About McKenzie Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy

Thomas J. Lotus, DC, FACO, Cert.MDT from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discusses the difference between traditional chiropractic care and The McKenzie Method® of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy®.

Dr. Thomas J. Lotus received his doctorate in 2003 as a graduate of National University of Health Sciences where he specialized in rehabilitation and non-surgical orthopedics.  He is part-time faculty for the Lincoln School of Post-Professional Education. Dr. Lotus currently teaches courses around the country and internationally covering classification, non-surgical orthopedics, rehabilitation, biomechanics and pain.tom_lotus

Dr. Lotus holds fellowship status as a board certified chiropractic orthopedist (DACO) and sits on the Board of Directors.  He is also a candidate for diplomat status within the American Chiropractic Rehabilitation Board .

Unique to his professional peers, Dr. Lotus is part of the small percent of chiropractors in the world who are fully credentialed in McKenzie Therapy: Mechanical Diagnosis & Therapy and was a 2013 keynote speaker at their symposium for the North Americas.

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Ask the Doctor!

This regular segment of ‘Ask the Doctor’ addresses questions sent in by Sports Medicine Weekly followers. In this segment we have Dr. Gregory Nicholson from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, addressing questions about:

  • balancing a busy lifestyle with a efficient workout routine
  • issues for youth athletes and meniscus repairs

A graduate from Indiana University School of Medicine, Dr. Nicholson completed his internship and orthopedic residency at University Hospital of Cleveland and completed a fellowship in shoulder and elbow surgery at the New York Orthopaedic Hospital at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City.gregory nicholson md

Dr. Nicholson is involved in the design of an advanced shoulder replacement system. He is a consultant to differing orthopedic companies and has designed instruments and implants for shoulder and elbow surgery. He is the principal investigator for funded studies on rotator cuff repair augmentation, and shoulder arthroplasty.

If you have a question to be addressed on an upcoming show, please click here to submit your question.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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Ask the Doctor!

This regular segment of ‘Ask the Doctor’ addresses questions sent in by Sports Medicine Weekly followers. In this segment we have Dr. Gregory Nicholson from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, addressing questions about followup on unsuccessful shoulder surgery and meniscus repairs on youth athletes.

Dr. Nicholson specializes in shoulder and elbow surgery, utilizing state-of-the-art arthroscopic and open surgical techniques to treat sports-related, traumatic, arthritic, and occupational conditions of the shoulder and elbow.

A graduate from Indiana University School of Medicine, Dr. Nicholson completed his internship and orthopedic residency at University Hospital of Cleveland and completed a fellowship in shoulder and elbow surgery at the New York Orthopaedic Hospital at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. gregory nicholson md

Dr. Nicholson is involved in the design of an advanced shoulder replacement system. He is a consultant to differing orthopedic companies and has designed instruments and implants for shoulder and elbow surgery. He is the principal investigator for funded studies on rotator cuff repair augmentation, and shoulder arthroplasty.

If you have a question to be addressed on an upcoming show, please click here to submit your question.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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How often do Sports Injuries Occur?

Dr. Gregory Nicholson from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush and Steve Kashul discuss an article concerning how often sports injuries occur. Dr. Nicholson specializes in shoulder and elbow surgery, utilizing state-of-the-art arthroscopic and open surgical techniques to treat sports-related, traumatic, arthritic, and occupational conditions of the shoulder and elbow.

gregory nicholson md

A graduate from Indiana University School of Medicine, Dr. Nicholson completed his internship and orthopedic residency at University Hospital of Cleveland and completed a fellowship in shoulder and elbow surgery at the New York Orthopaedic Hospital at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. More>>

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), participation in organized sports is on the rise. Nearly 30 million children and adolescents participate in youth sports in the United States. This increase in play has led to some other startling statistics about injuries among America’s young athletes:

  • High school athletes account for an estimated 2 million injuries and 500,000 doctor visits and 30,000 hospitalizations each year.
  • More than 3.5 million kids under age 14 receive medical treatment for sports injuries each year.
  • Children ages 5 to 14 account for nearly 40 percent of all sports-related injuries treated in hospitals. On average the rate and severity of injury increases with a child’s age.
  • Overuse injuries are responsible for nearly half of all sports injuries to middle and high school students.
  • Although 62 percent of organized sports-related injuries occur during practice, one-third of parents do not have their children take the same safety precautions at practice that they would during a game.
  • Twenty percent of children ages 8 to 12 and 45 percent of those ages 13 to 14 will have arm pain during a single youth baseball season.
  • Injuries associated with participation in sports and recreational activities account for 21 percent of all traumatic brain injuries among children in the United States.
  • According to the CDC, more than half of all sports injuries in children are preventable.
  • By age 13, 70 percent of kids drop out of youth sports. The top three reasons: adults, coaches and parents.
  • Among athletes ages 5 to 14, 28 percent of percent of football players, 25 percent of baseball players, 22 percent of soccer players, 15 percent of basketball players, and 12 percent of softball players were injured while playing their respective sports.
  • Since 2000 there has been a fivefold increase in the number of serious shoulder and elbow injuries among youth baseball and softball players.

From https://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/

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