Youth Pitching Study: The Effect of a Strengthening Program

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WHAT IS THE STUDY?

This study is examining the effect of a 6-week hip and core strengthening program on shoulder and elbow motion during pitching. Participants are 13-18 years old who pitch in at least one game per week on average during the season. Players will either be assigned to the control group or the strengthening program group. In the strengthening group, players will be taught a hip and core strengthening program and will be expected to complete it daily for 6 weeks. In the control group, players will continue to train as they were before enrolling in the study.

WHY HIP AND CORE STRENGTHENING?

The forces generated by the hip muscles during throwing are vital to the initiation and transfer of power to the arm. Electromyography (EMG) has shown that the legs and trunk provide rotational momentum for the arm and create over 50% of the total force and kinetic energy in a tennis serve. Other studies have shown that as a game progresses, players first show fatigue in their hip and core muscles and then lose their correct pitching form. In order to keep the same speed of their pitch while tired, players often use poor form and place themselves at risk for injury. We hope that using this conditioning program will strengthen the hip and core muscles and allow pitchers to continue pitching with proper form, therefore decreasing injuries.

WHAT WILL THE PLAYER BE EXPECTED TO DO?

When the player and parents decide to participate, the player will have baseline measurements taken, including hip range of motion, hip strength and the single leg squat test. Next, players will pitch while there are 1-inch markers attached to their arms and legs, which help us track body movements. If assigned to the strengthening group, players will be instructed on the proper completion of 10 exercises and will be instructed to do these daily before their regular practice sessions for 6 weeks. The program takes 10-15 minutes to complete. Players will also fill out a weekly compliance log of how often they do the exercises. The same tests will be repeated after the player has finished the 6 week program and then again after 6 months.

WHERE WILL THE TESTING TAKE PLACE?

The testing will take place at the new Rush University Medical Center Sports Training Facility in Oak Brook, IL.  If you believe you or your patients might qualify for one of our clinical trials or wish to be evaluated, please contact our research administrator, Kavita Ahuja, MD at (312) 563-2214 or kavita.ahuja@rushortho.com.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS AND BENEFITS?

There is minimal risk associated with participating. Risks include injury from pitching, muscle soreness or discomfort associated with completing the hip and core strengthening program. Potential benefits include improvement in the players’ pitching mechanics and/or velocity. However, that result cannot be guaranteed.

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Chicago’s Greatest Sports Event of the Year

Chicago Sports Summit

The 3rd Annual Chicago Sports Summit is a half-day event featuring heavy hitters in sports. Female Olympic athletes will speak about breaking barriers and the #MeToo movement; general managers of Chicago’s pro teams will discuss secrets to navigating up and down seasons; former NFL and NHL hockey players will expose the prevalence of injuries like concussion.

Chicago Sports Summit 2018 - Wed., Oct. 3, 2018

Get Tickets Now!

Our panelists this year will be discussing the following topics, and many more:

Women in Sports: Hear from some of the most influential women who are breaking down barriers in the world of sports.

The Team Behind the Team: Experience how sports and health experts help athletes get back in the game.

A View From the Top: A perspective on Chicago’s professional sports teams from their own front office executives

Chicago’s All-Stars: Hear from some of Chicago’s very own past and present sports stars.

Click here to see MODERATORS & PANELISTS

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Cubs’ Yu Darvish Suffers Season-Ending Setback

Brian Cole MD of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush & Steve Kashul discuss Chicago Cubs’ Yu Darvish’s season ending injuries due to stress reaction in elbow.

Click here to have your question addressed live by Dr. Brian Cole on an upcoming show.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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When Turf Toe Strikes, You’ll Know What To Do

Turf toe is not a term you want to use when talking to a ballerina before her diva debut or a head football coach about his star running back.

“Turf toe” is the common term used to describe a sprain of the ligaments around the big toe joint. Although associated with athletes who play sports on artificial turf or hard surfaces, such as soccer, basketball, wrestling, gymnastics, and dance, it can happen to anyone! It’s a condition that’s caused by jamming the big toe or repeatedly pushing off the big toe forcefully as in running and jumping.

What Causes Turf Toe?

Turf toe is a sprain to the ligaments around the big toe joint, which works primarily as a hinge to permit up and down motion.

Just behind the big toe joint in the ball of your foot are two pea-shaped bones embedded in the tendon that moves your big toe called sesamoids. These bones work like a pulley for the tendon and provide leverage when you walk or run. They also absorb the weight that presses on the ball of the foot.

When you are walking or running, you start each subsequent step by raising your heel and letting your body weight come forward onto the ball of your foot. At a certain point you propel yourself forward by “pushing off” of your big toe and allowing your weight to shift to the other foot. If the toe for some reason stays flat on the ground and doesn’t lift to push off, you run the risk of suddenly injuring the area around the joint. Or if you are tackled or fall forward and the toe stays flat, the effect is the same as if you were sitting and bending your big toe back by hand beyond its normal limit, causing hyperextension of the toe. That hyperextension, repeated over time or with enough sudden force, can — cause a sprain in the ligaments that surround the joint.

What Are the Symptoms of Turf Toe?

The most common symptoms of turf toe include pain, swelling, and limited joint movement at the base of one big toe. The symptoms develop slowly and gradually get worse over time if it’s caused by repetitive injury. If it’s caused by a sudden forceful motion, the injury can be painful immediately and worsen within 24 hours. Sometimes when the injury occurs, a “pop” can be felt. Usually the entire joint is involved, and toe movement is limited.

How Is Turf Toe Diagnosed?

To diagnose turf toe, the doctor will ask you to explain as much as you can about how you injured your foot and may ask you about your occupation, your participation in sports, the type of shoes you wear, and your history of foot problems.

The doctor will then examine your foot, noting the pattern and location of any swelling and comparing the injured foot to the uninjured one. The doctor will likely ask for an X-ray to rule out any other damage or fracture. In certain circumstances, the doctor may ask for other imaging tests such as a bone scanCT scan, or MRI.

How Is Turf Toe Treated?

The basic treatment for treating turf toe, initially, is a combination of rest, ice, compression, and elevation (remember the acronym R.I.C.E).This basic treatment approach is to give the injury ample time to heal, which means the foot will need to be rested and the joint protected from further injury. The doctor may recommend an over-the-counter oral medication such as ibuprofen to control pain and reduce inflammation. To rest the toe, the doctor may tape or strap it to the toe next to it to relieve the stress on it. Another way to protect the joint is to immobilize the foot in a cast or special walking boot that keeps it from moving. The doctor may also ask you to use crutches so that no weight is placed on the injured joint. In severe cases, an orthopaedic surgeon may suggest a surgical intervention.

It typically takes two to three weeks for the pain to subside. After the immobilization of the joint ends, some patients require physical therapy in order to re-establish range of motion, strength, and conditioning of the injured toe.

Can Turf Toe Be Prevented?

One goal of treatment should be to evaluate why the injury occurred and to take steps to keep it from reoccurring. One way to prevent turf toe is to wear shoes with better support to help keep the toe joint from excessive bending and force with pushing off. You may also want to consider using specially designed inserts that your doctor or physical therapist can prescribe for you.

A physical therapist or a specialist in sports medicine can also work with you on correcting any problems in your gait that can lead to injury and on developing training techniques to help reduce the chance of injury.

 Contributed by Aetrex

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