Selection of Athletic Performance Training Shoe and Training NBA Players

In this segment Dr. Brian Cole of Midwest Orthopedics at Rush & Steve Kashul talk with Dalton Walker, Team Leader at Road Runner Sports of Chicago, about the science of determining the proper  athletic-performance shoe. Dalton explains how several factors including sport, gait and previous injury information will help determine the best fit and best outcome for the perfect shoe.

Also in this segment, Alex Perris, General Manager of RiverNorthCrossfit discusses his techniques as personal trainer and personal experiences training NBA players. Born and raised in New York City, Alex moved to Chicago in 2008 to become full time personal trainer to former Chicago Bulls star Joakim Noah.

He still works with NBA players and other Pro Basketball players. Alex served active duty in the United States Air Force and specializes in general strength and conditioning training and holds CrossFit Level 1 and Level 2 certification. He is available for 1 on 1 training.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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What To Know About Victor Oladipo’s Quad Injury

Indiana Pacers guard Victor Oladipo suffered a torn quadriceps tendon in his right knee and will miss the remainder of the NBA season, the team announced Thursday. Surgery will be required to repair the tendon.

Dr. Adam Yanke, a sports medicine orthopedic surgeon from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, and head team physician for the Windy City Bulls answers three questions about the injury and expected recovery.


Q: What exactly is a ruptured quadriceps tendon?

A: The quadriceps tendon attaches the entire quad muscle to the kneecap or the patella and allows you to straighten your leg. This tendon can commonly have inflammation in it that causes pain but it can occasionally also rupture. This injury is more common in individuals over 50 years of age but can happen in younger, athletic patients as well. Typically this happens from the tendon being overloaded but can also be due to some underlying tendon disease that weakens the tissue before injury.

Q: How do you repair a torn quadriceps tendon?

A: There are multiple ways to fix a quadriceps tendon tear with regards to specific surgical technique. Regardless of the specifics, they all involve an open approach to directly visualize the tendon. Once you can see the tear directly sutures are placed through the tendon and they are either brought through drill tunnels or anchors in the patella to perform the repair. Typically the soft tissue adjacent to the tendon called the retinaculum is also torn and this requires repair as well.

Q: What is the rehab and recovery process?

A: The recovery after quadriceps tendon repair typically involves a period of immobilization in a brace for 4-6 weeks. After this time, we work aggressively on range of motion try to eliminate any stiffness. There is always a balance between healing and motion and it is important to have both be successful for return to play. Some patients do get back to full activity without pain or restrictions, however there is a subset that still have discomfort in that area or have issues with building up muscle strength. In general its a successful procedure with good outcomes but can take up to 6 months for complete recovery.


Dr. Adam Yanke’s clinical interests include advanced arthroscopy, shoulderImage replacement, and a special focus on patellofemoral dysfunction and cartilage restoration. Dr. Yanke is a team physician for the Chicago Bulls, Windy City Bulls, Chicago White Sox and DePaul Blue Demons.

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Why Sweat Testing Matters?

Research shows that at only about 2 percent loss of body weight through sweat, performance begins to decline. Gatorade Sports Science Institute scientist Lisa Heaton and dietitian Linda Samuels traveled to the Advocate Center to conduct sweat testing during a Windy City Bulls practice. The results are used to help create personalized fuel and hydration plans for each individual player.

Dr. Chuck Bush Joseph of Midwest Orthopedics at Rush, Steve Kashul & Linda Samuels discuss Gatorade’s Contribution to Sports Nutrition Consulting and Sweat Testing: Why sweat testing matters and what the players and the league are getting out of it.

Linda Samuels, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN is a Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics. She is owner of Training Table Sports Nutrition, in Chicago. Linda has specialized in Ironman length tri-nutrition for 12 years.

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Shoulder Instability Surgery- Reliable Results For Most Athletes

By Dev Mishra, M.D., President, Sideline Sports Doc, Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University

Key Points:

  • Many young athletes with a shoulder dislocation from sports activity will choose to have shoulder stabilization surgery
  • Modern arthroscopic surgery techniques generally result in extremely stable shoulders for 90% of athletes and high satisfaction

I wrote last week about improvements in ACL surgery over the last 25 years and this week I’d like to explore improved results from another commonly performed sports medicine surgery- stabilization surgery for the dislocating shoulder. The results here mirror those of ACL surgery in many ways.

Many young athletes dislocate a shoulder from trauma, typically a dive with the arm outstretched overhead. This can happen in any sport involving that kind of motion, and any contact sport.

Most surgeries were performed through a large “open” incision 25 years ago, but nowadays can be performed arthroscopically in most cases. For uncomplicated stabilization of shoulders that have had a small number of dislocations from trauma, we should expect 90% of shoulders to remain stable and satisfaction rates upwards of 80% out to about 5 years with current methods, for recreational athletes.

Early Open Surgery Methods- Very Good At Stabilizing, Not So Good At Retaining Motion

Historically, the open surgery was for an unstable shoulder was reported in the early 1900s. A surgeon named “Bankart” first described the essential anatomy of the torn ligament and labrum stabilizing the shoulder in 1923, and for the most part we still generically refer to a shoulder stabilization as a “Bankart repair”.

Over the decades as additional knowledge was gained, modifications to the original procedures were developed. A key component surrounded understanding why surgeries on shoulders with many dislocations tended to do poorly compared to ones with only a few dislocations. While there are many factors, restoring bone loss that resulted from the dislocations was a major advancement.

As it turned out, open stabilization was extremely effective at providing excellent stabilization, with low re-dislocation rates.  But it came at a price. The rehabilitation was difficult and often resulted in permanent motion loss. Some techniques had unacceptably high rates of early arthrits. The end result was that many folks ended up with a stable shoulder but were unhappy about the result.

Arthroscopic Stabilization- Much Better At Retaining Motion With Excellent Stability

 “Arthroscopy” involves small incisions, with the surgeon visualizing and performing repairs through the small incisions. There are numerous advantages over open surgery.  Arthroscopy avoids some complications of open incisions, is generally faster, has minimal blood loss, is more comfortable after surgery, and generally leads to a faster return to sports with excllent joint motion.

And yet, in its earliest years, arthroscopic stabilization had a higher dislocation rate than open surgery. As it has been with ACL reconstruction surgery, arthroscopic shoulder stabilization has improved substantially over the years. Better surgical technique, improved surgical implants, and cutting-edge rehabilitation all play a role.

Measuring the ultimate outcome from arthroscopic shoulder stabilization surgery can involve many factors. Is there another dislocation after surgery? How is the range of motion? What’s the patient’s level of sport activity? How does the patient feel about their result?

If you’re a young athlete with an unstable shoulder, and you have a strong desire to resume a contact or collision sport you’ll likely want to consider shoulder stabilization surgery. Find an experienced shoulder surgeon and have a thorough discussion. You’ll have to work hard on your rehab and be patient but you should generally end up with an excellent result.

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