For Hockey Players, Downtime Means Lacrosse Training Time

Dr. Brian Cole, @SteveKashul & Jason DeMaria owner of JD Strength Performance discuss training routine w/ hockey players during the off season and the growing popularity of #lacrosse training techniques.

Jason (Jay) De Maria attended Western Michigan University. While in college, Jay played ice hockey and volleyball.  As a student, he earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in the field of Exercise Science. Quickly looking to further his education, Jason became a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist from the National Strength and Conditioning Association and a Performance Enhancement Specialist through the National Academy of Sports Medicine.

With more than 10 years of experience behind him, Jason has successfully coached athletes in multiple sports.  Athletes of all levels have succeeded under Jason’s coaching, ranging from youth athletes all the way through the Collegiate and Professional ranks.  His dedication has earned him time working alongside strength and conditioning staffs in the USHL and the NHL.

More on Notable Athletes trained by Jason DeMaria

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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Ice Hockey Injury Awareness and Prevention

By Brian Rog and Katie Christopherson, ATC for ATI Physical Therapy

Ice Hockey Injury Awareness and Prevention from ATI Physical Therapy

Behind any sport’s glory lies a complex algorithm so delicate that even the slightest miscalculation in training or performance can cut a practice, game or season short. High-intensity, year-long sports like ice hockey, adhere to a very complex set of rules due to the on-ice demands and endless fitness requisites. In keeping up with these standards, as a player, coach or parent, it’s important to be educated on gear safety, strength & conditioning, skating technique and return to play rehab protocols.

With the help of ATI Physical Therapy athletic trainer and seasoned hockey player, Katie Christopherson, we’ll take an inside look into common hockey injuries, injury prevention tips and stretching recommendations to help you relish the game and all its glory. Adding to this, our friends at ProStockHockey supplied us with an insightful upper body injury infographic , which underscores the importance of choosing the right equipment.

What are the more common hockey injuries treated in the clinics?

When it comes to hockey injuries, regardless of age and skill level, we commonly see injuries to the head, shoulders, hips, knees, feet, and ankles. Injuries linked to the body parts mentioned above can be assessed and rehabbed in a physical therapy clinic. Head injuries are an exception to this as most rehab clinics are not staffed with head injury specialists. However, at select ATI locations, we have specialists credentialed to treat head injuries and their accompanying hindrances.

Within the sport, hockey injuries are traditionally classified as either chronic (overuse) or acute (more traumatic). So when you hear of a player suffering ‘an acute concussion’, you’ll know the level of injury the athlete is dealing with. Looking deeper into these common hockey injuries, here’s a breakdown of the top-4 and their contributors:

Shoulder injuries

It is common to find rotator cuff and glenohumeral (ball and socket joint) injuries being treated in clinics.  The rotator cuff is a group of stabilizing muscles that are frequently used with stick handling in hockey.  Shoulder dislocations and AC joint sprains are common due to checking in hockey as well and require physical therapy to correct.

Hip injuries

In the hip, you will find a lot of groin muscle strains due to a misstep in skating or getting caught up in the boards or another person’s leg or stick.

Knee injuries

In the knee, our clinics more commonly see MCL sprains and/or meniscus tears, which result from twisting of the knee or direct impact to the outer side of the knee.

Head injuries

Given the full-contact nature of hockey, it’s no surprise we see a steady stream of head injuries such as concussions. Head injuries can have very serious consequences and require immediate medical attention, so don’t ignore the warning signs.

How can a hockey player lessen the risk of injury? 

To help lessen the risk of injury, a player must undergo proper training, wear sized-appropriate protective gear, and follow proper rehab protocols when returning from an injury.  Before tackling this checklist, it’s important to know that roles will vary according to a player’s position on the ice, whether it be a forward, defensemen or goalie.  These roles vary by position, so following position-designated strengthening, skating technique, gear, and return-to-play rehab protocols will help you better adapt to role-specific scenarios.

For instance, if you are a forward, the position does not demand as much backwards skating as a defensive position, however both positions utilize forward-skating crossover techniques, so in some cases you’ll borrow tactics from other positions.

Irrespective of position assignment, it’s strongly suggested that as players move through the ranks they should work towards a versatile role, meaning they can assume the duties of a defenseman (or forward), if needed. Doing this helps a player better adapt to varying on-ice challenges, both physically and mentally. The anomaly to this versatility rule is, of course, the goalie, since this position will never assume the role of a d-man or forward. On the flip side, you won’t see a skater step into the crease, unless of course you are Kris Russel of the Edmonton Oilers who holds the record for most blocked shots in one game at 15.

Since we are talking goalies, which is by far the most unique and laborious position on the ice, let’s take a look at what we know and have seen as far as injuries and conditioning strategy. Given the dynamic duties of a goaltender, we most commonly treat hip injuries resulting from squatting positions, quick side-to-side transitions and knee-to-ice movements that necessitate major hip rotations.

Similar to a forward or defenseman, a goalie must also understand the mechanics of the position and the levels of mobility needed to meet the grueling demands of the position. What makes this position even more unique is that on top of recognizing one’s own mechanics and strategies, a netminder must also learn the mechanics and strategies of a skater to better prepare their physical responses.

Once you’ve identified your role on the ice and importance of training and rehabilitation guidelines for each position, it comes time to establish a more thorough, role-specific training and injury-prevention program. For a forward or defenseman, this program must combine a focus on strength, speed, flexibility and endurance. With a goalie, their program should be similar to their teammates, however, he/she must follow a program that has an increased focus on flexibility, strength and endurance.

Avoiding injuries with the proper gear

The main thing to remember when outfitting yourself (or someone else), is to make sure the gear is appropriate for the position (i.e., skater vs. goalie) and that it fits properly. With this, you must also consider proper stick lengths and shape as well as the way a hockey skate fits and the skate’s blade radius. And yes, even the sharpness of the hockey skate blade can affect the player due to on-ice variables such as one’s position and softness/hardness of the ice.  Making yourself and others aware of these things and taking appropriate action can help to lessen the severity and occurrence of on-ice injuries. For helpful tips on properly outfitting your equipment, check out this hockey equipment fitting guide from the experts at Dick’s Sporting Goods.

Corrective stretches that can help to minimize injury risk 

Research has proven that including dynamic (mobility stretches) and static (stationary stretches) stretches will not only improve your endurance and balance, but will also lessen the risk of injury. While the aforementioned benefits are well known across the athletic community, the timing of the stretches (warm up/post-game) are commonly up for debate. ATI’s physical therapy experts suggest focusing on dynamic stretches before hitting the ice and static once finished, which include:

Dynamic stretches before hitting the ice

Dynamic hockey warm-ups, which are great for getting the heart rate up and enhancing range of motion and power, can be done on land (without gear) or can be done once you hit the ice.  Some beneficial flat-land warm ups include exercises such as high knees, hip swings, arm swings, butt kicks, karaoke, side steps and ankle hops. For dynamic on-ice exercises, consider hip circles, arm circles, leg swings, Cossack squats and trunk rotators.  The warm-up should take around 15 to 20 minutes all together and does not need to include static stretches as this will not help elevate your heart rate, which is an essential ingredient to priming the muscles for activity.

Static stretches after a game or practice 

Hockey players of all levels incorporate some form of static stretching after a game or practice without gear. The post-activity stretch is key in preventing injuries as it helps with maintaining flexibility and lowering recovery time. Examples of static stretches include, reaching for toes (hamstring), butterfly (groin), hollywood or secretary stretch (low back), flamingo (quads), lunge stretch (hip flexors), piriformis (hip/glutes), and IT band stretch (side of leg/hip).  These are all important in supporting flexibility and helping stay injury-free.

Preventing an overuse injury

There are multiple steps a skater can take to help prevent an overuse injury.  First off, as is the case in all sports, proper training is the cornerstone for achieving peak performance and fitness levels. In doing this, avoid going from minimal levels of activity to a high level as your chances of injury or muscle strain are significantly increased.

When training, also pay close attention to your form when doing cross-overs, skating backwards, and working on shooting technique. Over time, improper form places unnecessary loads on the muscles, causing them to break down. As a result, recovery times become lengthy and rehab programs exhausting.

This brings us to our last point on the role warm-ups and post-activity stretching play in shielding your muscles from injury. Including some form of dynamic warm-up before activity as well as static stretches afterward can be very beneficial for muscle sustainability, wellness and recovery. It’s been stated that well-structured warm-ups and stretches will get your heart rate and muscles ready to handle a heavy load while post-activity stretching allows your heart rate to decrease, causing your body to idle down into a resting state.

Managing hockey injuries, aches and pains

ATI experts strongly encourage athletes to take care of any minor aches and pains before they compound and get worse.  This can be as simple as heating for 20 minutes before activity and icing for 20 minutes after activity when the athlete feels soreness in one particular area.  If the pain persists, it might be a good idea to call your physician or visit your nearest ATI physical therapy clinic. In fact, at ATI, we offer complimentary injury screenings, so stop in and see what we can do for you.

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Competitive Ice Hockey Player Kicks Foot Injury

From Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush University Medical Center

Last year, Holly Barocio, 34 of Chicago, skated with gusto onto the ice, ready to defendHolly2.jpg her co-ed hockey team’s championship title. She never thought that rather than skating away with a trophy in hand, she would be carried off the ice by an ambulance.

Holly remembers the moment she was injured vividly. “Every part of me went left except for my foot. My blade got caught in a groove in the ice and I immediately felt acute pain. After that, I think I was in a state of shock trying to understand what happened.”To make matters worse, her team lost by a two point margin. She says it didn’t help that her teammate and husband, Jason, also left the game when he accompanied her to the hospital. “My husband and I have this brain synergy. We always know where the other is on the ice without even looking.”

At the emergency room, Holly was told she had a clean break and likely wouldn’t need surgery. However, she was not confident in this assessment and sought a second opinion.

“Without a doubt Rush kept coming up, specifically Dr. Kamran Hamid’s name,” she explains. “I liked him right out of the gate; he had great bedside manner and a level of attention and care that I found unique.”


“I liked him right out of the gate; he had great bedside manner and a level of attention and care that I found unique.”


Dr. Hamid took thoughtful measures to consider how Holly’s treatment would affect her commitment to return to hockey. He performed a “Stability Test” to definitively determine whether she needed surgery or not. The results confirmed that her ankle was unstable and would benefit from a surgery.

Pond 2.JPG

Dr. Hamid used a special low-profile metal plate that he felt would best accommodate Holly’s ability to skate. This plate lies closer to the bone to have less irritation with a skate while still providing excellent stability.

Holly’s recovery revolved around her passion for hockey. “I was direct with Dr. Hamid and told him, this is not a deterrent for me. I will return to hockey.” In fact, she was determined to help her team qualify for playoffs. “I am going to play hockey again no matter what. That is how much I enjoy the sport,” she remembers telling Dr. Hamid. “I have a hard time seeing myself as a non-hockey player.”

Now, equipped with her newly repaired ankle, Holly has officially returned to her second home on the ice and reports, “I have been smiling non-stop! No pain, no discomfort.”

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Health Coaching vs Nutritionist; Helmet Safety

Episode 17.22 

Segment One (01:56): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about customizing your diet to your own physiology and biology. With all the options-resources available today and information overload, Karen helps to simplify decisions on “Whats Right for Me”.

For Special Savings with Karen please visit:

14daytransformation.com and use the Coupon Code ESPN1000


Segment Two (16:03): Samantha Cochran from Athletico Physical Therapy discusses helmet safety when participating in various sports, proper use and fitting of helmets. While all leagues and teams require helmets, many coaches, players and parents don’t know exactly how to choose a helmet that will provide the right protection. Athletico has developed a step-by-step guide to educate parents, athletes and coaches on selecting and wearing helmets.

Proper Fitting Tips for Protective Equipment

  • Always follow manufacturer’s guidelines when fitting any helmet2017 national athletic training month
  • Hair should be wet when fitting any helmet
  • Each part of the helmet serves a purpose
  • Attention to detail and wearing every helmet properly ensures maximum protection
  • Never cut corners
  • Replace any helmet that has been damaged
  • Look for the NOCSAE seal of approval
  • Comfort is key
  • If your helmet is fitted properly but not comfortable, explore other options

Samantha Cochran is an athletic trainer with Athletico Physical Therapy at Malcolm X College within the City Colleges of Chicago. She received her Master of Science degree with a concentration in Kinesiology in 2014 from Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi. In her time at TAMUCC she served as a graduate assistant athletic trainer for Islanders’ athletics from 2012-2014.

Helmet Fitting Tips from Athletico Physical Therapy

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