If These Walls could Talk-Chicago Bears; The Return of Zach LaVine; Understanding Probiotics

Episode 17.31 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:27):  Former Chicago Bear Otis Wilson talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about how the game has changed from 1985 and about his new book, If These Walls Could Talk: Chicago Bears: Stories from the Chicago Bears Sideline, Locker Room, and Press Box. Led by stars like Walter Payton, Jim McMahon, Mike Singletary, William “Refrigerator” Perry, head coach Mike Ditka, and defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan, the Chicago Bears in the 1980s were an NFL powerhouse.

As anyone who’s seen “The Super Bowl Shuffle” surely knows, they were also an unforgettable group of characters. Otis Wilson, the Bears starting outside linebacker, was right in the center of the action, and in this book, Wilson provides a closer look at the great moments and personalities that made this era legendary. Readers will meet the players, coaches, and management and share in their moments of triumph and defeat. Be a fly on the wall as Wilson recounts stories from those days in Chicago, including the 1985 Super Bowl-winning season. If These Walls Could Talk: Chicago Bears will make fans a part of the team’s storied history.


Segment Two (12:58): Dr. Cole and Steve discuss the return of Zach LaVine and the rehab process after ACL reconstruction. Fred Hoiberg confirmed that the Bulls will be bringing Zach LaVine (knee) along slowly once he’s cleared for contact.Zach LaVine #8 of the Chicago Bulls poses for a portrait during the 2017-18 NBA Media Day on September 25, 2017 at the United Center in Chicago, Illinois.

“We’ll still take things slow,’’ Hoiberg said. “We won’t throw him out for an hour scrimmage the first day he gets cleared for contact. It will be a gradual process. But he’s doing great, doing everything he’s supposed to do.’’
LaVine is on track to be cleared for contact within the next few weeks, but the Bulls will be taking an extremely cautious approach with his return, so it could be a while until he’s fully up to speed working without restrictions.

Segment Three (19:41): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling decribes probiotics, why and when they should be used.

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts that are good for your health, especially your digestive system. We usually think of bacteria as something that causes diseases. But your body is full of bacteria, both good and bad. Probiotics are often called “good” or “helpful” bacteria because they help keep your gut healthy.

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Good bacteria are naturally found in your body. You can find probiotics in some foods and supplements.

It’s only been since about the mid-1990s that people have wanted to know more about probiotics and their health benefits. Doctors often suggest them to help with digestive problems. And because of their newfound fame, you can find them in everything from yogurt to chocolate.

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You Are What You Eat: Why Your Diet Matters to Your Brain

A growing body of scientific evidence supports the relationship between diet and long-term cognitive health. This third article in a four part series on take aways that you can benefit from today, out of the annual AAIC meeting will highlight the findings on diet and cognition. The prior two posts explored the relationship between sleep and cognition and exercise and your brain health and next week we will explore how socialization (the face to face kind not the Facebook kind) is fundamental to long term cognitive health.

You are what you eat

At the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2017 last week in London, results from four large population-based studies suggested a link between healthy eating practices and better cognition when you’re older. I listened as my fellow neuroscientists and behavioral psychologists discussed how certain lifestyle and dietary choices could have a significant impact on long-term health. It seems like common sense, but most people choose to delay healthy eating until it’s too late.

It’s hard to make changes when you’re young, vibrant and healthy. We don’t want to think about how our actions and dietary choices today will impact our health 30 years down the road. And many people think that if they stay slim while eating a poor diet they will not face the health consequences of those poor nutrition choices, but they are wrong and in medicine we have a term for such people, TOFI.

In recent years, the link between diet and cognition has grown and attracted significant attention from more than clinical psychologists and neuroscientists. Different diets made their way into the media and Hollywood spotlight- Paleo, Atkins, the South Beach diet, and the recent Whole 30 diet craze– all of which offer shiny promises to improve your mind and body.

But do they really?

While these Hollywood diets go in and out of fashion, the Mediterranean Diet — comprised of eating mostly plants (vegetables, fruit, beans) – has maintained its golden reputation, backed by decades of scientific research. Studies have again and again shown that this diet protects against obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Now evidence also suggests that this diet could lessen the risk for cognitive decline and lifetime risk of dementia.

The Journal of Neurology recently published a study that confirmed the easy-to-follow Mediterranean diet can have lasting benefits for brain health. Another study of over 6000 older adults showed a 30-35% lower risk of memory impairment when sticking to a Mediterranean-based diet. CNN recently reported that people who closely adhered to a diet similar to the Mediterranean diet saw a 53% lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

What exactly is the Mediterranean diet?

The Mediterranean diet is mostly plant-based, with an emphasis on limiting saturated fat. This diet suggests a high intake of fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, fish, and unsaturated fatty acids such as olive oil and avocado. It also encourages a moderate intake of dairy, wine, and poultry. Finally, it recommends a low intake of red meats and sweets.

Usually the term ‘diet’ conjures up images of bland, boring, unsatisfying food. Part of the Mediterranean Diet’s success is that it’s focused on hearty, tasty food, so it can easily become a lifestyle change rather than a chore.

Unlike many fad diets, the Mediterranean diet does not advocate for a large restriction of carbohydrates. The guidelines instead suggest that healthy carbohydrates be consumed—those found in vegetables and whole grains. This gives another benefit to the Mediterranean diet: it’s high in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds that combat the oxidative processes that occur within the aging brain. Oxidative damage is a common attribute in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. The main components of the Mediterranean diet (e.g. fruits, vegetables, wine, olive oil) provide high levels of antioxidants that slow and/or prevent this damage.

The evidence speaks for itself

As someone clinically trained in healthcare, I believe in hard evidence and facts. It’s hard to ignore the growing body of literature that the modern western diet may account for the rise we see in many disease conditions from Alzheimer’s to Diabetes to even (the latest studies suggest) Depression and Anxiety. I began eating a Mediterranean Diet in my late 20s and my physician tells me that at 46 I have the “numbers of a 30 year old” at my annual physical.

I know this choice may not be for everyone, but I strongly encourage each of you to consider your daily food choices and know that your actions today could affect your brain health down the road.

Billy Garrett Jr. thrives in defiance of Sickle Cell Disease; Transform your Health with the Toxin Take-down Course

Episode 17.29 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:33): Billy Garrett Jr. talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about his Sickle Cell condition, how he trains and has played at the highest level at DePaul University and now currently with the NY Knicks G League. The 6-foot-5 Chicago native has the “SC” form of sickle cell disease, statistically milder than the “SS” form. It is different from sickle cell trait, which can cause muscle breakdown during intense exercise.

Billy Garrett Jr.

Garrett Jr.’s condition, in short: Red blood cells mutate into a “sickle” shape to clog vessels and limit blood flow. This can cause extreme pain emanating from joints or, worse, damage to organs. Each of these episodes is called a crisis. Triggers include stress, a lack of rest, cold temperatures (that constrict blood vessels) and dehydration — all of which describe the daily working conditions of an athlete playing high-level basketball.


Segment Two (15:20): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks about the various program levels and resources available to improve your health, your life and improve the environment.

The 14 Day Transformation Program, the Foundation Program, Master Your Metabolism Program and announcing her new Toxic Takedown Course to be launched in October.

The new program educates you on how to reduce the toxic load in your food and environment and eliminate damage from free radicals. Karen encourages all of us to visit ewg.org which provides a wealth of resources to help us live better and protect the environment.

The Environmental Working Group’s mission is to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. With breakthrough research and education, we drive consumer choice and civic action.