Hip Dysplasia  in Young Female Athletes; The NBA Combine; Why we were Skinnier in the 80’s

Episode 17.12 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:20): Dr. Joel Williams from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush describes Hip Dysplasia, symptoms, treatment alternatives and who might be more prone to Image result for hip dysplasiahaving the condition.

Hip dysplasia, a condition where the hip socket doesn’t fully cover the ball portion of the femur, resulting in instability, is rising in young active women, who have probably had it since birth. Recent research shows that receiving care early is vital to a successful treatment experience for hip dysplasia patients.  Doing so may help patients delay or avoid having a total hip replacement (arthroplasty).

Dr. Joel C. Williams brings seven years of training and passion for complex fracture care, post-traumatic deformity, pelvis and acetabular surgery, and complex hip surgery to Rush University Medical Center.

Dr. Williams is a native of Michigan and graduated from the Michigan State University Honors Program. He then attended medical school at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. There, he was awarded a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship and spent a year doing basic science research.

Dr. Williams’ surgical training began at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, where he completed his residency in orthopedic surgery. While a resident, he did a research fellowship and was awarded a grant from the Orthopaedic Trauma Association to investigate fracture healing. Additionally, he was awarded a traveling fellowship from the AO Trauma Foundation to study orthopedic traumatology in Chur, Switzerland with Dr. Cristoph Sommer. More…

Learn more about hip disorders at Hips for Life and download the Prevention Techniques Brochure

Hips for Life


Segment Two (12:26): Dr. Cole as head team physician for the Chicago Bulls discusses the various challenges related to the NBA Draft Combine and how they are dealt with in what is described as a complicated and chaotic process.

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Segment Three (17:09): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks about why it’s harder for adults today to maintain the same weight as those 20 to 30 years ago did, even at the same levels of food intake and exercise; how to maintain a healthy microbiome/weight and how we can avoid the obesity epidemic.

  • People are exposed to more chemicals that might be weight-gain inducing. Pesticides, flame retardants, and the substances in food packaging might all be altering our hormonal processes and tweaking the way our bodies put on and maintain weight.
  • The use of prescription drugs has risen dramatically since the ‘70s and ‘80s. Prozac, the first blockbuster SSRI, came out in 1988. Antidepressants are now one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S., and many of them have been linked to weight gain.
  • The microbiomes of Americans might have somehow changed between the 1980s and now. It’s well known that some types of gut bacteria make a person more prone to weight gain and obesity.
Karen Malkin is certified as an Integrative Health Coach and Lifestyle Practitioner and a Certified Eating Psychology Coach. Karen has a private practice in Glencoe, Illinois.  She passionately serves on the Board of Directors for the Environmental Working Group, the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Spiral Sun Ventures and Gardeneer.

JAMMED FINGER- SEE A DOCTOR OR NOT?

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D., President, Sideline Sports Doc, Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University

Key Points:

  • A jammed finger occurs with direct impact to the tip of a finger and is generally a mild sprain that resolves in a few days
  • Some finger injuries can be more serious and require urgent evaluation. Examples would include complete tendon tears, joint dislocation, or broken bone.
  • Use The SAFE Method™ (Story, Appearance, Feel, Effort) to rapidly evaluate an injured finger

Catching or getting hit by a ball on the tip of a finger- a football, volleyball, or basketball- is generalyouthbasketball a common way kids and young adults can injure a finger. Fortunately, most finger injuries are reasonably mild and will allow for a quick return to sport. A “jammed finger” is a sprain of the soft tissue structures surrounding a joint. But sometimes a tendon (a structure that links muscle to bone, and cause fingers to move) can be torn, or a joint can be dislocated, or one of the bones broken.

There are some simple steps you can take to rapidly evaluate an injury and make a reasonable determination about whether it’s safe to continue play, or perhaps whether you should seek urgent physician evaluation. At Sideline Sports Doc, we use a simple evaluation for sports injuries that we call The SAFE Method™. The SAFE Method™ is an acronym for Story, Appearance, Feel, and Effort. You use these four points to evaluate pretty much any sports injury. Here’s how you use it for a jammed finger.

Story

Basically this means “how did it get hurt”. Most of the time there will be direct contact to the tip of the finger, that’s pretty obvious. But here you want to be on the lookout for things such as very severe pain, whether you may have heard a pop, or whether you may have felt something crack. Those are all “red flags” indicating that you might have a significant injury. If you have any of those red flags I’d recommend evaluation in an urgent care facility. And if you don’t have any red flags, move on to…

Appearance

What does it look like? In most typical jammed fingers your finger should look pretty normal in the first several minutes after the injury, this is common with a simple jammed finger. (It may get swollen an hour or two later…) But what if it is rapidly becoming swollen, or if it’s bent at an unusual angle, or if the joint is obviously out of position? If any of those things are what you’re seeing then go to an emergency room for proper treatment. Does it look normal? That’s good, so move on next to Feel.

Feel

In “feel” you want to press lightly on the injured joint. Generally this will produce mild soreness with a common jammed finger. But if your light touch feels really painful that’s a red flag indicating the need for urgent evaluation. Significant pain with light touch is often present with broken bones. Are you still doing ok? Then move on to the last evaluation step, Effort.

Effort

In this last step you want to make an effort at moving the injured area on your own. For hand injuries this is done by making a fist and opening the fingers out straight. If you’re able to do this fairly easily, that’s good and generally goes along with a jammed finger. But what if you can’t make a fist, can’t open the fingers, or if the joint just won’t move? That could mean a torn tendon, or possibly another significant injury. Get yourself to an urgent care facility.

So if you pass each of the four steps without any red flags or areas of concern youSideLineSportsDoc probably have a sprain or a jammed finger. Get home and apply RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation) and monitor your progress each day. But if things don’t start turning back to normal in the next few days, or if you have concerns that it isn’t healing as you’d expect then it’s always safe to seek proper physician evaluation.

INJURY PREVENTION WARMUP PROGRAMS WORK- USE ONE!

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D., President, Sideline Sports Doc, Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University

Key Points:

  • Warmup based injury prevention programs such as the FIFA 11+ and others show a dramatic reduction in injury rates for young athletes
  • The results are so impressive that I believe all youth sport organizations should recommend one of these warmup based injury prevention programs for their young athletes

I’m a big believer in using warmup based training programs as part of the overall effort to soccer training closeupreduce the numbers of injuries in athletes. I’ve previously written about the FIFA 11+ and we include videos with support from Dr. Bert Mandelbaum in our Sideline Sports Doc injury recognition course for coaches. The early evidence about the FIFA 11+ showed dramatic reductions in many types of lower extremity injuries in soccer with no downside.

Over time additional positive evidence has surfaced. In Europe, the FIFA 11+ has been used in sports outside soccer such as basketball, and some new training methods have also been developed. A study published in September 2016 in the American Journal of Sports Medicine came to one solid conclusion: these training methods are effective in reducing injury rates for adolescent athletes in a variety of sports, and teams would be wise to implement one of these.

The study is a “meta analysis”, where results from several studies are pooled and statistically analyzed for quality and strength of the evidence. Ten independently produced studies were analyzed. The pooled results demonstrated a significant injury rate reduction with the use of injury prevention programs versus control interventions overall. Interestingly, basketball/handball experienced a greater injury rate reduction with injury prevention programs than in soccer. Non-FIFA11+ programs experienced a larger injury reduction rate than FIFA11+ programs. But results for all the programs were impressive.

Here are some of the key findings:

  • Five of the included studies used the FIFA11+ injury prevention program, while the remaining five studies investigated generic programs with warm-up, stretching, strengthening, and balance board exercises.
  • Injury prevention programs were associated with a statistically significant 40% reduction in injury rate over a total of 756,461 training and match exposure hours when compared to control groups
  • Handball/basketball experienced a 51% reduction in injury rate with injury prevention programs versus control while a 30% reduction was observed in soccer
  • Non-FIFA11+ programs were associated with a 48% reduction in injury rate compared to control while FIFA11+ programs demonstrated a 32% reduction in injury rate

The results of this study suggest that the consistent use of injury prevention programs can help to reduce the risk of injury in adolescents competing in team sports. Further research is necessary to dig deeper into the possible differences of the training programs by sport, but overall I would have to say that all of the programs showed large reductions in injury rates. The improvements are so large with essentially no downside that I think every youth sport organization should be recommending one of these for their members.

Search your local sport organization or children’s hospital for programs you can use; there are quite a few in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. If you live in the New York City area I like the Hospital For Special Surgery’s Sports Safety Program, and the downloadable FIFA 11+ can be found here.

Bottom line: injury prevention programs are effective in reducing injury rates for adolescent athletes. Find one and use one.

Off-season Program for The Chicago Bulls; Steam vs Sauna; Overuse Hand Injuries from use of Cellphones

Episode 17.11 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.new host image


Segment One (01:38): Jeff Tenaka, Head Athletic Trainer for the Chicago Bulls discusses off season team activities: recovery, player assessment, treating injuries, conditioning; testing and evaluating prospective new players and collaborating with other trainers.

Tanaka, 37, brings more than 15 years of experience on the professional and collegiateJeff Tanaka levels to the Bulls. He spent ten seasons as an Assistant Athletic Trainer with the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League and spent the previous two seasons at the University of California-Berkeley in the same capacity. Prior to his tenure at Cal Berkeley, Tanaka had four stints in the professional ranks, beginning with a training camp internship with the Los Angeles Raiders in 1994.

He then spent two seasons as a graduate assistant with the 49ers (1995-96) before accepting a position as an Assistant Athletic Trainer for the NFL Europe Amsterdam Admirals in 1997. After his time in Amsterdam, Tanaka spent the next two seasons at the University of California where he was Head Athletic Trainer for men’s basketball and the men’s and women’s swim teams. Tanaka received a bachelor’s degree in physical education from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in 1994 and in 2001 earned a master’s degree in kinesiology from San Jose State.


Segment Two (12:52): Dr. Cole and Steve discusses Steam vs. Sauna: is there any real therapeutic benefit beyond relaxation and soothing sore muscles?


Segment Three (17:38): Amy Kiesler, Occupational/Hand Therapist from Athletico discusses the types of overuse hand injuries from the use of cell phones and how to avoid and treat them. 

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Amy has over 20 years of experience treating patients with upper extremity injuries and was the original Director of Occupational Therapy for Athletico. She is contributing author of the Diagnosis and Treatment Manual for Physicians and Therapists. Amy has lectured at National Conferences, including Hand Care in Indianapolis, Indiana and at the American Society for Surgery of the Hand in Chicago, Illinois.

She has extensive knowledge in treating upper extremity conditions and taught classes on splinting, wound care, treating modalities, and flexor tendon injuries. A former patient of Amy’s, Frank Thomas from the Chicago White Sox recognized her during his speech for induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame, thanking her for the rehab she performed on him that enabled him to return to baseball after a significant injury.

Amy looks forward to the opportunity to treat your upper extremity conditions.