If These Walls could Talk-Chicago Bears; The Return of Zach LaVine; Understanding Probiotics

Episode 17.31 Rerun


Segment One (01:27):  Former Chicago Bear Otis Wilson talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about how the game has changed from 1985 and about his new book, If These Walls Could Talk: Chicago Bears: Stories from the Chicago Bears Sideline, Locker Room, and Press Box. Led by stars like Walter Payton, Jim McMahon, Mike Singletary, William “Refrigerator” Perry, head coach Mike Ditka, and defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan, the Chicago Bears in the 1980s were an NFL powerhouse.

As anyone who’s seen “The Super Bowl Shuffle” surely knows, they were also an unforgettable group of characters. Otis Wilson, the Bears starting outside linebacker, was right in the center of the action, and in this book, Wilson provides a closer look at the great moments and personalities that made this era legendary. Readers will meet the players, coaches, and management and share in their moments of triumph and defeat. Be a fly on the wall as Wilson recounts stories from those days in Chicago, including the 1985 Super Bowl-winning season. If These Walls Could Talk: Chicago Bears will make fans a part of the team’s storied history.


Segment Two (12:58): Dr. Cole and Steve discuss the return of Zach LaVine and the rehab process after ACL reconstruction. Fred Hoiberg confirmed that the Bulls will be bringing Zach LaVine (knee) along slowly once he’s cleared for contact.Zach LaVine #8 of the Chicago Bulls poses for a portrait during the 2017-18 NBA Media Day on September 25, 2017 at the United Center in Chicago, Illinois.

“We’ll still take things slow,’’ Hoiberg said. “We won’t throw him out for an hour scrimmage the first day he gets cleared for contact. It will be a gradual process. But he’s doing great, doing everything he’s supposed to do.’’
LaVine is on track to be cleared for contact within the next few weeks, but the Bulls will be taking an extremely cautious approach with his return, so it could be a while until he’s fully up to speed working without restrictions.

Segment Three (19:41): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling decribes probiotics, why and when they should be used.

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts that are good for your health, especially your digestive system. We usually think of bacteria as something that causes diseases. But your body is full of bacteria, both good and bad. Probiotics are often called “good” or “helpful” bacteria because they help keep your gut healthy.

Image result for probiotics

Good bacteria are naturally found in your body. You can find probiotics in some foods and supplements.

It’s only been since about the mid-1990s that people have wanted to know more about probiotics and their health benefits. Doctors often suggest them to help with digestive problems. And because of their newfound fame, you can find them in everything from yogurt to chocolate.

THREE-SPORT ATHLETE GETS BACK IN THE GAME AFTER TISSUE TRANSPLANT

By AlloSource: Doing More with Life

JAKE
RECIPIENT OF: BONE AND CARTILAGE

Jake’s life was never without sport: as one season ended, another began. Soccer became basketball, basketball became track, and he enjoyed the athletic challenge of each sport. However, constant knee pain threatened to put Jake on the bench.

Jake’s knee pain started three years ago and doctors suggested he try stretching and physical therapy to remedy the problem, but the pain persisted. When running or playing soccer, his knee would sometimes give out and it became clear to Jake and his parents that more medical attention was necessary.

“I didn’t feel that I was able to compete to my full potential,” said Jake. “I had an obvious limp when running, but I didn’t know what was causing it.”

After an MRI, Jake’s doctor diagnosed him with Osteochondritis dissecans, a joint condition in which cartilage and bone in the knee become loose. Though he was in the midst of a basketball season and looking forward to track, Jake’s diagnosis forced him to stop playing.

Jake and his family sought a second opinion after his diagnosis and they met Dr. John Polousky of HealthONE Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children in Denver. After weighing his options, Jake and his doctor moved forward with surgery. During the procedure, Dr. Polousky used bone and cartilage allografts to replace the damaged tissue and realigned the weight-bearing line in Jake’s leg.

Jake understood prior to his surgery that a deceased tissue donor made the bone and cartilage allografts possible.

“My immediate reaction was sadness. Today I am very appreciative that the person chose to be a donor and wanted to help someone beyond their own life.”

Part of Jake’s recovery included the use of  an external fixator with metal pins anchored into entry points in his leg. “After the surgery I noticed all of the attention I received from strangers. I don’t think they had ever seen an external fixator, and it did look strange,” he said.

Jake recently had the external fixator removed and has started his exercise regimen again. He rides his bike 12 miles per day and does not have any pain.

Receiving donated tissue affirmed Jake’s belief in donation. He registered as a donor when he got his driver’s license and hopes that others will consider registering too.

“I have felt the impact of what it really means to receive something from someone you don’t know. I would be interested in knowing about my donor’s life because
they are a part of me now. He or she made it possible for me to be healthy, so that I can do the things I like to do.”

The Effects of Playing Multiple High School Sports on National Basketball Association Players’ Propensity for Injury and Athletic Performance

Athletes who specialize in their sport at an early age may be at risk for burnout, overuse injury, and reduced attainment of elite status. Timing of sport specialization has not been studied in elite basketball athletes.

National Basketball Association (NBA) players who played multiple sports during adolescence would be less likely to experience injury and would have higher participation rates in terms of games played and career length compared with single-sport athletes.

Descriptive epidemiology study.

First-round draft picks from 2008 to 2015 in the NBA were included in the study. From publically available records from the internet, the following data were collected for each athlete: participation in high school sports, major injuries sustained in the NBA, percentage of games played in the NBA, and whether the athlete was still active in the NBA. Athletes who participated in sports in addition to basketball during high school were defined as multisport athletes and were compared with athletes who participated only in basketball in high school.

Two hundred thirty-seven athletes were included in the study, of which 36 (15%) were multisport athletes and 201 (85%) were single-sport athletes in high school. The multisport cohort played in a statistically significantly greater percentage of total games (78.4% vs 72.8%; P < .001). Participants in the multisport cohort were less likely to sustain a major injury during their career (25% vs 43%, P= .03). Finally, a greater percentage of the multisport athletes were active in the league at time of data acquisition, indicating increased longevity in the NBA (94% vs 81.1%; P = .03).

While a minority of professional basketball athletes participated in multiple sports in high school, those who were multi-sport athletes participated in more games, experienced fewer major injuries, and had longer careers than those who participated in a single sport. Further research is needed to determine the reasons behind these differences.

The American Journal of Sports Medicine

If These Walls could Talk-Chicago Bears; The Return of Zach LaVine; Understanding Probiotics

Episode 17.31 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One (01:27):  Former Chicago Bear Otis Wilson talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about how the game has changed from 1985 and about his new book, If These Walls Could Talk: Chicago Bears: Stories from the Chicago Bears Sideline, Locker Room, and Press Box. Led by stars like Walter Payton, Jim McMahon, Mike Singletary, William “Refrigerator” Perry, head coach Mike Ditka, and defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan, the Chicago Bears in the 1980s were an NFL powerhouse.

As anyone who’s seen “The Super Bowl Shuffle” surely knows, they were also an unforgettable group of characters. Otis Wilson, the Bears starting outside linebacker, was right in the center of the action, and in this book, Wilson provides a closer look at the great moments and personalities that made this era legendary. Readers will meet the players, coaches, and management and share in their moments of triumph and defeat. Be a fly on the wall as Wilson recounts stories from those days in Chicago, including the 1985 Super Bowl-winning season. If These Walls Could Talk: Chicago Bears will make fans a part of the team’s storied history.


Segment Two (12:58): Dr. Cole and Steve discuss the return of Zach LaVine and the rehab process after ACL reconstruction. Fred Hoiberg confirmed that the Bulls will be bringing Zach LaVine (knee) along slowly once he’s cleared for contact.Zach LaVine #8 of the Chicago Bulls poses for a portrait during the 2017-18 NBA Media Day on September 25, 2017 at the United Center in Chicago, Illinois.

“We’ll still take things slow,’’ Hoiberg said. “We won’t throw him out for an hour scrimmage the first day he gets cleared for contact. It will be a gradual process. But he’s doing great, doing everything he’s supposed to do.’’
LaVine is on track to be cleared for contact within the next few weeks, but the Bulls will be taking an extremely cautious approach with his return, so it could be a while until he’s fully up to speed working without restrictions.

Segment Three (19:41): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling decribes probiotics, why and when they should be used.

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts that are good for your health, especially your digestive system. We usually think of bacteria as something that causes diseases. But your body is full of bacteria, both good and bad. Probiotics are often called “good” or “helpful” bacteria because they help keep your gut healthy.

Image result for probiotics

Good bacteria are naturally found in your body. You can find probiotics in some foods and supplements.

It’s only been since about the mid-1990s that people have wanted to know more about probiotics and their health benefits. Doctors often suggest them to help with digestive problems. And because of their newfound fame, you can find them in everything from yogurt to chocolate.

Billy Garrett Jr. thrives in defiance of Sickle Cell Disease; Transform your Health with the Toxin Take-down Course

Episode 17.29 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One (01:33): Billy Garrett Jr. talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about his Sickle Cell condition, how he trains and has played at the highest level at DePaul University and now currently with the NY Knicks G League. The 6-foot-5 Chicago native has the “SC” form of sickle cell disease, statistically milder than the “SS” form. It is different from sickle cell trait, which can cause muscle breakdown during intense exercise.

Billy Garrett Jr.

Garrett Jr.’s condition, in short: Red blood cells mutate into a “sickle” shape to clog vessels and limit blood flow. This can cause extreme pain emanating from joints or, worse, damage to organs. Each of these episodes is called a crisis. Triggers include stress, a lack of rest, cold temperatures (that constrict blood vessels) and dehydration — all of which describe the daily working conditions of an athlete playing high-level basketball.


Segment Two (15:20): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks about the various program levels and resources available to improve your health, your life and improve the environment.

The 14 Day Transformation Program, the Foundation Program, Master Your Metabolism Program and announcing her new Toxic Takedown Course to be launched in October.

The new program educates you on how to reduce the toxic load in your food and environment and eliminate damage from free radicals. Karen encourages all of us to visit ewg.org which provides a wealth of resources to help us live better and protect the environment.

The Environmental Working Group’s mission is to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. With breakthrough research and education, we drive consumer choice and civic action.