Dr. Kathleen Weber Featured on BullsTV Pre-Game Live

Dr. Kathleen Weber, sports medicine primary care physician and team physician for theMORGif-180x150-link Chicago Bulls joined BullsTV host Steve Kashul during Bulls Pre-Game Live on December 19th, 2016. Dr. Weber discussed the NBA’s new Concussion Protocol and the efforts being made to protect all players from returning too soon to the court.

Kashul and Dr. Weber also talked about how the physicians at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush all work together in treating the Chicago Bulls players.

 

ACL Bracing by DonJoy

HELPING WITH PREVENTION, PROTECTION & HEALING

acl-bracing

DonJoy pioneered the concept of functional knee bracing more than 30 years ago. Our first prototypes were simple neoprene sleeves sewn together in the Carlsbad, Calif. garage of our founders, Philadelphia Eagles Offensive Line Captain Mark Nordquist and local lawyer Ken Reed. Those first braces came from a deep understanding of the need for prevention, protection and healing, and DonJoy has led the profession of performance ever since by studying the body, listening to athletes, consulting physicians and pushing the envelope of innovation.

THE PERCEPTION

The overall perception of knee bracing technology available to most patients today is that “everyday” knee braces can be unsightly, bulky, heavy, minimally effective, restrictive and uncomfortable. These misconceptions combine to produce “brace anxiety” among many patients, often preventing mainstream adoption and compliance of braces that can help prevent injuries, allow people to remain active while healing, and protect the knee from future injury.

THE REALITY

Patients are looking for quick, effective and economic options for maintaining or regaining their life activities; most want to delay expensive, invasive surgeries. While some patients are turning to the use of prescription narcotics (which can lead to addiction) and cortisone shots to manage their pain, these treatment options do not provide stability to the knee.

THE FACTS

Young people between the ages of 15-25 account for half of all ACL injuries.

A person who has torn their ACL has a 15 times greater risk of a second ACL injury during the initial 12 months after ACL reconstruction, and risk of ACL injury to the opposite knee is two times that of the restructured knee.

Many athletes don’t return to sport after ACL reconstruction due to fear of re-injury.

BRACING FOR PREVENTION

Given the physicality of football, it’s easy to understand why collegiate and professional linemen wear braces on both knees. The line of scrimmage is an environment prone to knee injuries, so team doctors, athletic trainers and coaches don’t hesitate to equip their players with bilateral (both knees) custom braces.

As with helmets and shoulder pads, knee braces have become standard equipment to assist in preventing season-ending knee injuries. And the same logic holds true with skiing, snowboarding, soccer, basketball, volleyball, professional rodeo, water sports and others. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

bracing

BRACING POST INJURY

Why brace after ACL reconstruction? Clinicians will typically prescribe a functional knee brace after the patient has regained full range of motion—that’s usually between three to five months after surgery. Graft strength of the new ACL is considerably weaker than the native (original) ACL during the first 12 months, so a brace during this early period helps protect it from harmful forces that occur in everyday life or in sport.defiance-300x250

Bracing also elevates a patient’s confidence, allowing them to return to their previous or enhanced level of activity. Just look to athletes including Robert Griffin III, Tiger Woods, Adrian Peterson, Tom Brady, Lindsey Vonn, Matt Ryan and Peyton Manning just to name a few. Another important reason? Peace of mind. A functional knee brace provides not only confidence for the patient, but confidence for the surgeon, knowing that their patient’s knee is protected.

3 KNEE STRENGTHENING EXERCISES FOR BASKETBALL PLAYERS

knee strengthening exercises for basketball

Basketball is a fast-moving sport that demands endurance from the players and strength and flexibility in the knees-sudden stops, pivots and jumps put pressure and strain on this area of the leg, often leading to injuries.

You can work to prevent knee injuries and pain by taking care of your body. Use these exercises, all of which work to strengthen the ligaments and muscles around your joints, to become a better player with strong, resilient knees.

LATERAL LUNGES

Sometimes, simple, traditional bodyweight exercises are all you need. That’s the case with lateral lunges, which put a slight twist on the traditional movement, placing all the focus on strengthening your quads and your knees.

This movement also improves force absorption in the knees and teaches your body how to control your weight during fast, directional movements.

Directions: Stand with feet hip-width apart and keep your upper body straight. Step out with your right foot and lean down into your right leg so that you’re squatting on just one side. Keep the left leg and back straight-don’t lean forward. Push off from your right foot to return to start. Repeat on the left side for one rep. Aim for 8 to 10 reps.


BODYWEIGHT QUARTER SQUAT

The benefit of a bodyweight quarter squat is a matter of pure volume. As opposed to aquarter squat parallel squat, where the body often tires after 8 to 10 reps, quarter squats allow you to do 20 to 30 reps, directing extra attention to your knees and quads.

Directions: Push hips back, keep back straight and “sit down” just slightly so that your knees are at a 45-degree angle. Return to start to complete one rep. Aim to complete 20 to 30 quarter squats, in the middle of your workout.


PHYSIOBALL LEG CURL

This exercise helps to strengthen your knees, hamstrings and core-all of which play an important role when pivoting and stabilizing your body during a game. This is a great exercise for the end of your workout, being slower-paced and performed on the ground.

physioball leg curlphysioball leg curl extended

Directions: Lay on a mat, and place your heels on a physioball so that your legs are straight out in front of you. Keeping your core engaged and hips raised, roll the ball in toward your body, so your knees are bent and the physioball is now below the balls of your feet. Return to start for one rep. Aim for 10 to 12 reps.

It’s important for basketball players to focus on strengthening their knees and the muscles and ligaments surrounding them. Not only will it help you stay injury free, but it will make you a stronger player as well. Incorporate these simple exercises into two or three workouts during the week to feel a difference in your knees and your game.

BY FARA ROSENZWEIG for betterbraces.com

Reward Yourself at CEO Challenges; Complex Knee Injuries in Pro Athletes; NBA vs NFL Injuries

Episode 16.34 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One:  The President of CEO Challenges, Ted Kennedy talks about the Camaraderie, Experience & Opportunity provided by CEO Challenges. Meet and compete with fellow C-suite executives that share your passion and interests. You’ll start out as strangers and finish as lifelong friends.

ted-kennedy

Ted’s background is unique in the fitness industry and includes the following highlights:

  • 20 years in sales and marketing with packaged goods companies (Quaker Oats / Best Foods)
  • One of the original founders of IRONMAN North America (launching IRONMAN races in the USA)
  • Hosted the first ever CEO IRONMAN Challenge in Lake Placid in 2001
  • Started CEO Challenges with an exclusive license deal from IRONMAN in 2005
  • Sold his company to $1.4 billion Life Time Fitness in 2012 with the agreement to run it for five years

Ted has been interviewed by most major business news and fitness publications for hisCEO Challenges knowledge and relationship with CEOs that have a passion for endurance events. The CEO Challenge database includes 1,900 opt-in subscribers who receive monthly newsletters with race results and announcing new CEO Challenge events around the world. CEO Challenges enjoys an 83% post-event rating of ‘exceeded’ or ‘far exceeded’ expectations from some of the world’s most discerning customers.


nfl-knee-injurySegment Two: Dr. Brian Cole discusses the prevalence and his experience with
cartilage and complex knee issues in professional athletes; new techniques in dealing with the long recovery times; load related activity & pain management.


Segment Three:  Captain Matthew T. Provencher, MD MC USN with the Steadman Philippon Research Institute and Head Team Physician with the New England Patriots during their 2014 Super Bowl Championship Season. Dr. Provencher talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about his work in research; NBA vs NFL injuries and experience in setting up the Navy Seal Special Forces Tactical Athlete program.

Matthew T. ProvencherDr. Provencher graduated in 1993 with highest honors from the United States Naval Academy and was the Secretary of the Navy Distinguished Graduate, where he was an all-American rower. He earned his medical degree with Honors from Dartmouth Medical School in 1998.

He has served as Chief of Sports Medicine at The Massachusetts General since April 2013 and has been with the Patriots for the last two seasons. He also serves as a Professor of Surgery and Orthopaedics at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) and is a Visiting Professor at The Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Provencher completed his orthopaedic residency at the Naval Medical Center San Diego and his orthopaedic shoulder knee and sports surgery fellowship at Rush University in Chicago. A prolific researcher, he has received numerous academic and research awards including the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Aircast Award, The International Society of Arthroscopy, Knee Surgery and Orthopaedic Sports Medicine (ISAKOS) Science Award.

He was also selected for several prestigious traveling fellowships, including the AOSSM Asia-Pacific, the American Orthopaedic Association (AOA) John Fahey North American Traveling Fellowship, and the American-British-Canadian (ABC) Fellowship. In addition, he has received multiple peer-reviewed research grants totaling over $1.5M to study topics such as shoulder instability, rotator cuff injuries, and ACL tears from funding agencies including, OREF, PRORP, and The Department of the Army and Navy.

Ankle Injuries; Bone Bruises; Men’s Health

Episode 16.33 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One: Dr. Simon Lee from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discusses sprains, dr-simon-leeachilles and other foot and ankle injuries; bracing vs taping. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS), 25 percent of all injuries from sports are to the foot and ankle. Athletes who play certain sports with sudden foot movements, such as hockey, basketball, football and tennis, are at a greater risk of ankle injuries. However, The Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine reports that the sports that cause the most ankle injuries are boys’ and girls’ basketball and girls’ gymnastics.

For dancers, the rate of ankle injuries is even higher than for those who play sports. A full 50 percent of dancers’ injuries are to the foot or ankle. Dancers’ feet and ankles endure twists, turns and heavy load during practices and performances. In addition, they are under pressure to stay thin and may eat too few nutrients, exacerbating injuries by weakening their bones and muscles. A minor injury to the ankle will leave athletes or dancers sidelined for at least two weeks. However, a major ankle injury, like a severe sprain or Achilles rupture, can take months to heal. If an athlete doesn’t allow enough time for recovery, they are at risk of sustaining a re-injury.

While there is a rising number foot and ankle injuries in athletes and dancers, researchAnkles for Life shows that these injuries can be prevented by performing ankle balance, stretching and strengthening exercises and alternating with another sport. This is why the Midwest Orthopedics at Rush (MOR) and the Illinois Athletic Trainers Association (IATA) have teamed up to promote awareness and prevention of ankle injuries.Ankles for Life aims to provide essential information regarding specific ankle injuries and tips for preventing these injuries in the future.


Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole discuss the recent bone bruise injury suffered by Michael Carter Williams of the Chicago Bulls. Definition, causes, diagnosis, treatment, recovery and decisions on when to return to play.

(Getty Images)

Bulls guard Michael Carter-Williams will miss four to six weeks with a left knee bone bruise. Carter-Williams suffered the injury while taking a hard fall on defense. An MRI revealed no ligament damage in his knee, the team said.


Segment Three: Brett Wapotish from Athletico specializes in pelvic floor disorders in men and describes the causes, symtoms and treatment. Chances are you have heard the month of November referred to as Movember several times over the last few years. While the first thing that comes to mind is probably mustaches, it is important to know that there is a bigger cause behind the Movember movement.

movemberMovember brings awareness to common men’s health issues, such as cancer and heart disease, as well as highlights the benefits of living a healthy lifestyle. Athletico has supported the Movember movement for three years via our AthletiMo team, which anyone can join to help raise funds and spread the word about men’s health.

Learn more about how you can participate with the AthletiMo’s

athletico300x250