Foot & Ankle Allografts; The NBA Combine; Spectator Sports & Long Flight Stretches

Episode 17.06 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One (02:36): Dr. Brett Sachs for AlloSource discusses the most common uses of allograft transplants in treating foot and ankle defects; the evolution and new innovations in treatments; ongoing stem cell research at AlloSource.

Image result for foot & ankle allograft

Dr. Sachs is a board-certified foot and ankle surgeon and part owner of Rocky Mountain Foot & Ankle Center. Dr. Sachs studied biology at the University of Maryland and completed his Doctor of Podiatric Medicine degree at Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine. He completed a 3-year podiatric surgical residency at Presbyterian/St. Luke’s Medical Center in Denver, Colorado, followed by an orthopedic trauma residency at Kaiser Permanente.

For More Information Please Visit AlloSource.org


Segment Two (11:21): Dr. Cole talks with Steve about wrapping up the end of season with the Chicago Bulls, overview of injuries, off-season activities and the 2017 NBA Combine.


 Segment Three (19:44): Anne Bierman PT, DPT, SCS from Athletico talks about the importance of stretching and posture while at spectator sports and during long flights. The combination of cramped flights and sitting for hours on end during games often leads to back pain and muscle soreness for fans. What are the signs of injury and muscle strain from sedentary activity that you should be aware of. 

Anne Marie Bierman (“Anny”) received her Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science, MPT, and DPT all through Saint Louis University.  At SLU, she was an All-Conference and All-Region soccer player, and Female Athlete of the Year in 2004.  She is a board-certified clinical specialist in sports physical therapy and certified in Astym.  Anny represents the Eastern Central District of the IPTA on both Nominating Committee and as a State Assembly Representative.

Complimentary Injury Screens

  • Free assessment & education regarding potential injury by a licensed medical professional
  • Convenient and easy scheduling
  • Injury care plan or physician referral, if needed
  • Request a Complimentary Injury Screen

Learn more…

The Growth of Platform Tennis; Review of the NBA Research Committee

Episode 17.05 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One (01:20): Dr. Jeremy Alland from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about the definition and growth of Platform Tennis, unusually high rate of related injuries and the importance of warming up prior to play. Dr. Alland graduated from Rush Medical College in Chicago, IL, where he was awarded the prestigious William H. Harrison, PhD Award for selfless leadership, aspiration and collaboration. He went on to complete a Family Medicine residency at UPMC St. Margaret Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA, where he served as Chief Resident and was peer-selected as the best resident teacher.

ABC7’s Judy Hsu reports on the growing popularity of platform tennis, which is played outdoors in the winter. Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush recently completed the first-ever national survey of ‘paddle tennis’ players who reported that two-thirds had sustained an injury due to the sport. Of those, one half had sustained more than one injury. Dr. Jeremy Alland, sports  medicine physician, talks about the risk of the sport and platform tennis players talk about what keeps them coming back.

Segment Two (13:50): Dr. Cole as Chairman of the NBA Research Committee andImage result for nba injuries Steve Kashul discuss the work of the committee in tracking and sharing data on performance and injuries in the NBA; how this data is used to minimize future injuries and maximize the performance of valuable professional players.

The initiative is in partnership with General Electric Healthcare. It is spearheaded by a 20-person strategic advisory board comprising team physicians and clinical researchers from various fields, including orthopedics, sports medicine, radiology and epidemiology.

 “NBA players are among the best athletes in the world, and their well-being is the league’s highest priority,” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said in a statement released to ESPN.com. “Our support for medical research through our partnership with GE Healthcare will help us improve the long-term health and wellness of NBA players. We are also excited that this research collaboration will provide important insights to athletes at all levels.”

3 ANKLE MOBILITY EXERCISES FOR BASKETBALL PLAYERS

Your ankles keep you nimble and agile on the basketball court, so taking care of them is critical to how well you play. Not to mention, weak ankles put undue stress on your knees, according to Danny McLarty, CSCS, of USAB.com.

Luckily, there are a number of simple exercises that help improve ankle mobility while strengthening them to protect against injury. Add these exercises into your regular workout routine and practices to improve performance and prevent strains, breaks and sprains.

JUMP ROPE

Working out your ankles in different angles mimics the same type of angles your anklesjump rope encounter during a basketball game. Grab a jump rope and start skipping.

How to: Avoid boredom, and work your ankles from every angle, with this short interval routine.

Standard up-down – 20 seconds
Side to side – 20 seconds
Front to back – 20 seconds

Rest and repeat 2 to 3 times.


FULL SQUAT

The full squat helps improve both ankle strength, mobility and give you power forjump rope jumping up for rebounds or shooting.

How to: Stand with feet hip-width apart and hinge your hips backward, keeping your back straight. Go past the parallel squat point, until your knees are at a 135-degree angle. The key is to keep your heels and toes on the ground. You may naturally pull your heels up, which shows tightness in the calves. Keeping the weight on your heels, and keeping them down, helps improve ankle strength and mobility.

Complete 6 to 8 reps for 2 to 3 rounds.


LUNGES

Lunges work on stabilizing your ankle muscles as your weight shifts when you sprintjump rope down the court or change direction on defense or when driving to the basket.

How to: Stand with feet hip-width apart, and step forward, keeping your back leg straight and your front leg slightly bent-knee should be at a 90-degree angle. Put all your weight on the front foot to push yourself back to standing position. Repeat with the opposite leg to complete one rep.

Repeat 10 times on each leg for 2 to 3 rounds. You can further improve mobility with backward, diagonal and lateral lunges.


Use these simple exercises to improve ankle mobility and strength. Not only will it protect you against injury during basketball, but you’ll also become a stronger, more agile player on the court.

BY FARA ROSENZWEIG for BetterBraces.com

Introducing the first-ever mascot specialist doctor at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush

Introducing the first-ever mascot specialist doctor at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush – the one and only Benny The Bull!