Selection of Athletic Performance Training Shoe and Training NBA Players

In this segment Dr. Brian Cole of Midwest Orthopedics at Rush & Steve Kashul talk with Dalton Walker, Team Leader at Road Runner Sports of Chicago, about the science of determining the proper  athletic-performance shoe. Dalton explains how several factors including sport, gait and previous injury information will help determine the best fit and best outcome for the perfect shoe.

Also in this segment, Alex Perris, General Manager of RiverNorthCrossfit discusses his techniques as personal trainer and personal experiences training NBA players. Born and raised in New York City, Alex moved to Chicago in 2008 to become full time personal trainer to former Chicago Bulls star Joakim Noah.

He still works with NBA players and other Pro Basketball players. Alex served active duty in the United States Air Force and specializes in general strength and conditioning training and holds CrossFit Level 1 and Level 2 certification. He is available for 1 on 1 training.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

Share this:

Risk Factors For Adolescent Stress Fractures

By Dev Mishra, M.D., President, Sideline Sports Doc, Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University

Key Points:

  • A recent scientific found several characteristics associated with stress fracture risk: lower than normal body mass index, four weeks or more history of shin splints, minimal involvement in weight training, decreased amount of sleep, daily stress, and low dairy intake.
  • Further study is needed to prove cause and effect, but it’s reasonable to recommend strategies such as inclusion of resistance training, reducing monthly training load, and optimizing nutrition to reduce stress fracture risk

A stress fracture is an overuse injury that occurs when muscles become fatigued and eventually are unable to absorb the shock from a sport or fitness activity. Rather than being absorbed by the muscle, the stresses are instead transferred to the bone causing an injury to the bone itself. The bone injury is called a stress fracture.

Stress fractures in adolescent athletes are unfortunately fairly common. Here’s an interesting recently published scientific study that aims to identify risk factors for stress fractures in adolescent athletes. The authors found several characteristics associated with stress fracture risk: lower than normal body mass index, four weeks or more history of shin splints, minimal involvement in weight training, decreased amount of sleep, daily stress, and low dairy intake.

Data was collected from the National High School Stress Fracture Registry (NHSSFR), an internet-based adolescent stress fracture database. These findings were compared with a survey of 100 healthy athletic controls to identify significant differences between healthy adolescents and those with bone stress injury. Due to the design of the study, it did not identify cause and effect but instead sought to find an association between certain characteristics and stress fractures.

Taken as a whole these are interesting findings and there are a few messages that we can take away from the data.

First, a lower than normal body mass index may be a sign of reduced energy availability, similar to what takes place in the female athlete triad. While there are plenty of athletes with lower than normal body mass index who will never develop a stress fracture it is still reasonable and plausible to make an association between low body max index and less than optimal nutritional health.

Inclusion of resistance training exercises in any athlete’s training regimen should be beneficial. Resistance training improves muscle strength, power, and tendon resiliency, all of which will help to reduce stress on the bone.

Lower than normal dairy intake may have an effect on calcium intake, vitamin D metabolism, and also have a negative effect on bone health. This would also contribute to stress fracture risk.

I’m not sure what to make of the association with increased daily stress and reduced amounts of sleep. Connecting the dots between those aspects of health and development of a bone stress injury would be speculative.

This study aims to find factors associated with bone stress injury in adolescents and is commendable for being one of the first studies to do so. Further research is needed to prove cause and effect.

We come back to many of the principles that I’ve written about previously: young athletes should participate in multiple sports and cross train to the extent possible. Try to limit single sport participation to eight months or less out of the year. Do resistance training exercises, and optimize nutritional intake.

Related Content:

Categories: NutritionOveruseRunningSports Science
Concepts: 

Share this:

Unconventional Meditation | A Mindful Experience

I am an avid hiker. I don’t travel long distances to hike, the Sandia Mountains are located on the east side of Albuquerque and I can enjoy myriad trails year round.  I know, many places don’t have mountains to hike it, but this isn’t about hiking per se, more about noticing your surroundings while getting a great all over workout.  It’s about learning to focus on your surroundings, breathe deeply and learning to live in the moment, meditating without sitting.

It’s about learning to focus on your surroundings, breathe deeply and learning to live in the moment, meditating without sitting.

Walking out the front door is easy.  Put on a pair of shoes and go!  I will attempt to talk about how to meditate while working out.  As you start to walk notice your surroundings, each yard is different, people are walking their dogs, different cars go by, the ever changing cloud patterns…  Walk at different speeds, find hills, include a jog once in awhile.  Take time to think about what your body is doing.  Focus on your breath.  Try slow deep breaths through the nose, try faster deeper breaths, not too fast, through your mouth.  As you settle into a pattern and focus on your breath your walk becomes meditative.  Breathe in, breathe out…  In time you become aware of every step, every breath, every blade of grass, every tree, every cloud.

Even a cardio workout at the gym can be meditative.  You step onto the elliptical trainer, set your time, resistance and incline, and you start to move.  Right, left, right, left, breathe deep, find a cadence.  If you listen to music you can keep time with the beat.  Try breathing in time with your feet, every right and left is one breath, or slow it down to every two or three revolutions.  Follow the cadence of someone next to you while you look out the window and admire the clouds.  The focus is on the breath.

As I hike I try to stay in the moment.  I listen to each breath, hear each footstep as it lands on the ground and notice each twig I break as I look at the vegetation that has changed from green and lush to sparse and dry in the winter months, and back to green in the spring and summer  I can hike the same trail ten times in three months and see something different each time.  The world is amazing – pay attention to everything!

I teach my students and clients to be mindful and present.  We work on breath, focus and mindfulness.  Of course we work on strength, cardio, nutrition and general fitness too but our lifeline is our breath, we need to focus to be present and enjoy our life, and mindfulness is just plain good karma.  It can take a lifetime to learn to master, but with daily practice we can achieve the things we want and enjoy every moment.  Learning to meditate teaches us patience and calmness.  This patience and calmness can help us in many aspects of our life.

You don’t need mountains to walk.  Head out the front door and breathe in the day.

Author: Mindy Caplan ACSM-EP is a New Mexico-based Fitness Instructor, Personal Trainer, Wellness/Lifestyle Coach, and Yoga Instructor.

Share this:

Ask the Doctor!

This regular segment of ‘Ask the Doctor’ addresses questions submitted by Sports Medicine Weekly followers. Dr. Brian Cole from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush will be discussing:

  • Runners Knee.
  • Exercise after Knee Replacement.
  • Physical Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis .

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

If you have a question to be addressed on an upcoming show, please click here to submit your question.

Share this: