Why Diets Don’t Work

By Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling 

Put Down Your Fork!

You can’t turn on the TV, drive down the road or go to a party without being confronted with America’s hottest obsession: weight. Diets are a billion-dollar industry; companies spend millions and millions luring you to try the latest diet (low carb, high protein, low fat, no fat, you name it) with promises that this will (finally!) be the solution to a thinner body. Advertising efforts also deeply affect our children, who develop distorted body images and are often on diets as early as nine or ten years of age.iStock_000004541421Small

Our culture touts diet pills, celebrity workouts, convenience foods and trendy diets to help us achieve our desired weight, but these quick-fix solutions have backfired. America’s populace has reached its highest weight in history. About half of Americans are overweight; one-third are obese. Diets steer us away from our common sense and dip deeply into our pocketbooks while eliciting few, if any, lasting results. Why?

  • Diets don’t work because each person is unique, with different needs based on gender, age, ancestry and lifestyle; how could one diet be right for everyone?
  • Diets don’t work because they are extreme solutions. As in physics, if a pendulum swings to one extreme, it has to swing equally to the other. A diet might work for a short amount of time, but research shows that almost all diets result in a 10-pound gain once off the diet.
  • Diets don’t work because they are too restrictive. People who fail on diet plans are not flawed or weak. Diets by nature require discipline and restriction at levels that are unsustainable by a healthy human body.
  • Diets don’t work because most people are disconnected from why they gain weight and see diet as the only culprit. For example, ignoring or discounting emotions is often the first thing to cause weight imbalances.

In our fast-paced world, we have lost sight of many aspects of life that truly nourish and balance our bodies, such as slowing down, eating a home-cooked meal and spending quality time with loving people. Eating consciously and making simple lifestyle changes will create positive results and release you from the endless cycle of dieting. Given half a chance, your body will balance out by itself, but this is only possible by getting out of the diet mentality and listening to what you truly need.

Imagine taking all of the outward energy you expend on diets, fads and gimmicks and turning it inward, so that you can listen to your heart and inner wisdom. There is no such thing as a quick fix; you already have everything you need within you. With careful thought and loving reflection, you can feed yourself in a nourishing way. Working with your body rather than against it will bring you increased energy, stabilized weight and sustainable health.

Pre & Post Workout Supplements; Chicago Sports Summit; Replacing Opiods with Physical Therapy

Episode 17.23  Replay

Segment One (01:31): Personal Trainer & Sports Nutritionist, Alex True Strength T-ShirtCarneirofrom Optimum Nutrition helps us understand how to sort out all the information available on supplements to select the best for our training program; the role of protein supplements, caffeine, branched-chain amino acid and resveritrol for building muscle, fueling our workout and recovery.

As an international leading fitness authority, Alexandre Carneiro has spent the last decade educating others on the meaning of fitness, health, and connecting those two things with a healthy mind. With a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology and nutrition, along with positive, motivating philosophies, Carneiro has helped people all over the world achieve their fitness goals. From celebrities to military personal and everyday people, Alexandre has worked and helps expand his philosophy that fitness only needs one thing; a changing mindset.


Segment Two (13:33): Dr. Cole announces the 2nd Annual Chicago Sports Summit, a half-day event featuring some of Chicago’s heaviest hitters. Participants speak about how sports and after school activities empower youth to engage in positive behavior to help reduce Chicago’s violence.

Executives also discuss how they use sports marketing and celebrities to grow their business. Attendees will learn about new developments in sports science and how these advances impact an athlete’s endurance, performance and injury prevention.


Segment Three (20:08): Dr. Wajde  Dabah from Pain Therapy Associates and Dr. Brian Cole discuss the use of physical therapy, as provided by ATI Physical Therapy, for an alternative to Opiods in managing pain.

Related Article

Wajde Dabah, MD, is a board-certified anesthesiologist and pain medicine specialist. He has special expertise in spinal cord stimulation as well as treatment of complex regional pain syndrome, musculoskeletal pain and peripheral neuropathy.

Dr. Dabah believes that chronic pain is a disease no different than hypertension or diabetes and that with time, commitment and partnership with his patients, they will take back control of their lives and overcome their chronic pain.

Dr. Dabah is also the medical director for transcranial magnetic stimulation, innovative technology for the treatment of depression.

Health Coaching vs Nutritionist; Helmet Safety

Episode 17.22 

Segment One (01:56): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about customizing your diet to your own physiology and biology. With all the options-resources available today and information overload, Karen helps to simplify decisions on “Whats Right for Me”.

For Special Savings with Karen please visit:

14daytransformation.com and use the Coupon Code ESPN1000


Segment Two (16:03): Samantha Cochran from Athletico Physical Therapy discusses helmet safety when participating in various sports, proper use and fitting of helmets. While all leagues and teams require helmets, many coaches, players and parents don’t know exactly how to choose a helmet that will provide the right protection. Athletico has developed a step-by-step guide to educate parents, athletes and coaches on selecting and wearing helmets.

Proper Fitting Tips for Protective Equipment

  • Always follow manufacturer’s guidelines when fitting any helmet2017 national athletic training month
  • Hair should be wet when fitting any helmet
  • Each part of the helmet serves a purpose
  • Attention to detail and wearing every helmet properly ensures maximum protection
  • Never cut corners
  • Replace any helmet that has been damaged
  • Look for the NOCSAE seal of approval
  • Comfort is key
  • If your helmet is fitted properly but not comfortable, explore other options

Samantha Cochran is an athletic trainer with Athletico Physical Therapy at Malcolm X College within the City Colleges of Chicago. She received her Master of Science degree with a concentration in Kinesiology in 2014 from Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi. In her time at TAMUCC she served as a graduate assistant athletic trainer for Islanders’ athletics from 2012-2014.

Helmet Fitting Tips from Athletico Physical Therapy

Will your diet start in the new year? Try the ‘non-diet diet’

It's time to start eating mindfully

For the new year, if you’ve been struggling with your weight, you might turn to a new diet for help with shedding pounds.

So what will it be in 2018? Weight Watchers? Paleo? Jenny Craig? Low-carb?
Some nutritionists say rather than jumping on the latest diet bandwagon or trend, it’s time to consider embracing a “non-diet diet” — basically a set of guiding principles that can help you lose weight and keep it off for good.
“A non-diet diet is for anyone who has ever said ‘The diet starts Monday,’ ” said Brooke Alpert, a registered dietitian and author of “The Diet Detox: Why Your Diet is Making You Fat and What to Do About It.” “It’s a lifestyle approach to healthy eating.”
The problem with most diets, according to Alpert, is that they have an “expiration date.”
“Whether it’s one day, 10 days, 30 days or 45 days — with an end date, you are setting yourself up for failure and for the never-ending yo-yo dieting cycle,” she said.
For example, if you’ve been forbidden from eating bread, “even a stale bread basket looks amazing,” said Alpert. And once you’ve been deprived of the foods you love, you are more susceptible to binging and eventually regaining the weight you’ve lost — plus a few pounds.
“When you put food on a pedestal, and only focus on willpower to avoid your favorite foods, you create an unhealthy relationship with food and are more likely to overeat,” said Alpert.
What’s more important for success, experts say, is avoiding strict food rules — something that is typical of many diets.
“A sustainable eating plan that is balanced and is not restrictive is easier to adhere to in the long run,” agreed Kelly Pritchett, a registered dietitian and spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Also, most diets that restrict or eliminate foods are also missing important nutrients and this can result in nutrient deficiencies.”

The non-diet dietYo-yo dieting dangerous for women's hearts, study says

Since deprivation sets us up for diet failure, one of the most important aspects of a “non-diet diet” is intentional indulgences — that is, planned splurges without guilt attached.
“Guilt makes you fat,” said Alpert. Feeling guilty about your food choices causes you to make more poor food choices, and so it becomes a cyclical pattern, according to Alpert. “There is a time and a place for French fries and pizza and a piece of cake.”
The key, however, is planning ahead. For example, if you’re going out for dinner, and you know the restaurant has an amazing chocolate cake, then you can allow some room for it by cutting back on your starches during the day. But the idea is to fully enjoy your treat while you eat it. “It’s about eating intentionally … and saying ‘I’m going to have that piece of cake and not feel bad about it.’ “
Allowing yourself a small indulgence even on a daily basis can be helpful for weight management, according to Pritchett. “You have to figure out what works for you. I like two daily dark chocolate squares because it’s typically satisfying,” she said.