Resistance Training and Weight Loss

By Revolution Physical Therapy & Weight Loss

It has been suggested approximately 21% of the adult population participates in some sort of resistance training at least 2 days a week (Chevan, 2008). While the popularity of strength training has increased from the days of it’s seemingly “cult” fad (refer to Arnold’s Pumping Iron), there still lies a massive misconception that those trying to lose weight should NOT focus as much on resistance training.  With more secondary information available than ever on health and fitness, it is important to dig down into the primary scholarly sources and identify of the necessity of resistance training for 31% of the population whom is categorized as obese (projected 51% of the population will be obese by 2030).

Resistance training is defined as “any type of training in which the body must move in some direction against some type of force that resists that movement”  (Stoppani,  2006). Although this definition may appear basic at first sight, it is important to place emphasis on the “some type of force” piece. Too many of us relate resistance training to meatheads lifting heavy barbells and slamming weights around. We don’t take into account that your own body weight can be used for resistance in addition to using bands, free weights like dumbbells or medicine balls.There are multiple types of resistance that can provide the stimulus needed to achieve the desired result that will assist with weight loss.

Such results are achieved through neural stimulation which causes the muscle to contract and when the muscle shortens and lengthens it creates microtears. Over time, hypertrophy (muscle growth) occurs and muscle becomes thicker and can move more weight (McArdle, Katch & Katch, 2010). As an individual increases lean mass, they burn more fat during rest and aerobic exercise. Furthermore, as a result of resistance training, daily energy levels adrenaline and other hormones (testosterone) increase (McArdle, Katch & Katch, 2010).

In conclusion, resistance training for weight loss should consist of large muscle group exercises (push, squat, pull, trunk, etc.). Repetitions should be 15-20, 2-3 sets of each exercise, preferably performed in a circuit format. It is encouraged that beginners with resistance training utilize cross training, integrating bouts of aerobic activity (walking, bicycle, elliptical, etc.) between resistance circuits to avoid accumulation of lactic acid, which can result in delayed onset muscle soreness.

In practical terms, resistance training will increase lean mass that both assist with fat burn during your “cardio” days, and also keep the weight bearing joints strong to avoid injury during these “cardio” days. For assistance with understanding what your ideal resistance training circuit should look like based on your goals, please consult with one of our expert Exercise Physiologists at one of the seven convenient Chicago area Revolution locations.

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Do High Schools Need Athletic Trainers?; Understanding Elbow Injury; Advancements in Regenerative Medicine

Episode 17.02 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Katie Varnado from ATI Physical Therapy talks about the responsibilities and qualifications for Athletic Trainers, the difference between pro & non-pro team trainers, the importance of having High School Trainers and how to promote their use.

Katie Varnado is a certified and licensed athletic trainer who is passionate aboutKatie Varnado educating others about concussions, growth plate injuries in athletes, and the need for athletic trainers. In her role as Sports Medicine Director at ATI Physical Therapy, she oversees and provides guidance to the athletic trainers ATI provides to local high schools and colleges and ensures all athletes are receiving comprehensive care to return to sport as quickly and safely as possible.

Katie received her bachelor’s degree in kinesiology with a concentration in athletic training from Illinois State University.  She then went on to earn a prestigious year long sports medicine fellowship at the Steadman Hawkins Clinic in Vail, CO.  Katie has over fourteen years of experience working with both collegiate and high school athletics as well as working with physicians.


Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole discuss the various types of elbow injuries, causes and treatments. Dr. Cole describes the many new and interesting advancements in Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Therapy – the future of research and applications.

Related Posts: 

Improve your Understanding with 3D Animation on UCL Reconstruction (Tommy John Surgery)

Baseball and Softball: Pain After Pitching

Limiting Innings Pitched after Tommy John Surgery for MLB Players

Shoulder and Elbow Overuse Injuries

Overuse Injuries in Young Athletes


  

Meet the White Sox’s New Top Doc; Best Fats to Fuel your Workout

Episode 17.01 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Head team physician discusses his role keeping players on fieldDr. Nik Verma from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about his new role.  Hear how he and the other team physicians at Rush help keep Sox players healthy through the long baseball season.

  • Fellowship Director, Professor and Chief of Sports Medicine at Rush Universitynikhil verma Medical Center
  • Shoulder, Elbow and Knee Surgeon at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush
  • Head Team Physician for Chicago White Sox & Team Physician for Chicago Bulls and Nazareth Academy
  • Advanced Arthroscopic Reconstructive Techniques and Cartilage Restoration expertise
  • Voted Top 10-15% of Top Doctors in America® by U.S.NewWorld Report and Castle Connolly
  • Associate Editor of the Arthroscopy Journal and Editorial Board Member of Journal of Knee Surgery

Segment Two: Karen Malkin discusses the importance of MCTs- medium chain triglycerides: what are they and why are so many athletes adding them to their fitness plans. We tend to think carbohydrates give us the most energy.  How do MCTs compare to carbohydrates for fuel?

Best fats to cook with: Olive oil is known to be one of the healthiest fats for cardiovascular health.  Why shouldn’t we cook with olive oil? What are the best fats for high heat cooking? Can you cook with MCT oil?

Dr. Cole and Steve talk with Karen about the effectiveness of her 14 Day Transformation Program. Enter ESPN1000 in the Coupon Code box for a $100 discount.

Lifestyle and health are transformed though integrative health coaching. Karen practices a client-centered approach that acknowledges the interdependent roles of mind, body and spirit, and the innate healing capacity within each person, with an emphasis on self-care. Read more >>


  

When Healthy Becomes a Dangerous Obsession: Exploring Orthorexia

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We’re all familiar with the term ‘clean eating’ and know how important it is to eat the right foods in the right balance, no matter what our eating regime or diet plan is. But what if this turns into an obsession that becomes out of control? Experts are now seeing a distinct rise in the number of people suffering from a condition called Orthorexia Nervosa and with it, a fixation on so called ‘self-righteous eating’.

Exploring Orthorexia

Someone with this condition will become obsessed with the quality and purity of their food, they may avoid eating out, or anything that anyone else other than themselves has touched.

Whatever diet plan or eating regime you’re following, whether young or old, getting the right balance of nutrients is important in maintaining good health for everyone.

However, the Orthorexia sufferer will go the opposite way and become very restricted in the types of foods they will eat – often turning to a raw food diet, or one that restricts many forms of good quality proteins and micronutrients needed for healthy living. Jordan Younger, blogger and founder of ‘The Balanced Blonde’ was one such sufferer, whose vegan diet became so restrictive that her periods stopped and she became fearful of eating anything with protein in it, calling eggs her ‘fear food’.

The Orthorexic Diet

As we’ve seen, despite their obsession with health and clean living, the diet of the Orthorexic can be very lacking. The condition also spills out into other areas of life too, meaning that the sufferer may become very socially isolated, withdrawn or depressed. As their obsession increases, their physical health will suffer too, with women reporting that their periods cease, their hair starts to fall out and their teeth and nails become brittle and break easily.

Side Effects of the Condition

Sufferers may end up unaware or unable to identify any of their own physical feelings towards food:

  • They may not recognize when they are hungry
  • They may not recognize when they are full
  • If they fall off the wagon and eat anything they consider to be impure, their urges to become stricter in only eating pure food will grow stronger

Treatment

Treatment for more severe cases of the condition can involve inpatient therapy and counseling, combined with anti-anxiety medications and an eating plan that will slowly reintroduce missing nutrients, proteins and minerals into the diet that have previously been cut out. It’s a highly treatable illness that has a good recovery rate.

Contributed by Jess Walter, Freelance Writer

Lessons on Aging Well, From a 105-Year-Old Cyclist

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Robert Marchand, age 105, in Paris on Jan. 5, 2017, a day after setting a new one-hour cycling record.

At the age of 105, the French amateur cyclist and world-record holder Robert Marchand is more aerobically fit than most 50-year-olds — and appears to be getting even fitter as he ages, according to a revelatory new study of his physiology. The study, which appeared in December in the Journal of Applied Physiology, may help to rewrite scientific expectations of how our bodies age and what is possible for any of us athletically, no matter how old we are.

Many people first heard of Mr. Marchand last month, when he set a world record in one-hour cycling, an event in which someone rides as many miles as possible on an indoor track in 60 minutes. Mr. Marchand pedaled more than 14 miles, setting a global benchmark for cyclists age 105 and older. That classification had to be created specifically to accommodate him. No one his age previously had attempted the record.

Mr. Marchand, who was born in 1911, already owned the one-hour record for riders age 100 and older, which he had set in 2012. It was as he prepared for that ride that he came to the attention of Veronique Billat, a professor of exercise science at the University of Evry-Val d’Essonne in France. At her lab, Dr. Billat and her colleagues study and train many professional and recreational athletes.

She was particularly interested in Mr. Marchand’s workout program and whether altering it might augment his endurance and increase his speed. Conventional wisdom in exercise science suggests that it is very difficult to significantly add to aerobic fitness after middle age. In general, VO2max, a measure of how well our bodies can use oxygen and the most widely accepted scientific indicator of fitness, begins to decline after about age 50, even if we frequently exercise.

But Dr. Billat had found that if older athletes exercised intensely, they could increase their VO2 max. She had never tested this method on a centenarian, however. But Mr. Marchand was amenable. A diminutive 5 feet in height and weighing about 115 pounds, he said he had not exercised regularly during most of his working life as a truck driver, gardener, firefighter and lumberjack. But since his retirement, he had begun cycling most days of the week, either on an indoor trainer or the roads near his home in suburban Paris.

Almost all of this mileage was completed at a relatively leisurely pace. Dr. Billat upended that routine. But first, she and her colleagues brought Mr. Marchand into the university’s human performance lab. They tested his VO2 max, heart rate and other aspects of cardiorespiratory fitness. All were healthy and well above average for someone of his age. He also required no medications.

He then went out and set the one-hour world record for people 100 years and older, covering about 14 miles. Afterward, Dr. Billat had him begin a new training regimen. Under this program, about 80 percent of his weekly workouts were performed at an easy intensity, the equivalent of a 12 or less on a scale of 1 to 20, with 20 being almost unbearably strenuous according to Mr. Marchand’s judgment. He did not use a heart rate monitor.

The other 20 percent of his workouts were performed at a difficult intensity of 15 or above on the same scale. For these, he was instructed to increase his pedaling frequency to between 70 and 90 revolutions per minute, compared to about 60 r.p.m. during the easy rides. (A cycling computer supplied this information.) The rides rarely lasted more than an hour. Mr. Marchand followed this program for two years. Then he attempted to best his own one-hour track world record.

First, however, Dr. Billat and her colleagues remeasured all of the physiological markers they had tested two years before. Mr. Marchand’s VO2 max was now about 13 percent higher than it had been before, she found, and comparable to the aerobic capacity of a healthy, average 50-year-old. He also had added to his pedaling power, increasing that measure by nearly 40 percent.

Unsurprisingly, his cycling performance subsequently also improved considerably. During his ensuing world record attempt, he pedaled for almost 17 miles, about three miles farther than he had covered during his first, record-setting ride. He was 103 years old.

These data strongly suggest that “we can improve VO2 max and performance at every age,” Dr. Billat says. There are caveats, though. Mr. Marchand may be sui generis, with some lucky constellation of genes that have allowed him to live past 100 without debilities and to respond to training as robustly he does.

So his anecdotal success cannot tell us whether an 80/20 mix of easy and intense workouts is necessarily ideal or even advisable for the rest of us as we age. (Please consult your doctor before beginning or changing an exercise routine.) Lifestyle may also matter. Mr. Marchand is “very optimistic and sociable,” Dr. Billat says, “with many friends,” and numerous studies suggest that strong social ties are linked to a longer life.

His diet is also simple, focusing on yogurt, soup, cheese, chicken and a glass of red wine at dinner. But for those of us who hope to age well, his example is inspiring and, Dr. Billat says, still incomplete. Disappointed with last month’s record-setting ride, he believes that he can improve his mileage, she says, and may try again, perhaps when he is 106.

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