TISSUE BANK EMPLOYEE BECOMES TISSUE RECIPIENT

RECIPIENT OF: PATELLA LIGAMENT ALLOGRAFT

H.C. Martensen works in the AlloSource tissue processing core where he is faced with the powerful realities and possibilities of tissue donation and transplantation every day. He also has the utmost confidence in the allografts that he and his tissue bank colleagues produce, so much so that he recently requested one for his own transplant.

Over the summer H.C. returned to his former university, Colorado College in Colorado Springs, for an alumni soccer game. He played on the team in college, and since then remained very athletic, participating in triathlons and skiing. However, at the time of the game, it had been a while since he’d played soccer. Following a cutting motion on the field he felt his leg let go below the knee. H.C. instantly knew what had occurred, not only because of his work, but also because a close friend had sustained a torn ACL just
three days prior.

Shortly thereafter a surgeon confirmed it – H.C.’s ACL and lateral meniscus were torn
and he needed surgery and an allograft transplant. Although the surgeon did not
historically use allografts from AlloSource, H.C. made a special request to have his
graft come from the tissue bank. His surgery required a patella ligament bone-tendon-bone graft, which he received from a 33-year-old male donor.


“Just a few years older than me,” H.C. said. “It added to the perspective that I’ve had.

I’m presented with the reality of the business we’re in everyday. Seeing young donors come in is hard. Now that I’ve personally benefitted I’m further grateful for the gift of donation and even more aware of what we do.”


Since his surgery in June, H.C.’s recovery has been progressing very well and he just
completed his final functional evaluation in physical therapy. Although his knee isn’t yet 100%, he knows it shouldn’t be back to normal this soon after the injury, and his road to recovery has been swifter than other patients with similar injuries. Of course, H.C. intends to make the most of his gift of life – he will be training for triathlons.

10 Reasons To Go For A Walk Right Now

On an average day, 30 percent of American adults walk for exercise and with good reason. Walking doesn’t require special equipment or athletic skills, yet it offers a host of health benefits — from helping you lose weight and lifting your mood to controlling diabetes and lowering your blood pressure. In fact, a study published in the journal PLoS Medicine showed that adding 150 minutes of brisk walking to your routine each week can add 3.4 years to your lifespan.

Here are 10 surprising ways to use walking to boost your health, along with tips to make starting and sticking to a walking routine more fun.

1. Walk to Manage Your Weight
Avoiding weight gain might be as simple as taking a walk. Researchers at Harvard University and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston followed more than 34,000 normal-weight women for more than 13 years. They found that, over time, the women who ate a standard diet and walked for an hour a day (or did some other similar moderate-activity exercise) were able to successfully maintain their weight.

Fun fitness tip: Buddy up for fitness — walk with a friend, neighbor, or a four-legged pal. A study published in the Journal of Physical Activity & Health found that dog-owners walked more each week and were more likely to reach the recommended levels of physical activity than those who do not own dogs.

2. Walk to Get Blood Pressure in Line
A heart-pumping walking routine can help lower your blood pressure, studies show. A study conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory found that moderate-intensity walking was just as effective as jogging at lowering risk of high blood pressure.

Fun fitness tip: Can’t find a full 30 minutes to walk? Spread it out throughout your day — 10 minutes here and 10 minutes there will add up if you stick with it. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, breaking your workout into several shorter workouts throughout the day is just as effective as one longer workout session, while also making it easier to fit exercise into your schedule.

3. Walk to Protect Against Dementia
Walking, which improves cerebral blood flow and lowers the risk of vascular disease, may help you stave off dementia, the cognitive loss that often comes with old age. According to the 2014 World Alzheimer’s Report, regular exercise is one of the best ways to combat the onset and advancement of the disease. In addition, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh conducted brain scans on seniors and found that walking at least six miles a week was linked to less brain shrinkage.

Fun fitness tip: Download upbeat music you love to listen to on your iPod, and take it with you while you walk. An analysis conducted by the American Council on Exercise found that music not only makes exercise more enjoyable, but it can also boost endurance and intensity.

4. Walk to Prevent Osteoarthritis
Walking is a great form of weight-bearing exercise, which helps prevent the bone-thinning condition osteoporosis, as well as osteoarthritis, the degenerative disease that causes joint pain, swelling and stiffness. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, found that people who participated in moderate aerobic activities such as walking have the healthiest knees because walking can help maintain healthy cartilage.

Fun fitness tip: Reward yourself. After you stick to your new walking routine for a few weeks, treat yourself to a new pair of shoes, a manicure, or something else that will keep you motivated.

5. Walk to Reduce Cancer Risk
Walking may reduce your chances of developing some cancers. Research published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention found that women who walked at least seven hours per week were 14 percent less likely to develop breast cancer. Similarly, a study conducted by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco and Harvard University, found that men who were treated for prostate cancer and who walked briskly at least three hours a week reduced their chances of a recurrence.

Fun fitness tip: Explore. Try a new route around the neighborhood, pick a different trail at the park, or go walking in a new location altogether to keep it interesting.

6. Walk to Prevent or Control Diabetes
Brisk walking can help prevent and manage diabetes. “A 20- to 30-minute walk can help lower blood sugar for 24 hours,” says Tami Ross, RD, LD, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Plus, The Diabetes Prevention Program, a major government study, found that even a small weight loss — for example, 10 to 15 pounds for a 200-pound person — can delay and possibly prevent the onset of the disease. Adding a brisk walk to your daily routine is one of the easiest ways to reach and maintain a healthy weight.

Fun fitness tip: Dress for the occasion. A good pair of walking shoes and comfortable clothes that are easy to move in are essential for a successful workout.

7. Walk to Lower Your Heart Disease Risk
Walking may help lower your cholesterol and, in turn, your risk for heart disease. According to the American Heart Association, walking just 30 minutes per day can lower your risk for heart disease and stroke. And since regular walking can keep cholesterol and blood pressure in check, it is a great way to boost your overall heart health.

Fun fitness tip: Challenge yourself to walk more steps every day and make fitness more fun, by using a pedometer or other fitness tracking device to chart your progress. You can set new step goals each week and even join challenges with friends and family to motivate yourself to get moving.

8. Walk to Improve Your Mood
A brisk walk can boost your mood and may even help you treat depression. A Portuguese study published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research found that depressed adults who walked for 30 to 45 minutes five times a week for 12 weeks showed marked improvements in their symptoms when medication alone did not help.

Fun fitness tip: Get outdoors! When the weather permits, take your walk outside, for a dose of vitamin D and an even bigger mood boost. Research published in the journal Ecopsychology revealed that group walks in nature were associated with significantly lower depression and perceived stress, as well as enhanced mental well-being.

9. Walk to Reduce Pain
It might seem counterintuitive, but to reduce pain from arthritis, start moving. Research shows that walking one hour per day can help reduce arthritis pain and prevent disability. The study, published in Arthritis Care & Research, determined that 6,000 steps was the threshold that predicted who would go on to develop disabilities or not. Plus, a recent study found that walking significantly improved mobility loss among patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), a condition where clogged arteries in the legs can cause pain and fatigue while walking.

Fun fitness tip: Add some healthy competition to your walk. As you move down the sidewalk or trail, imagine the people in front of you are rungs on a ladder. Then, focus on walking fast enough to overtake them one by one.

10. Walk to Reduce Stroke Risk
A large, long-term study reported in Stroke, a journal of the American Heart Association, found that women who walked at a brisk pace for exercise had a much lower chance of having a stroke than those who didn’t walk. Researchers credit this to walking’s ability to help lower high blood pressure, which is a strong risk factor for stroke.

Fun fitness tip: Join or start a regular walking club with friends or coworkers and make fun fitness plans for your outings. Recent research published in the British Journal of Sports and Medicine found that participants were enthusiastic, less tense and generally more relaxed after regular, organized walking groups.

By Beth W. Orenstein for Huffington Post

The Runner’s High

By Dev Mishra, M.D., President, Sideline Sports Doc, Clinical Assistant Professor of, Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University

Key Points:

  • When your body comes under stress or experiences pain, neurochemicals called endorphins and endocannabinoids are produced in the brain. This happens in all age groups.
  • Endorphins and endocannabinoids are considered natural painkillers because they activate receptors in the brain that help minimize discomfort
  • These brain chemicals are naturally produced as a result of exercise and are likely responsible for the feeling called “a runner’s high”

Whether you’re a young athlete or an adult, many of you have experienced a post-workout high. People love the feeling so much that “endorphin junkie” has even become synonymous with someone who’s constantly chasing that exercise high.

When your body experiences physical or even emotional stress, neurochemicals called endorphins are produced in the brain. Endorphins, which are structurally similar to the drug morphine, are considered natural painkillers because they activate receptors in the brain that help minimize discomfort. They can also help bring about feelings of euphoria and general well being.

The idea that exercise creates a huge endorphin rush entered popular culture soon after endorphins were discovered around 40 years ago. The legendary Dr. Jim Fixx started America’s running revolution back in the 1970’s, and there was thinking that endorphins could play a big role in the psychological benefits of running and exercise. But no one really knew for sure.

The problem with jumping to the conclusion that endorphins cause your “exercise high” is that in large-scale studies, scientists measure endorphins present in the blood — not the brain. Then, they make the assumption that if endorphin levels rise in the blood, then it must be because of an increase of endorphins in the brain. It’s a logical assumption but the reality is a bit more complex.

In fact, a German study found that, while endorphin levels are higher after a run, the real brain chemicals responsible for the runner’s high are called “endocannabinoids”. These substances are similar to the key chemical in marijuana. At least that’s true in running mice, who kindly volunteered for the study…

So if you aren’t an endorphin junkie, then what are you? You’re probably an endocannabinoid junkie! That just doesn’t have the same nice ring to it though, does it?

Regardless of what the actual reason is for the good feelings after exercise, the point is that you need to just get out and do something. It’s good for what ails you.

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MARATHON TRAINING

Marathon training section

Regardless of your age and ability, successful marathon training takes careful planning and preparation.

How much preparation?

Whether your goal is to run sub 3 hours or ‘just’ to finish, ideally you need to give yourself at least 18 weeks prior to the event…

And that assumes you have a solid running base to start with – currently averaging 20 plus miles per week.

But even for experienced marathon runners, allowing enough time and putting in the miles isn’t enough. Unless you follow some key principles of training there’s a good chance you’ll hit that wall – or at the very least log a time that doesn’t inspire you.

Below you’ll find several half-marathon and full marathon training schedules – classed as beginner, intermediate and advanced…

If you’re a complete novice (i.e. with little or no recent running experience), ideally you need allow a good 6 months to slowly build up your mileage.

The Intermediate and Advanced programs are shorter but assume you have a solid running base to begin with.

Additional articles will cover other important issues – choosing the right running shoes, re-hydration and nutrition and so on. These are as applicable to the 2:30 runner as they are to the first-timer.

By J Anderson for SportsFitnessAvisor

More on Marathon Training Plans & Articles

Sport Fitness Advisor

TISSUE RECIPIENT COMPETES IN IRONMAN TRIATHLON

Rachel was a typical college athlete: focused, intense, and determined. When a knee injury threatened her ability to complete in her final soccer season, she simply played through the pain.

It wasn’t long before Rachel discovered she could no longer “grin and bear” her meniscus injury. She had to have the injured tissue replaced with an allograft – sidelining her for months from any physical activity.


“It was a difficult decision,” recalls Rachel. “But movement is everything to me. I knew I had to have the procedure.”


Today, Rachel went back to competition. In fact, she completed the Hawaii Ironman 70.3 Triathlon in May 2009, something she only dreamed of prior to her allograft meniscus replacement.

Inspired by her experience, Rachel chose orthopedics as her field of specialty in medical school as an MD candidate at Rush University Medical Center.