Injury Assessment and Updates on MLB, MBA and NFL Players

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Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks with Steve Kashul about his years as team physician for the Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls; updates on recent injuries in the MLB, MBA and NFL; description of various types of injuries, recovery time and how the injuries are diagnosed and treated to get players back in the game.

A graduate of the University of Michigan Medical School in 1983, Dr. Bush-Joseph is currently a Professor at Rush University Medical Center and the Associate Director of the Rush Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. Dr. Bush-Joseph is a respected educator of medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing orthopedic surgeons lecturing at numerous national educational meetings. He serves on the editorial board of several national orthopedic journals, including the prestigious American Journal of Sports Medicine.dr. charles bush-joseph

Long involved in the care of high school, collegiate, and recreational athletes, Dr. Bush-Joseph is a team physician for the Chicago White Sox Major League Baseball Club and Associate Team Physician for the Chicago Bulls. Through his experience with high-profile professional athletes, Dr. Bush-Joseph was elected to the Major League Baseball Medical Advisory Board and president of the Major League Baseball Team Physician Association for 2012.

This exclusive group of team physicians advises the Major League Baseball Commissioner on medical policy and emerging trends in training and the medical care of the elite athlete. Academically, Dr. Bush-Joseph is nationally renown with leadership roles in several national orthopedic societies and president of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He has authored over 140 published manuscripts and book chapters.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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The Role of a Team Physician

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Dr. Nikhil Verma from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks with Steve Kashul about his role as the Chicago White Sox Team Physician.

Dr. Verma specializes in treatment of the shoulder, elbow and knee with an emphasis on advanced arthroscopic reconstructive techniques of the shoulder, shoulder replacement, knee ligament reconstruction and articular cartilage reconstruction and meniscal transplantation.

A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Dr. Verma completed his orthopedic residency at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center. He then completed a fellowship at the Hospital for Special Surgery in sports medicine and shoulder surgery. While in New York, he served as an assistant team physician for the St. John’s University Athletic Department. He also received specialized training in treatment of shoulder and elbow disorders in the overhead throwing athlete.

Currently, Dr. Verma maintains an active clinical practice performing over 500nikhil verma procedures per year. He is Director of the Division of Sports Medicine and Director of the Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. In addition, he serves as a team physician for the Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls, and Nazareth Academy. In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Verma is actively involved in orthopedic research with interests in basic science, biomechanics and clinical outcomes, and has recently received funding for his work from Major League Baseball.

He has authored multiple peer-reviewed manuscripts in major orthopedic and sports medicine journals, numerous book chapters, and routinely serves as teaching faculty for orthopedic courses on advanced surgical techniques. He frequently serves as an invited speaker or guest surgeon for national and international orthopedic sports medicine meetings.

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Youth Pitching Study: The Effect of a Strengthening Program

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WHAT IS THE STUDY?

This study is examining the effect of a 6-week hip and core strengthening program on shoulder and elbow motion during pitching. Participants are 13-18 years old who pitch in at least one game per week on average during the season. Players will either be assigned to the control group or the strengthening program group. In the strengthening group, players will be taught a hip and core strengthening program and will be expected to complete it daily for 6 weeks. In the control group, players will continue to train as they were before enrolling in the study.

WHY HIP AND CORE STRENGTHENING?

The forces generated by the hip muscles during throwing are vital to the initiation and transfer of power to the arm. Electromyography (EMG) has shown that the legs and trunk provide rotational momentum for the arm and create over 50% of the total force and kinetic energy in a tennis serve. Other studies have shown that as a game progresses, players first show fatigue in their hip and core muscles and then lose their correct pitching form. In order to keep the same speed of their pitch while tired, players often use poor form and place themselves at risk for injury. We hope that using this conditioning program will strengthen the hip and core muscles and allow pitchers to continue pitching with proper form, therefore decreasing injuries.

WHAT WILL THE PLAYER BE EXPECTED TO DO?

When the player and parents decide to participate, the player will have baseline measurements taken, including hip range of motion, hip strength and the single leg squat test. Next, players will pitch while there are 1-inch markers attached to their arms and legs, which help us track body movements. If assigned to the strengthening group, players will be instructed on the proper completion of 10 exercises and will be instructed to do these daily before their regular practice sessions for 6 weeks. The program takes 10-15 minutes to complete. Players will also fill out a weekly compliance log of how often they do the exercises. The same tests will be repeated after the player has finished the 6 week program and then again after 6 months.

WHERE WILL THE TESTING TAKE PLACE?

The testing will take place at the new Rush University Medical Center Sports Training Facility in Oak Brook, IL.  If you believe you or your patients might qualify for one of our clinical trials or wish to be evaluated, please contact our research administrator, Kavita Ahuja, MD at (312) 563-2214 or kavita.ahuja@rushortho.com.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS AND BENEFITS?

There is minimal risk associated with participating. Risks include injury from pitching, muscle soreness or discomfort associated with completing the hip and core strengthening program. Potential benefits include improvement in the players’ pitching mechanics and/or velocity. However, that result cannot be guaranteed.

Research Graphic

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Cubs’ Yu Darvish Suffers Season-Ending Setback

Brian Cole MD of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush & Steve Kashul discuss Chicago Cubs’ Yu Darvish’s season ending injuries due to stress reaction in elbow.

Click here to have your question addressed live by Dr. Brian Cole on an upcoming show.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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