Resistance Training and Weight Loss

By Revolution Physical Therapy & Weight Loss

It has been suggested approximately 21% of the adult population participates in some sort of resistance training at least 2 days a week (Chevan, 2008). While the popularity of strength training has increased from the days of it’s seemingly “cult” fad (refer to Arnold’s Pumping Iron), there still lies a massive misconception that those trying to lose weight should NOT focus as much on resistance training.  With more secondary information available than ever on health and fitness, it is important to dig down into the primary scholarly sources and identify of the necessity of resistance training for 31% of the population whom is categorized as obese (projected 51% of the population will be obese by 2030).

Resistance training is defined as “any type of training in which the body must move in some direction against some type of force that resists that movement”  (Stoppani,  2006). Although this definition may appear basic at first sight, it is important to place emphasis on the “some type of force” piece. Too many of us relate resistance training to meatheads lifting heavy barbells and slamming weights around. We don’t take into account that your own body weight can be used for resistance in addition to using bands, free weights like dumbbells or medicine balls.There are multiple types of resistance that can provide the stimulus needed to achieve the desired result that will assist with weight loss.

Such results are achieved through neural stimulation which causes the muscle to contract and when the muscle shortens and lengthens it creates microtears. Over time, hypertrophy (muscle growth) occurs and muscle becomes thicker and can move more weight (McArdle, Katch & Katch, 2010). As an individual increases lean mass, they burn more fat during rest and aerobic exercise. Furthermore, as a result of resistance training, daily energy levels adrenaline and other hormones (testosterone) increase (McArdle, Katch & Katch, 2010).

In conclusion, resistance training for weight loss should consist of large muscle group exercises (push, squat, pull, trunk, etc.). Repetitions should be 15-20, 2-3 sets of each exercise, preferably performed in a circuit format. It is encouraged that beginners with resistance training utilize cross training, integrating bouts of aerobic activity (walking, bicycle, elliptical, etc.) between resistance circuits to avoid accumulation of lactic acid, which can result in delayed onset muscle soreness.

In practical terms, resistance training will increase lean mass that both assist with fat burn during your “cardio” days, and also keep the weight bearing joints strong to avoid injury during these “cardio” days. For assistance with understanding what your ideal resistance training circuit should look like based on your goals, please consult with one of our expert Exercise Physiologists at one of the seven convenient Chicago area Revolution locations.

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Do High Schools Need Athletic Trainers?; Understanding Elbow Injury; Advancements in Regenerative Medicine

Episode 17.02 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Katie Varnado from ATI Physical Therapy talks about the responsibilities and qualifications for Athletic Trainers, the difference between pro & non-pro team trainers, the importance of having High School Trainers and how to promote their use.

Katie Varnado is a certified and licensed athletic trainer who is passionate aboutKatie Varnado educating others about concussions, growth plate injuries in athletes, and the need for athletic trainers. In her role as Sports Medicine Director at ATI Physical Therapy, she oversees and provides guidance to the athletic trainers ATI provides to local high schools and colleges and ensures all athletes are receiving comprehensive care to return to sport as quickly and safely as possible.

Katie received her bachelor’s degree in kinesiology with a concentration in athletic training from Illinois State University.  She then went on to earn a prestigious year long sports medicine fellowship at the Steadman Hawkins Clinic in Vail, CO.  Katie has over fourteen years of experience working with both collegiate and high school athletics as well as working with physicians.


Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole discuss the various types of elbow injuries, causes and treatments. Dr. Cole describes the many new and interesting advancements in Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Therapy – the future of research and applications.

Related Posts: 

Improve your Understanding with 3D Animation on UCL Reconstruction (Tommy John Surgery)

Baseball and Softball: Pain After Pitching

Limiting Innings Pitched after Tommy John Surgery for MLB Players

Shoulder and Elbow Overuse Injuries

Overuse Injuries in Young Athletes


  

Chicago recreational basketball player recovers after Achilles rupture

basketball patient

“I heard a ‘bang’ and then felt as if someone stomped on the back of my left calf, slamming me down to the court. But, when I looked up, both the basketball and the other players were all several feet away staring at me. That’s when I knew I likely had a serious problem.”

This is how Ganesh Sundaram, 31, of Chicago, describes the incident that left him with a ruptured left Achilles tendon earlier this year. “I was playing with a bunch of friends on the weekend and went up for a rebound. Then, I quickly reversed my direction to get back on defense,” he explains. “I later found out that this rapid deceleration followed by acceleration and change of direction is a common cause of injury to the Achilles tendon at the back of the heel.”

He felt numbness, then pain as he limped off the court. He went directly to the nearest emergency department where the physician on duty conducted the Thompson test to determine whether or not his Achilles tendon was intact. After his foot hung loosely when his calf was squeezed, the physician told him it was most likely a full rupture and should see a foot and ankle specialist right away. Sundaram, at the suggestion of his brother-in- law (a Chicago-area physician), made an appointment with Dr. Simon Lee of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush. Dr. Lee, an expert in treating Achilles injuries, confirmed the diagnosis and presented options for both surgical and non-surgical repair of his tendon.

Given Sundaram’s very active lifestyle which included a regular fitness and full-court basketball regimen, Tough Mudder/Spartan races and keeping up with his toddler son, he chose surgery given the higher likelihood of returning to full pre-injury function, strength and mobility. They also discussed the warning signs that Sundaram experienced several months earlier. After running in high heat while dehydrated and on vacation, Sundaram felt stiffness and pain in his left Achilles tendon when getting up after a long flight home.

Concerned, he took a rest from running, jumping and basketball for a few weeks but maintained the rest of his fitness regimen. He then resumed these activities once he felt minimal discomfort, but didn’t do any pre-activity stretching or warming up and he didn’t see a physician. Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush foot and ankle physicians explain that this scenario is becoming more and more common in their practices. “Over a recent ten-year period, we have seen our number of Achilles patients increase by almost 300 percent,” explains Dr. Lee.

So many more people are participating in extreme sports, like Tough Mudders, marathons and Spartan Races. They aren’t stretching or strengthening their Achilles tendons properly – or at all. We also see lots of weekend warriors who do the same thing.

For both types of athletes, Dr. Lee and his fellow foot and ankle physicians created aMOR300x250 useful resource for athletes to keep their ankles and tendons healthy called ‘Ankles for Life’. It includes injury prevention tips in both a downloadable brochure and video format. It was developed in conjunction with the Illinois Athletic Trainers Association. Sundaram, who is now back to basketball and working out, knows that he should have listened to his body when he had heel pain several months before the rupture.

“Dr. Lee told me that surgeons have a saying that ‘healthy tendons don’t rupture’. Mine was irritated or maybe even partially torn at the time and I should have attended to it earlier,” he says. Sundaram now incorporates lower body and heel stretching and strengthening into his routine before any sports activity – and encourages all athletes to do so.

For more information on preventing Achilles injuries and to request a gym bag tag with ankle injury prevention tips, visit the Ankles for Life website.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Simon Lee to discuss your foot or ankle condition, click here or call 877-MD- BONES.

Featured Body Part: Foot

By ATIPT

Our foot and ankle complex needs to be both dynamic and stable to allow for us to walkFeatured Body Part: Foot without stressing other areas in the body. The ankle may seem like a simple joint, but there are actually four bones that combine to provide the stability and motion necessary – tibia, fibular, talus, and calcaneus. The rest of the foot consists of multiple smaller bones that each must be able to withstand the movement and stress placed on it by the weight of our body. Your ankle is also an integral part of your daily function, as it is responsible for your ability to drive a car, climb stairs, and squat. If you suffer an injury to your foot/ankle it will likely become increasingly difficult to perform your normal activities without pain. The more knowledge we have regarding prevention and common causes of injuries, the better our chances are to avoid future injury.

Common Causes
Unfortunately, with the complexity of the foot/ankle joints it is often difficult to isolate a singular cause of injury. As with other body parts, increasing age leads to increased risk of injury from general wear and tear. After the ankle is injured there is a high likelihood that you can suffer another injury due to remaining deficits and/or poor healing.

  • Overuse (Chronic) Injuries – With age and use cartilage can wear down and the ligaments, muscles, and tendons can become damaged.
  • Sudden (Acute) Injuries  – During a fall or other injury, the bones of the foot/ankle can be fractured.  You can also have ligament tears and ruptures of the tendons.

Common Conditions
Foot/ankle pain can be caused by any one of these common conditions:

  • Adult Acquired Flat Feet (Fallen Arches) – Fallen arch, or flatfoot, is known medically as pes planus. This is characterized as a loss in arch height in the foot. There are many causes of this disorder, but among the most common is decreased muscular strength. The muscles in the foot and ankle are required to help support the arch and if the weaken the arch can collapse
  • Bone Fracture – There are multiple bones in the foot/ankle that can break and each needs to be managed differently. Most will require a period of not putting weight through the foot to allow for healing.
  • Metatarsalgia – Athletes who run and jump a lot may be susceptible to metatarsalgia, a type of foot injury that results in pain and inflammation in the ball of the foot.
  • Plantar Fasciitis – Affecting nearly 2 million Americans each year, Plantar Fasciitis is when there is an inflammation of the thick band of ligament that extends from the bottom of the heel to the toes (primarily the big toe).
  • Calcaneal Bursitis – In the heel, bursitis may cause bruise-like pain mostly on the bottom of the heel, but also at the back of the heel. This pain is most often felt at the end of the day, especially for people who spend much of their time on their feet.

Injury Prevention
Kurt Gengenbacher, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, CSCS a Regional Director of Clinical Excellence, gives us some tips to help prevent and rehabilitate foot/ankle injuries:

  • Stay Flexible – Make sure to stretch your calves daily. Hold those stretches for at least 30 seconds and repeat 2-3 times.
  • Keep Your Foot Strong – Focus on functionally strengthening your foot.  The foot must be able to assist in stabilizing the body while standing, so the best exercises are often in a standing position.  Try to perform appropriate balancing tasks, standing toe crunches, heel raises, and toe raises.
  • Avoid Overtraining – Make sure you vary your exercises and don’t always do the same thing. If you have pain after exercising, stop the activity, rest, ice and elevate your leg.

Rehabilitation
If you have pain in your foot/ankle that isn’t going away, rehabilitation is a great step to take to improve your functionality. During rehabilitation:

  • A Strong Foot Is A Healthy Foot – Working on strength in the small muscles of the foot (intrinsics) can help your ability to walk barefoot and on uneven surfaces.
  • Be Balanced – Work on dynamic balance exercises to improve your proprioception and ability to stay upright.
  • Don’t Let Tightness Be Your Achilles Heel – Stretching your ankles can help to improve your ability to go down stairs and squat.
  • Stay On Your Toes – Strengthening of your calf muscles can help to improve your ability to walk, run, and climb stairs.
  • Wear Proper Footwear – It is important to provide appropriate support to your foot.

When weighing your treatment options for foot pain and injuries, consider physicalATI 300x250 therapy. Physical therapy offers a wide variety of treatment options including strengthening, stretching, and sustainable home exercise programs. Stop in or call any ATI location for a complimentary injury screen or to learn more about how physical therapy can help you overcome your foot pain.

Put your best foot forward with ATI!

When Healthy Becomes a Dangerous Obsession: Exploring Orthorexia

othorexia

We’re all familiar with the term ‘clean eating’ and know how important it is to eat the right foods in the right balance, no matter what our eating regime or diet plan is. But what if this turns into an obsession that becomes out of control? Experts are now seeing a distinct rise in the number of people suffering from a condition called Orthorexia Nervosa and with it, a fixation on so called ‘self-righteous eating’.

Exploring Orthorexia

Someone with this condition will become obsessed with the quality and purity of their food, they may avoid eating out, or anything that anyone else other than themselves has touched.

Whatever diet plan or eating regime you’re following, whether young or old, getting the right balance of nutrients is important in maintaining good health for everyone.

However, the Orthorexia sufferer will go the opposite way and become very restricted in the types of foods they will eat – often turning to a raw food diet, or one that restricts many forms of good quality proteins and micronutrients needed for healthy living. Jordan Younger, blogger and founder of ‘The Balanced Blonde’ was one such sufferer, whose vegan diet became so restrictive that her periods stopped and she became fearful of eating anything with protein in it, calling eggs her ‘fear food’.

The Orthorexic Diet

As we’ve seen, despite their obsession with health and clean living, the diet of the Orthorexic can be very lacking. The condition also spills out into other areas of life too, meaning that the sufferer may become very socially isolated, withdrawn or depressed. As their obsession increases, their physical health will suffer too, with women reporting that their periods cease, their hair starts to fall out and their teeth and nails become brittle and break easily.

Side Effects of the Condition

Sufferers may end up unaware or unable to identify any of their own physical feelings towards food:

  • They may not recognize when they are hungry
  • They may not recognize when they are full
  • If they fall off the wagon and eat anything they consider to be impure, their urges to become stricter in only eating pure food will grow stronger

Treatment

Treatment for more severe cases of the condition can involve inpatient therapy and counseling, combined with anti-anxiety medications and an eating plan that will slowly reintroduce missing nutrients, proteins and minerals into the diet that have previously been cut out. It’s a highly treatable illness that has a good recovery rate.

Contributed by Jess Walter, Freelance Writer

Exercise Caution

How to stay safe while keeping fit

Exercise is essential to good health. But if you don’t use common sense while working out, you’re putting yourself at risk for injury.

As a primary care and sports medicine specialist at Rush University Medical Center, as well as a team doctor for the Chicago Bulls and Chicago White Sox, Kathy Weber, MD, MS, sees firsthand the injuries that can result from overdoing it or not using proper form during physical activities.

Here, she offers advice for safer workouts — and explains why the latest exercise craze can potentially do more harm than good.

Common exercise-related injuries.

Exercise-related injuries are commonly overuse injuries, such as stress fractures, muscle strains, patellar tendinitis or rotator cuff tendinitis, and illiotibial band syndrome (a hip disorder from injury to the thick band that runs from your hip to the outside of your knee). Basically, any activity that involves repetitive movement — running, cycling, hitting a tennis ball, swinging a golf club, etc. — can cause damage to a specific area or areas of tissue over time.

Injuries can also occur when you’re not properly conditioned for a certain type of exercise, or when you return to an activity too quickly and don’t give your body time to adjust to increased levels of activity.

Always start out slowly in terms of both the duration and the intensity so your body has time to adapt. You should gradually increase first the amount of time and then the intensity level of your workouts. Depending on your level of conditioning when you get started, you may do only 15 to 20 minutes per workout the first week or two. But that’s OK.

After you’ve built up your endurance and have a great baseline, then you can start to work out at a higher intensity. If you do a gradual build, you’ll be a lot less likely to end up with overuse injuries.

Also, make sure that you’re giving your body a sufficient recovery period between activities. Recovery time should always be individualized. Initially, a day or two in between exercise bouts should be adequate, but make sure to listen to your body.

Clues that you are not allowing enough recovery time may include continued muscle soreness and/or fatigue. If you try doing high intensity workouts seven days a week, the risk of breaking down and sustaining an injury is high. Your body needs time to recover and rebuild. That’s true even for elite athletes. They train hard, but they also take time to rest.

Yoga safety.

It’s interesting that yoga is generally perceived as this relaxing Zen kind of thing. But the thing about yoga is that it can involve getting into positions that your body hasn’t adapted to, and that’s when injuries may occur.

If you’re starting out and have never done yoga before, use common sense as you would with any type of exercise program. If your body doesn’t seem able to get into a pretzel position, that’s probably not a good position for you. If you feel pain, that’s a sign something’s wrong.

When you’re in a class setting, you may push yourself too hard because everyone around you is doing these positions, so you think you should be able to do them, too. You may feel a bit of embarrassment or self-consciousness. What you need to remember is that some of these people who make it look so easy have been doing yoga for a long time.

Just take a moment and ask yourself, “Does this seem like a position that is comfortable for my body? Since I’m just starting this, should I really be trying to put my foot behind my head?” If you ease into it and use common sense, you’ll be less likely to get hurt.


We all want to get in shape and lose weight yesterday, but as we get older, it takes more time for the body to adapt to changes. You have to think of exercise as a lifelong pursuit — it’s a marathon, not a sprint.


No pain, no gain? 

It’s true that you might experience a little muscle soreness from exercise and feel achy the next day. But pain is always an indicator that something is not right. If you have pain that’s not going away on its own, and if that pain is affecting your quality of life — including your ability to participate in physical activities — you should get it checked out.

When we say “no pain no gain,” we’re talking about Olympians and high level athletes who are really pushing hard to achieve and excel and be competitive. For everyday folk, “no pain no gain” shouldn’t be the mantra. You should feel like you worked out hard, but you shouldn’t feel like you have to sit down because you just killed yourself.

Most strains heal on their own within 4 to 6 weeks. But for instance, if you’re at the gym and you tweak your shoulder, and it’s still bothering you after a couple of weeks of rest and ice, make an appointment with an orthopedic specialist.

Don’t try to tough it out, and definitely don’t engage in activities that may make the injury worse. Of course, if you’re exercising and you feel something pop and have immediate pain or swelling, or if you hit your head, you should see a doctor right away.

The reality of DVD-based workout programs.

People assume that if there’s a hot new program like P90X that everyone — including celebrities — is trying, it must be the best program. But what’s right for one person isn’t necessarily right for another.

The reality is, I’ve seen a lot of P90X injuries in my practice. You’re given a DVD featuring someone who is supposedly an expert in their field, and you’re trying to mimic the exercises with no supervision. No one is telling you if you’re doing everything correctly; you’re just following a DVD.

But what you need to keep in mind is that there are some exercises people with certain conditions shouldn’t do. For example, if you have knee problems, you may not want to do exercises that are high impact or require you to twist your knees.

If you want to try a DVD-based program, I suggest not trying to do the whole DVD the first time. P90X is a 90-day program, and that’s a lot of exercise for the body to adapt to quickly, which is why it’s easy to injure yourself.

Start out doing 10 to 15 minutes at a lower intensity, and if an exercise doesn’t feel comfortable or you’re not sure about the proper way to do it, skip that particular exercise. Gradually increase the amount of time you spend on the workout. Once you’re able to do the whole DVD at a moderate level of intensity, then you can start to increase the intensity.

We all want to get in shape and lose weight yesterday, but as we get older, it takes more time for the body to adapt to changes. You have to think of exercise as a lifelong pursuit — it’s a marathon, not a sprint.

Creating a safe and successful exercise program

I would say the key is doing a variety of exercises — asking your muscles to do some different activities and working different muscles in your body, giving specific muscle groups breaks. Also, your program should include flexibility, strength and aerobic components. That’s extremely important.

If you’re stronger, you’ll have better endurance and be less likely to sustain injuries. People like to do activities at which they excel. I have patients who are very flexible and don’t need to work on their flexibility, but they are drawn to activities that require greater flexibility, like yoga, because they’re good at it. I also see people who are very good at aerobics, and that’s all they want to do; they don’t want to lift weights.

But they should be doing some weight training because fitness is really about balance: You need to have good flexibility, good strength and good aerobic conditioning to optimize your body’s overall condition.

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