Introducing the first-ever mascot specialist doctor at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush

Introducing the first-ever mascot specialist doctor at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush – the one and only Benny The Bull!

Do High Schools Need Athletic Trainers?; Understanding Elbow Injury; Advancements in Regenerative Medicine

Episode 17.02 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Katie Varnado from ATI Physical Therapy talks about the responsibilities and qualifications for Athletic Trainers, the difference between pro & non-pro team trainers, the importance of having High School Trainers and how to promote their use.

Katie Varnado is a certified and licensed athletic trainer who is passionate aboutKatie Varnado educating others about concussions, growth plate injuries in athletes, and the need for athletic trainers. In her role as Sports Medicine Director at ATI Physical Therapy, she oversees and provides guidance to the athletic trainers ATI provides to local high schools and colleges and ensures all athletes are receiving comprehensive care to return to sport as quickly and safely as possible.

Katie received her bachelor’s degree in kinesiology with a concentration in athletic training from Illinois State University.  She then went on to earn a prestigious year long sports medicine fellowship at the Steadman Hawkins Clinic in Vail, CO.  Katie has over fourteen years of experience working with both collegiate and high school athletics as well as working with physicians.


Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole discuss the various types of elbow injuries, causes and treatments. Dr. Cole describes the many new and interesting advancements in Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Therapy – the future of research and applications.

Related Posts: 

Improve your Understanding with 3D Animation on UCL Reconstruction (Tommy John Surgery)

Baseball and Softball: Pain After Pitching

Limiting Innings Pitched after Tommy John Surgery for MLB Players

Shoulder and Elbow Overuse Injuries

Overuse Injuries in Young Athletes


  

Why Spring Is the Perfect Time to Take Your Workout Outdoors

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When the weather thaws, the plants bloom and the days get longer, it’s spring—and the best time of the year to take your fitness regimen outside. Here are six research-backed perks of al fresco exercise.

You work harder

When people exercise outside, they tend to spend more time doing it. One study found that older people who were active outdoors did at least 30 minutes more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week than those who only did it inside. It also made them feel healthier. “Nothing makes you feel more childlike than being outdoors,” says Dr. Pamela Peeke, a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine and author of Fit to Live. “You’re modulating stress hormones, increasing endorphins and increasing the secretion of serotonin,” she says, so your mood brightens.

Being in nature lowers blood pressure

Spending time outside is also good for the heart. A recent study estimated that nearly 10% of people with high blood pressure could get their levels under control if they spent at least 30 minutes in a park each week, partly because of the heart-related benefits of getting fresh air and lowering stress. In Japan, public health experts recommend people spend time walking outdoors, a practice called forest bathing, or shinrin-yoku. Researchers in Japan have linked forest bathing with lower levels of the blood pressure-raising stress hormone, cortisol.

It spurs cancer-fighting cells

Some research suggests that when people are in nature, they inhale aromatic compounds from plants called phytoncides. These can increase their number of natural killer cells, a type of white blood cell that supports the immune system and is linked with a lower risk of cancer. These cells are also believed to be important in fighting infections and inflammation, a common marker of disease.

In one study, researchers found that people who took a long walk through a forest for two days in a row increased their natural killer cells by 50% and the activity of these cells by 56%. Those activity levels also remained 23% higher than usual for the month following those walks.

It can feel more fun

When people exercise outside, they feel better and enjoy the exercise more, studies suggest. “Enjoyment is an important pathway to the mental health impacts of physical activity,” says Rebecca Lovell, a research fellow at the University of Exeter in the UK. Exercising outside is also a great alternative for those who don’t want to go to the gym.

A review of research found that people who exercised outside reported feeling more revitalized, engaged and energized than those who did it indoors. The researchers also found that people who exercised outside felt less tension, anger and depression.

Your mental health may improve improve

Nature has a way of making people feel calm, and exercising outside can strengthen that effect. A small 2015 study found that people who walked for 90 minutes outside were less likely to ruminate on their problems and had less activity in the brain area linked to depression, compared to people who took similar walks but in urban areas. “Nature becomes a major distraction from all the stresses of life,” says Peeke.

You save money

Exercising outdoors is not only convenient, but it’s less expensive than a gym membership. It also cuts costs for the community. A recent study in England of “green exercises”—those done outside, including dog walking, running, horseback riding and mountain biking—estimated that the health benefits of doing physical activity in nature can save around $2.7 billion a year. “All you need is the right pair of shoes, and you can exercise on your own time,” says Peeke.

By Alexandra Sifferlin for Time Health

Chicago recreational basketball player recovers after Achilles rupture

basketball patient

“I heard a ‘bang’ and then felt as if someone stomped on the back of my left calf, slamming me down to the court. But, when I looked up, both the basketball and the other players were all several feet away staring at me. That’s when I knew I likely had a serious problem.”

This is how Ganesh Sundaram, 31, of Chicago, describes the incident that left him with a ruptured left Achilles tendon earlier this year. “I was playing with a bunch of friends on the weekend and went up for a rebound. Then, I quickly reversed my direction to get back on defense,” he explains. “I later found out that this rapid deceleration followed by acceleration and change of direction is a common cause of injury to the Achilles tendon at the back of the heel.”

He felt numbness, then pain as he limped off the court. He went directly to the nearest emergency department where the physician on duty conducted the Thompson test to determine whether or not his Achilles tendon was intact. After his foot hung loosely when his calf was squeezed, the physician told him it was most likely a full rupture and should see a foot and ankle specialist right away. Sundaram, at the suggestion of his brother-in- law (a Chicago-area physician), made an appointment with Dr. Simon Lee of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush. Dr. Lee, an expert in treating Achilles injuries, confirmed the diagnosis and presented options for both surgical and non-surgical repair of his tendon.

Given Sundaram’s very active lifestyle which included a regular fitness and full-court basketball regimen, Tough Mudder/Spartan races and keeping up with his toddler son, he chose surgery given the higher likelihood of returning to full pre-injury function, strength and mobility. They also discussed the warning signs that Sundaram experienced several months earlier. After running in high heat while dehydrated and on vacation, Sundaram felt stiffness and pain in his left Achilles tendon when getting up after a long flight home.

Concerned, he took a rest from running, jumping and basketball for a few weeks but maintained the rest of his fitness regimen. He then resumed these activities once he felt minimal discomfort, but didn’t do any pre-activity stretching or warming up and he didn’t see a physician. Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush foot and ankle physicians explain that this scenario is becoming more and more common in their practices. “Over a recent ten-year period, we have seen our number of Achilles patients increase by almost 300 percent,” explains Dr. Lee.

So many more people are participating in extreme sports, like Tough Mudders, marathons and Spartan Races. They aren’t stretching or strengthening their Achilles tendons properly – or at all. We also see lots of weekend warriors who do the same thing.

For both types of athletes, Dr. Lee and his fellow foot and ankle physicians created aMOR300x250 useful resource for athletes to keep their ankles and tendons healthy called ‘Ankles for Life’. It includes injury prevention tips in both a downloadable brochure and video format. It was developed in conjunction with the Illinois Athletic Trainers Association. Sundaram, who is now back to basketball and working out, knows that he should have listened to his body when he had heel pain several months before the rupture.

“Dr. Lee told me that surgeons have a saying that ‘healthy tendons don’t rupture’. Mine was irritated or maybe even partially torn at the time and I should have attended to it earlier,” he says. Sundaram now incorporates lower body and heel stretching and strengthening into his routine before any sports activity – and encourages all athletes to do so.

For more information on preventing Achilles injuries and to request a gym bag tag with ankle injury prevention tips, visit the Ankles for Life website.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Simon Lee to discuss your foot or ankle condition, click here or call 877-MD- BONES.

Meet the White Sox’s New Top Doc; Best Fats to Fuel your Workout

Episode 17.01 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Head team physician discusses his role keeping players on fieldDr. Nik Verma from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about his new role.  Hear how he and the other team physicians at Rush help keep Sox players healthy through the long baseball season.

  • Fellowship Director, Professor and Chief of Sports Medicine at Rush Universitynikhil verma Medical Center
  • Shoulder, Elbow and Knee Surgeon at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush
  • Head Team Physician for Chicago White Sox & Team Physician for Chicago Bulls and Nazareth Academy
  • Advanced Arthroscopic Reconstructive Techniques and Cartilage Restoration expertise
  • Voted Top 10-15% of Top Doctors in America® by U.S.NewWorld Report and Castle Connolly
  • Associate Editor of the Arthroscopy Journal and Editorial Board Member of Journal of Knee Surgery

Segment Two: Karen Malkin discusses the importance of MCTs- medium chain triglycerides: what are they and why are so many athletes adding them to their fitness plans. We tend to think carbohydrates give us the most energy.  How do MCTs compare to carbohydrates for fuel?

Best fats to cook with: Olive oil is known to be one of the healthiest fats for cardiovascular health.  Why shouldn’t we cook with olive oil? What are the best fats for high heat cooking? Can you cook with MCT oil?

Dr. Cole and Steve talk with Karen about the effectiveness of her 14 Day Transformation Program. Enter ESPN1000 in the Coupon Code box for a $100 discount.

Lifestyle and health are transformed though integrative health coaching. Karen practices a client-centered approach that acknowledges the interdependent roles of mind, body and spirit, and the innate healing capacity within each person, with an emphasis on self-care. Read more >>


  

Meet the White Sox’s New Top Doc

Head team physician discusses his role keeping players on field

Dr. Nik Verma from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush will be discussing his new role with Dr. Brian Cole & Steve Kashul on ESPN Chicago, Sports Medicine Weekly this coming Saturday, April 8th at 8:30AM . Tune in to WMVP AM 1000 to hear how he and the other team physicians at Rush help keep Sox players healthy through the long baseball season.