Selection of Athletic Performance Training Shoe and Training NBA Players

In this segment Dr. Brian Cole of Midwest Orthopedics at Rush & Steve Kashul talk with Dalton Walker, Team Leader at Road Runner Sports of Chicago, about the science of determining the proper  athletic-performance shoe. Dalton explains how several factors including sport, gait and previous injury information will help determine the best fit and best outcome for the perfect shoe.

Also in this segment, Alex Perris, General Manager of RiverNorthCrossfit discusses his techniques as personal trainer and personal experiences training NBA players. Born and raised in New York City, Alex moved to Chicago in 2008 to become full time personal trainer to former Chicago Bulls star Joakim Noah.

He still works with NBA players and other Pro Basketball players. Alex served active duty in the United States Air Force and specializes in general strength and conditioning training and holds CrossFit Level 1 and Level 2 certification. He is available for 1 on 1 training.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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Power 5 conferences approve new measure to help bolster athletes’ mental health

A discussion with Natalie Graves, AM, LCSW about the Power 5 conferences to approve a new measure to help bolster athletes’ mental health. The legislation was one of several proposals voted on and approved by members of the ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, SEC and Pac-12 during the NCAA convention in Orlando.

The conferences can approve benefits for athletes that other Division I schools don’t have to implement due to the costs, but their changes often end up getting adopted by other leagues. The new legislation was spurred by a growing concern among schools about providing access to mental health resources, including counseling for athletes, coaches and athletics personnel.

Natalie also talks about the hurdles mental health professional face when attempting toHome connect with athletes to offer these supportive services and what this decision means for the athletes as well as mental health professionals. Natalie Graves is a licensed clinical social worker specializing in mental health and wellness for athletes.

Graves earned a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology from Chicago State University and a Master’s Degree from the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration.  Visit NatalieGraves.com.

Natalie Graves, AM, LCSW

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Strengthen Your Immune System with MCTs

There’s no way around it—germs surround us all the time.  Singular medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil contains medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) that act as natural antibiotics, which means they boost your immune system and fight off harmful bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa. While completely harmless to our bodies, MCFAs are lethal to some of the most notorious disease-inducing microorganisms in existence. 

They Don’t Stand a Chance

MCFAs may help protect you against:
  • Viruses: influenza, measles, mononucleosis
  • Bacteria: throat infections, pneumonia, earaches, rheumatic fever
  • Fungi, Yeast, and Parasites: ringworm, candida, thrush, giardiasis

Silent Assassins

Due to its chemical structure, MCFAs are drawn to and easily absorbed into most bacteria and viruses. MCFAs enter the lipid membrane and weaken it to the point that it eventually breaks open, expelling the microorganism’s insides and causing imminent death. White blood cells then quickly dispose of the terminated invader’s remains.

Super Fatty Acids

With 8 grams of caprylic acid and 6 grams of capric acid per serving, MCT Oil harbors antimicrobial capabilities, while also being free from any undesirable or unsafe side effects.

  • Capric Acid: one of the two most active antimicrobial fatty acids
  • Caprylic Acid: a potent natural yeast-fighting substance

Research continues to prove MCFAs as one of the best internal antimicrobial substances available without a doctor’s prescription.

MCT Lean MCT Oil 

Add MCT Lean MCT Oil to your daily health regimen to help fight off illness during any time of the year! One of my favorite sources of MCFAs is MCT Lean MCT Oil.  It is rapidly absorbed, easy to digest, and quickly converted to energy to maximize athletic performance. You can add MCT Lean MCT Oil to any drink, smoothie, or shake and use it in place of highly processed and easily oxidized conventional vegetable oils in salad dressings and sauces.
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Heart Health & Brain Health Go Hand-in-Hand

According to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease accounts for one of every four deaths in the United States. Many of the causes of heart disease are well-known, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes and obesity. Fortunately, there are also well-known lifestyle and behavior changes that can drastically reduce the risk of heart disease and include: smoking cessation, eating a healthy diet and exercising.

Despite the multitude of data showing that lifestyle behaviors can reduce the risk of heart disease and improve cardiovascular health, the Framingham Offspring Study recently reported that the percentage of people with ideal cardiovascular health (using the American Heart Association’s definition of Ideal Cardiovascular Health) has declined over the past 20 years.

Even in the absence of heart disease, the increasing percentage of Americans with less than ideal cardiovascular health translates to greater risk of heart disease and increased all-cause mortality. Because the heart and cardiovascular system are vital factors in overall health, other organ systems will be affected by less-than-ideal cardiovascular health. Importantly, adults having an ideal cardiovascular health score during the middle-aged years had a lower risk of cognitive decline and dementia. In addition, large-scale epidemiological studies have continued to show a strong correlation between cardiovascular health and brain health.

What is the link between cardiovascular health and brain health?

It is possible that heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease or dementia have common risk factors and that is why there are correlations between these conditions. However, the brain requires a large amount of blood flow, which needs to be precisely controlled to maintain optimal neuronal function. If a patient has a problem with the function of the heart or blood vessels, this could prevent adequate blood flow supply to the brain and eventually affect brain function and cognition. We know that patients with congestive heart failure have higher incidence of dementia. In heart failure patients, a reduced capacity of the left ventricle to pump blood (i.e. ejection fraction) is associated with poor cognitive test scores.

The function of the large vessels supplying blood flow to the brain are also important to overall brain health. A paper published almost 70 years ago first reported that patients with carotid occlusion (due to atherosclerosis) eventually progressed to dementia. This early case study was the first to suggest that mild hypoperfusion of the brain, due to large vessel stenosis, could lead to dementia.

Dysfunction in the heart (or pump) or the large blood vessels (or conduits) is associated with reduced cognitive function, but the small blood vessels in the brain that control the blood supply to neurons may also contribute to the link between cardiovascular health and brain health. This hypothesis was first proposed decades ago, based on evidence of disrupted microvessel structure in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients. Disruption in the microvessels can lead to hypoperfusion, disrupt the blood-brain-barrier or reduce the ability of the brain to utilize glucose. Collectively, an interruption at any segment of the blood delivery system (heart, large and small blood vessels) could impair the ability of the brain to function optimally.

physical activity recommendationsNow, for the good news: Because of the link between heart health and brain health, we know that lifestyle behaviors (like exercise!) can reduce the risk of developing heart disease AND developing cognitive decline. Older adults who are more physically active have better brain health compared with sedentary counterparts, suggesting a protective effect of exercise. And although more research is necessary to determine how exercise may promote healthy brain aging and what might be the optimal training program, using what we know about what works for heart health and following ACSM’s guidelines for physical activity is a great place to start. Remember to take care of our heart so that our heart can take care of our brain.

By: Jill Barnes, Ph.D., FACSM, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the Department of Kinesiology and has an affiliate faculty appointment in the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology in the School of Medicine and Public Health.

Related Article: Heart disease and brain health: Looking at the links

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