What To Know About Victor Oladipo’s Quad Injury

Indiana Pacers guard Victor Oladipo suffered a torn quadriceps tendon in his right knee and will miss the remainder of the NBA season, the team announced Thursday. Surgery will be required to repair the tendon.

Dr. Adam Yanke, a sports medicine orthopedic surgeon from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, and head team physician for the Windy City Bulls answers three questions about the injury and expected recovery.


Q: What exactly is a ruptured quadriceps tendon?

A: The quadriceps tendon attaches the entire quad muscle to the kneecap or the patella and allows you to straighten your leg. This tendon can commonly have inflammation in it that causes pain but it can occasionally also rupture. This injury is more common in individuals over 50 years of age but can happen in younger, athletic patients as well. Typically this happens from the tendon being overloaded but can also be due to some underlying tendon disease that weakens the tissue before injury.

Q: How do you repair a torn quadriceps tendon?

A: There are multiple ways to fix a quadriceps tendon tear with regards to specific surgical technique. Regardless of the specifics, they all involve an open approach to directly visualize the tendon. Once you can see the tear directly sutures are placed through the tendon and they are either brought through drill tunnels or anchors in the patella to perform the repair. Typically the soft tissue adjacent to the tendon called the retinaculum is also torn and this requires repair as well.

Q: What is the rehab and recovery process?

A: The recovery after quadriceps tendon repair typically involves a period of immobilization in a brace for 4-6 weeks. After this time, we work aggressively on range of motion try to eliminate any stiffness. There is always a balance between healing and motion and it is important to have both be successful for return to play. Some patients do get back to full activity without pain or restrictions, however there is a subset that still have discomfort in that area or have issues with building up muscle strength. In general its a successful procedure with good outcomes but can take up to 6 months for complete recovery.


Dr. Adam Yanke’s clinical interests include advanced arthroscopy, shoulderImage replacement, and a special focus on patellofemoral dysfunction and cartilage restoration. Dr. Yanke is a team physician for the Chicago Bulls, Windy City Bulls, Chicago White Sox and DePaul Blue Demons.

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Concussions in Cheerleaders: Symptoms and Treatment

By Tara Hackney, PT, DPT, OCS, KTTP for Athletico Physical Therapy

Cheerleaders are commonly seen on the sidelines of school and professional sporting events, but the sport is no longer reserved for the sidelines. Cheerleaders have their own competitions where they are in the spotlight. Competitive cheerleading participation is on the rise with teams ranging in age from 5 years old through college.

All-Star cheerleading is the name used to refer to cheer groups created for competition and not associated with any school or team. Competitive cheerleading is divided into groups according to age and each group has different levels according to experience. Cheerleaders perform tumbling, stunting and pyramids as part of their routines. As with any sport, injuries can occur.

Did you know that the most common injury in competitive cheerleading is concussions? The overall injury rate in cheerleading is low; however of those injuries, concussions account for 31.1 percent.1 You may be thinking this high rate of concussions would be from cheerleaders falling and landing on their heads. However, the cheerleading position that suffers the most concussions are the bases, the athletes who support the flyers in the air by holding them up and catching them. This position is at risk for concussions as a flyer may fall on top of them, or from a foot or elbow hitting them in the head as the flyer comes down from a stunt. In fact, it is more likely in cheerleading for a concussion to occur after contact with another athlete than with contact with the floor.

Concussion Symptoms

Any one or more of the following signs and symptoms may indicate a head injury:

  • Headache
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Coordination or balance issues
  • Blurred or double vision
  • Light and noise sensitivity
  • Feelings of sluggishness
  • Memory or concentration problems
  • Altered sleep patterns

Signs observed by coaches or other team members that may indicate a concussion has occurred:

  • Stunned or confused appearance
  • Forgets arm motions or cheers
  • Confused about formations in routines
  • Unsure of surroundings
  • Moves clumsily
  • Loss of consciousness (long or short)
  • Personality or behavior changes
  • Forgets events right before or after a blow to the head

If a head injury or concussion is suspected, the athlete should not return to play prior to 24 hours after the initial incident and should be cleared by a physician prior to returning to sport.

Concussion Management

Concussion management is evolving through research. There is strong evidence to support an active approach to rehabilitation of concussions. Physical therapy is one way to help manage the symptoms following a concussion. Physical therapy can include management of neck pain and headaches, balance exercises, progression of exercise tolerance and cardiovascular activities, and vision training. Ideally, an athlete will complete a graded exposure program that starts with symptom limited activity, progress through light aerobic activity, and transition to sport-specific incremental intensity training. Finally, the athlete will be cleared to practice prior to being cleared to compete.

Speed of recovery after concussion is individualistic for each athlete and may be affected by severity of trauma, area of the brain injured, age, gender, past medical history, and previous history of concussions.

Please visit our Concussion Page to learn more about our services.

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Why Sweat Testing Matters?

Research shows that at only about 2 percent loss of body weight through sweat, performance begins to decline. Gatorade Sports Science Institute scientist Lisa Heaton and dietitian Linda Samuels traveled to the Advocate Center to conduct sweat testing during a Windy City Bulls practice. The results are used to help create personalized fuel and hydration plans for each individual player.

Dr. Chuck Bush Joseph of Midwest Orthopedics at Rush, Steve Kashul & Linda Samuels discuss Gatorade’s Contribution to Sports Nutrition Consulting and Sweat Testing: Why sweat testing matters and what the players and the league are getting out of it.

Linda Samuels, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN is a Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics. She is owner of Training Table Sports Nutrition, in Chicago. Linda has specialized in Ironman length tri-nutrition for 12 years.

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Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush (MOR) Sports Performance Center

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David Heidloff, Athletico’s Manager of The Sports Performance Center at MOR in Oak Brook Illinois, talks with Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph and Steve Kashul about the opening of the brand new Sports Performance Center at Rush in Oak Brook IL, what services it offers and how it is different than a typical strength and conditioning facility.

At Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush (MOR) Sports Performance Center, our goal is to bridge the gap between sports medicine and sports performance. Using evidence-based methods and the world’s best equipment at our state-of-the-art facility, we are helping athletes of all levels transition from injury to a confident return to their sport. Our programs don’t just get you back to activity, they also enhance performance – building strength, improving agility, addressing injury risk factors, and bolstering confidence for athletes returning to sport.

Within our new facility in Oak Brook is a state-of-the-art sports performance center dedicated to helping patients confidently return to sport after injury with programs such as a functional sports assessment. Additional services are also available such as blood flow restriction training, video throwing assessment, strength and conditioning services and video gait analysis.

Our team has extensive experience working with athletes from the professional teams like the Chicago Bulls, Chicago White Sox and Chicago Fire as well as little leagues and club soccer teams. We believe all athletes deserve access to effective strength and conditioning programming derived from medically sound foundations.

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