hurt more often- and worse -than our boys.

With more females participating in sports over the last decade, science has devoted a greater focus to female athletes and their development. Currently, data for gender-matched sports show females present a higher incidence of injuries than male athletes. And when we think about it….it makes sense!!! We KNOW that male athletes have more muscle mass and a baseline of strength due to their hormonal makeup (hello higher testosterone!).

YET in gender-matched sports with similar rules (ie softball/ baseball, basketball, soccer, lacrosse, volleyball, etc), males and females are exposed to the SAME FORCES on the field or court. But we keep throwing our comparatively weaker females on to this field or court.

It’s no wonder our female athletes keep getting injured!

Girls are seeing an increase in injury in sports, particularly

  • stress fractures,
  • ACL tears,
  • and other knee injuries like PFPS (patellofemoral pain syndrome)

What’s the solution? How can we prepare young female athletes for a healthy athletic career?

Strength Training.

The science is clear: strength training is not just a necessary training tool for football players; it is a necessary tool for all ATHLETES to help prepare their bodies for the forces imposed in sport. And based on the current research, it is CRUCIAL we start making strength training a PRIORITY for today’s female athlete. (1)

In this article we are going to discuss:

  • When should females begin strength training programs
  • The ‘neuromuscular spurt’ girls need for athletic development
  • Common injuries and training techniques that reduce risk
  • How CULTURE has created a dangerous myth surrounding strength training for girls

Lifting the Myth: How Young is Too Young?

“The young bodies of modern day youth are often ill prepared to tolerate the demands of sports or physical activity.”

READ MORE AT: http://relentlessathleticsllc.com/2018/12/developing-the-young-female-athlete/

Contributed by: Emily R Pappas, MS Exercise Physiology

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Does Female Teen-Aged Development Change Hip and Knee Landing Biomechanics: Are there Implications for Knee Injury?

Knee injuries in adolescent females, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, are increasing in frequency. One of the suspected causes is poor landing technique characterized by ‘knock-knee’ posture. Pubertal development is associated with rapid growth of the long bones and surrounding soft tissue and is thought to be an underlying contributor to poor knee and lower limb biomechanics. Yet, no previous studies have investigated the effects of female pubertal development stages on knee and hip biomechanics during a single-limb landing task.

In this study of 93 healthy and physically active girls, the investigators grouped subjects according to pre-pubertal, early/mid-pubertal and late/post-pubertal development stages. All girls had their hip and knee biomechanics recorded with three-dimensional (3-D) motion analysis and force-plate technology while they completed a single-limb landing task. This experimental task was designed to mimic the mechanism of traumatic sporting knee injuries. Girls at latter stages of puberty were heavier, taller and landed with higher 3-D knee forces in comparison to girls at earlier stages of development.

These findings indicate that pubertal-related growth may contribute to higher rates of female adolescent knee injury.

For more information, view the abstract

American College of Sports Medicine

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Proven Strategies for Concussion Safety and Prevention

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Dr. Nik Verma  from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discusses proven strategies for safety and prevention of concussion.

nikhil vermaDr. Verma specializes in treatment of the shoulder, elbow and knee with an emphasis on advanced arthroscopic reconstructive techniques of the shoulder, shoulder replacement, knee ligament reconstruction and articular cartilage reconstruction and meniscal transplantation.

A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Dr. Verma completed his orthopedic residency at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center. He then completed a fellowship at the Hospital for Special Surgery in sports medicine and shoulder surgery. While in New York, he served as an assistant team physician for the St. John’s University Athletic Department. He also received specialized training in treatment of shoulder and elbow disorders in the overhead throwing athlete.

Currently, Dr. Verma maintains an active clinical practice performing over 500 procedures per year. He is Director of the Division of Sports Medicine and Director of the Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. In addition, he serves as a team physician for the Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls, and Nazareth Academy.

In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Verma is actively involved in orthopedic research with interests in basic science, biomechanics and clinical outcomes, and has recently received funding for his work from Major League Baseball.

He has authored multiple peer-reviewed manuscripts in major orthopedic and sports medicine journals, numerous book chapters, and routinely serves as teaching faculty for orthopedic courses on advanced surgical techniques. He frequently serves as an invited speaker or guest surgeon for national and international orthopedic sports medicine meetings.

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About NCSA – The largest and most successful athletic recruiting network

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph and Steve Kashul talk with Debbie Garr, mother of NCSA student-athlete Erin Garr about the Garr family experience working with NSCA since January 2018 to help direct Erin’s athletic future.

Headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, NCSA is now the world’s largest and most successful college athletic recruiting network. With a network of 35,000 college coaches and more than 700 employees, NCSA assists student-athletes in 34 sports find their best path to college.

Bringing Process, Technology, and Passion to Recruiting

In 2000, NCSA became the first company to challenge the status quo and bring digital technology to the antiquated, paper-based recruiting world. The innovation did not stop there. A year before the creation of YouTube, NCSA was the first to offer online highlight video access to college coaches. New technology and data also helped create a recruit match system that helps athletes determine their best college options.

One of NCSA’s strengths has always been its strong relationship with the college coach community. It’s a level of trust that has been built over time and maintained with performance. Today, there are more than 35,000 college coaches in our network. But what really drives success for NCSA and its clients is the passionate team of former college coaches and athletes who use their firsthand knowledge and expertise to help athletes at every step in the recruiting process.Home

Since 2000, more than 100,000 NCSA clients have reported their commitment to a college team.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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