After 8 Failed Surgeries, Athlete’s Foot Gets Proper Care by Dr. Lin

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Kelsie Hannigan, 17, was a typical high school student at Lincoln Way Central. She loved going shopping, hanging out with friends, and has been devoted to tumbling, gymnastics, and cheerleading since she was three years old.

While tumbling in cheer one day, Kelsie was practicing a full – a very impressive backflip with a twist – and abruptly landed on her left foot. She knew this was different from other times.

She sought advice from two or three doctors, all of whom told her to wait and see if it would heal on its own. Unfortunately, it didn’t.

One doctor diagnosed the damage as a Linsfrac fracture and agreed to perform surgery. About two weeks post-operation, however, she was still feeling severe pain in her foot and new pain in her ankle. Kelsie ended up being on and off crutches and in and out of the hospital for a year, unable to return to cheerleading, tumbling, or any physical activity. She underwent more surgeries to insert anchors, remove anchors, and repair bones.

One year and eight surgeries later, Kelsie had seen no improvement in her pain and didn’t know what to do. At this point, she had more injuries than she had started with, including recurrent popping in the lateral aspect of her ankle and chronic dislocation of her peroneal tendon.

Finally, six months after her last surgery, she discovered Dr. Johnny Lin at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush. She was initially cautious about surgery, but refreshingly hopeful about this new surgeon.

“Dr. Lin told me everything he was going to do,” she explains. “I wasn’t scared about what was going to happen. He told me all the risks and reassured me that it would be okay.”

Earlier this year, Dr. Lin performed a left ankle fibular exostectomy, hardware removal, calcaneal hardware removal, peroneal tenolysis and debridement, peroneal groove deepening, and superior peroneal retinacularplication to repair Kelsie’s foot and ankle.

Kelsie was impressed at how capable Dr. Lin was and how quickly her recovery progressed – this experience was much different than her past surgeries. She spent six weeks on crutches and two more in a boot.

“It was amazing having just one surgery,” she says. “Before, we never knew if it would be the last one. This time, even right afterward, we knew.”

Kelsie continued with six weeks of physical therapy to get stronger and to rebuild the physical stability in her foot and ankle. She has gone running a couple times but is still cautious when it comes to cheer and tumbling.

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Instead, she spends more time coaching gymnastics and tumbling for kids up to 11 years old. She has a blast teaching and is happy that she can be more involved in the physical requirements of her job.

Kelsie is relieved to be in less pain and looking forward to returning to her very active life. She is finally able to enjoy doing everyday things, such as going shopping or going out to eat with friends, that she missed out on because of severe foot and ankle pain. Less than two months post-operation, she even made it out of the boot for her mother’s wedding.

She is grateful to be progressing in recovery and returning to her life.

“Dr. Lin knew what he was talking about and knew he could make it better. He went in and fixed everything.”

Donor Family Shares Story of Hope; Zach Miller Knee Injury; Cheerleader Injuries

Episode 17.30 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:30): The Healing Process of Donor Parents Lori and Rob Chana.

Cameron Chana (2)Cameron Chana was a born leader who focused on making an impact in lives of others. He was very involved in volunteer work, his church, and went on mission trips across the world. No matter where he was, he encouraged positivity and spread his caring, upbeat energy.

The Chana family’s world was turned upside down when twenty-two-year old Cameron was killed in a bus accident in 2009. During a time of unimaginable grief, his parents and three siblings honored his wish to be a donor.

Cameron’s legacy of hope and love lives on through the gift of organ and tissue donation. He saved five lives through organ donation and impacted as many as 50 lives through tissue donation. Learn more at AllowSource.

Lori & Rob Chana with Steve and Dr. Cole

Chana family with Cameron on the Left

Cameron’s heart recipient


Segment Two (14.12): Steve and Dr. Cole talk with former Chicago Bear Otis WilsonUSP NFL: CHICAGO BEARS AT NEW ORLEANS SAINTS S FBN NO CHI USA LA about Zach Millers horrific knee injury in the recent game against the New Orleans Saints. Chicago Bears Zach Miller had emergency surgery last week to repair a torn popliteal artery in his left leg, an injury that has resulted in amputation in some previous instances involving other football players. The 33-year-old dislocated his left knee while trying to catch a touchdown pass, which subsequently damaged the artery.


Segment Three (21:04): Dr. Kathy Weber from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about the prevalence of catastrophic injuries and concussions in cheerleaders. Cheerleading is by far the most perilous sport for female athletes in high school and college, accounting for as much as two-thirds of severe school-sports injuries over the past 25 years, according to a new report. Yet cheerleading remains one of the least-regulated sports, despite more than 95,000 high school girls and 2,000 boys signing up for spirit squads nationwide each year.


kathleen weberDr. Weber’s reputation as a leading sports medicine physician is enhanced by her remarkable activity in the treatment of high-level professional athletes. She serves as the head primary care sports medicine team physician for the Chicago Bulls and the Chicago White Sox and the head team physician for the Chicago Force Women’s Football. She also serves as co-head team physician for the DePaul Blue Demons and the physician for the Hubbard Street Dance and the River North Dance Companies. In addition, she is a member of the LPGA Medical Advisory Board. She is on numerous committees including the NBA Team Physicians Executive Committee, NBA Research Committee, MLB Concussion Committee, and MLB Research Committee. Dr. Weber has been involved with the MLB Medical Advisory Board for multiple years and is the first women elected President of the MLB Team Physicians Association.

Stem Cells in the Future of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine; Gymnastics at Rio

Episode 16.22 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Dr. James Andrews, Orthopaedic surgeon and founding partner for the James R. Andrews, M.D. - Orthopaedic SurgeryAndrews Institute for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, discusses the role of stem cells in the future of orthopaedics and sports medicine. Stem cells are immature, undeveloped cells that have the potential to generate other cells that may form different types of tissue. At the Andrews Institute, doctors and surgeons are studying stem cells in order to bring the best treatments to patients in a manner that is safe, effective and ethically responsible.

The potential for stem cells in regenerative medicine has piqued the interest of many athletes who have sustained injuries, such as torn ligaments and tendons. Adult stem cells may be especially promising if they are harvested from an athlete’s own bone marrow and fat cells. The staff of the Andrews Institute strives to advance regenerative medicine in cooperation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“There’s no reason in the world for our elite athletes to have to go offshore somewhere else to get the best treatment to enhance biologic healing,” James Andrews, M.D., told ESPN.

Related: LiveActive with Rush – Advancing Joint Restoration Research; Stem Cells may be the Future of Orthopaedics


Segment Two: Gina Pongetti-Angeletti-PT, MPT, MA, CSCS, ART-Cert. from Achieve Orthopedic Rehab Institute. Gina is Co- Owner, Sports Medicine Division and covered the Rio Olympics for Inside Gymnastics magazine and provided physical therapy services for the competing gymnastic athletes. Gina shares her experience at the Rio Olympics and explains how the athletes need to train for achievement at the highest level.

A former gymnast of 14 years, and an accomplished triathlete herself: Gina raced in the Ironman World Championships in Kona, HI in October of 2006. She treats on site at Ironman events nationwide and is the provider of choice for many of the nation’s and worlds top Ironman triathletes.

Gina received her Bachelor’s in Communication Studies and Masters in Physical Therapy from Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI, where she served for more than 8 years on the USA Gymnastics National Health Care Referral Network; providing medical care at meets and lecturing. Currently, Gina takes care of many of our nation’s top gymnasts, including local Elites, National Team members, World Team competitors, NCAA Champions, Olympians, and Pan American Champions.