Health Coaching vs Nutritionist; Helmet Safety;

Episode 17.22 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:56): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about customizing your diet to your own physiology and biology. With all the options-resources available today and information overload, Karen helps to simplify decisions on “Whats Right for Me”.

For Special Savings with Karen please visit:

14daytransformation.com and use the Coupon Code ESPN1000


Segment Two (16:03): Samantha Cochran from Athletico Physical Therapy discusses helmet safety when participating in various sports, proper use and fitting of helmets. While all leagues and teams require helmets, many coaches, players and parents don’t know exactly how to choose a helmet that will provide the right protection. Athletico has developed a step-by-step guide to educate parents, athletes and coaches on selecting and wearing helmets.

Proper Fitting Tips for Protective Equipment

  • Always follow manufacturer’s guidelines when fitting any helmet2017 national athletic training month
  • Hair should be wet when fitting any helmet
  • Each part of the helmet serves a purpose
  • Attention to detail and wearing every helmet properly ensures maximum protection
  • Never cut corners
  • Replace any helmet that has been damaged
  • Look for the NOCSAE seal of approval
  • Comfort is key
  • If your helmet is fitted properly but not comfortable, explore other options

Samantha Cochran is an athletic trainer with Athletico Physical Therapy at Malcolm X College within the City Colleges of Chicago. She received her Master of Science degree with a concentration in Kinesiology in 2014 from Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi. In her time at TAMUCC she served as a graduate assistant athletic trainer for Islanders’ athletics from 2012-2014.

Helmet Fitting Tips from Athletico Physical Therapy

Tips to Help Student Athletes Reach Peak Performance

Tips to Help Student Athletes Reach Peak PerformanceBy Athletico Physical Therapy

The Fall sport season is right around the corner! With the start of a new school year and a new sports team, the beginning of the season can be tough. Regardless of what sport is being played, there are many factors that can help student athletes have a great tryout and season, including the four tips outlined below.

ShoesProper equipment and gear at the start of the season can be a great way to prevent injuries and help athletes get an extra performance boost! Shoes are known for enduring lots of wear and tear. Worn out shoes can potentially cause foot pain and lead to overuse injuries that inhibit athletic ability. Investing in new shoes can provide athletes with more comfort, allowing them to reach peak performance. However, it is important to break in new shoes before playing in them. Doing so can help to prevent blisters and other discomfort that could occur.

Sleep: Getting a good night sleep helps athletes feel rested and ready for early morning trainings! Sleeping is essential for helping the body recover. In fact, the National Sleep Foundation notes that when sleep is cut short, the body doesn’t have enough time to complete all of the phases needed for things like muscle repair or memory consolidation. This is why it is important for athletes to gain enough shuteye before tryouts, practice and games!

Nutrition: As the season begins, the importance of nutrition should be remembered. Eating consistent healthy meals helps fuel the body and provides energy that is needed to perform. Athletes should focus on consuming enough carbohydrates from the proper sources. Good food sources include pasta, bread, cereal, fruit and vegetables. Carbohydrates are a significant contributor to an athlete’s energy, so it is important to eat the right amount. Protein can also influence performance and help the body maintain its strength. A few good sources of protein include meats, fish, beans, eggs and milk. By having a balanced diet, athletes will have the energy needed to succeed.

HydrationHydration is another aspect of nutrition that can affect performance. It is important to stay ahead of dehydration by drinking water consistently throughout the day. Athletes should always have a water bottle handy, including at practices so that enough fluids are consumed during physical activity. Since the recommendations for staying hydrated vary from person to person, consider learning more about sweat rate by reading Athletico’s “Hydration for Performance and Health.

Reaching Peak Performance

Student athletes have a lot to focus on during the school year. These tips can help athletes stay healthy and reach their peak performance for tryouts and games. Should any aches or pains during training occur, make sure to schedule a complimentary injury screen at your nearest Athletico so you can get back in the game as soon as possible.

Schedule a Complimentary Injury Screen

Bio-individual nutrition rules the day; Helmet Safety

Episode 17.03 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One: Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling discusses the benefits of Bio-individual Nutrition and a creating a food plan to fit your physiology and biology. It’s easy to get seduced by the prevalence of trendy eating options. Gluten-free, paleo, ketogenic, macrobiotic, low-glycemic, low-carb, dairy-free, vegan, fruitarian, and the list goes on and on….karen  

What makes this even more difficult is that for every physician or nutrition Ph.D. making a claim with science to back it up, there’s another researcher who can debunk it with an equally legitimate study.  

Related Post: Forget One-size fits All

Combat nutrition imbalances by including protein, fiber, colorful veggies and healthy fats in your meals and snacks. Try one of her gluten and dairy free, no added sugar, Transformation Bars. Each bar contains 11g of protein and 12g of fiber. They make a great snack, especially for people on-the-go.

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Segment Two: Samantha Cochran from Athletico Physical Therapy discusses helmet safety when participating in various sports, proper use and fitting of helmets. While all leagues and teams require helmets, many coaches, players and parents don’t know exactly how to choose a helmet that will provide the right protection. Athletico has developed a step-by-step guide to educate parents, athletes and coaches on selecting and wearing helmets.

Proper Fitting Tips for Protective Equipment

  • Always follow manufacturer’s guidelines when fitting any helmet2017 national athletic training month
  • Hair should be wet when fitting any helmet
  • Each part of the helmet serves a purpose
  • Attention to detail and wearing every helmet properly ensures maximum protection
  • Never cut corners
  • Replace any helmet that has been damaged
  • Look for the NOCSAE seal of approval
  • Comfort is key
  • If your helmet is fitted properly but not comfortable, explore other options

Samantha Cochran is an athletic trainer with Athletico Physical Therapy at Malcolm X College within the City Colleges of Chicago. She received her Master of Science degree with a concentration in Kinesiology in 2014 from Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi. In her time at TAMUCC she served as a graduate assistant athletic trainer for Islanders’ athletics from 2012-2014.

OSTEOARTHRITIS & YOUR KNEES

More than 27 million Americans have OA and the knee is one of the most commonly affected joints. There are many treatment options available including several non-pharmaceutical and non-surgical choices.

WHAT IS OA OF THE KNEE?

Osteoarthritis is commonly known as “wear-and-tear arthritis,” but did you know that young people get it, too? Osteoarthritis, or OA, is the most common type of arthritis; it happens when the body’s natural cushioning—cartilage—wears away between joints. Think of cartilage as a shock absorber for your knees; less cushion results in bone rubbing against bone, and that can cause stiffness, pain, swelling decreased mobility and bone spurs. OA typically develops slowly and becomes worse over time. There is no cure for OA, but there are many treatments available that can ease the pain and help people to retain or regain their mobility.

WHAT CAUSES OA?

The ability of cartilage to heal decreases as people age, but the causes of knee OA vary. It can be hereditary or can be the result of injury, infection, overuse or excess weight.

In osteoarthritis, the cartilage in the knee joint gradually wears away. As it does the protective spaces between the bones decrease resulting in bone rubbing on bone, producing painful bone spurs.
  • Obesity is the No. 1 driver of knee OA and the No. 1 cause of disability in the U.S.
  • Weak muscles around the knee can cause OA
  • Every extra pound of weight adds 3 to 4 pounds of extra weight to the knees; extra weight increases pressure on knees
  • Genetic mutations can make a person more likely to develop knee OA; abnormalities of bones surrounding the knee joint can also cause OA
  • Women ages 55 and older are more likely to develop knee OA
  • Athletes who play soccer, tennis or run long-distance may be at higher risk
  • Activities that cause a lot of stress on the joint—kneeling, squatting, lifting heavy weights of 55 pounds or more—can cause OA of the knee due to repetitive stress
  • Those with rheumatoid arthritis or metabolic disorders are at higher risk to develop knee OA

WHO GETS KNEE OA?

  • More than 27 million Americans have OA; the knee is one of the most commonly affected joints with more than 11 million people diagonosed in the U.S.
  • Chances of developing OA increase after age 45 and according to the Centers for Disease Control, the average onset of knee OA is 55 years old.
  • More than 40 percent of knee replacements happen over the age of 65, so many people have to find other forms of conservative, non-invasive and non-addicting methods to control pain and maintain an active lifestyle.
  • Women aged 55 and older are more likely than men to develop knee OA.

WHAT ARE MY OPTIONS IF I HAVE KNEE OA?

There are many options available for those with knee OA, including several that are non-pharmaceutical and non-surgical choices. You’ll want to talk with your health care provider about the treatment or combination of treatments that’s best for you; here are some you may want to explore and consider:

MOTION IS MEDICINE

  • Activities; walking, strength training, swimming, biking, yoga, tai chi and other low-impact activities may help with pain and function of the knee
  • Lighten up; a 2007 review found that overweight people who lost a moderate amount of weight had reduced pain and disability from knee OA
  • Braces, sleeves other devices can help reduce pain and stiffness, take weight load off the affected joint and improve confidence and function for those with knee OA
  • Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, or TENS uses electrodes to send a mild current to the affected joint, which can help alleviate pain
  • Acupuncture, balneotherapy (soaking in warm mineral springs) or heat or cold therapy may help ease joint pain for some people with knee OA
  • Medications can include acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), topical NSAIDs, prescription medications, corticosteroid or hyaluronic acid injections and more
  • Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, some studies have shown, can reduce pain and improve physical function; natural supplements, including avocado, soybean, capsaicin and turmeric, may have anti-inflammatory benefits for some people
  • Joint replacement or joint-preserving surgery may be an effective option for some people

DJO 600

HOW CAN DONJOY HELP?

If you have mild to severe knee OA and experience intermittent to chronic knee pain, or if you are not a candidate for surgery, ask your doctor about the science of bracing. DonJoy pioneered the concept of functional knee bracing more than 30 years ago and offers the most advanced technologies available.

Most importantly, they can help people return or continue to live an active lifestyle. No one person with knee OA is treated the same, so it’s important to look at all of the available solutions to find what is right for you. Some people may need a lot of off-loading capabilities, while others need just a slight push and comfort that surrounds the muscles around the knee.