Tracking Patient Outcomes; Tips for the Aging Athlete; Active Father finds Healing after Tissue Transplant

Episode 17.21

Segment One (01:20): Dr. Nikhil Verma from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discusses the importance of tracking patient outcomes: value based care; measuring quality ofnikhil verma care vs cost; which techniques work best based on patient outcomes; how the outcomes meet specific conditions and expectations.

Dr. Verma is a Professor and Director, Division of Sports Medicine, Fellowship Director, Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedics, Rush University Medical Center, Team Physician, Chicago White Sox/Chicago Bulls.

Dr. Verma specializes in treatment of the shoulder, elbow and knee with an emphasis on advanced arthroscopic reconstructive techniques of the shoulder, shoulder replacement, knee ligament reconstruction and articular cartilage reconstruction and meniscal transplantation.

Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush is widely recognized as the regional leader in comprehensive orthopedic services. 

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Segment Two (11:23): Dr. Leython Williams from Athletico Physical Threrapy discusses the benefits of accepting and adjusting to the inevitability of aging. Aging gracefully is linked to healthy diet, regular exercise and good genes.

Athletes both professional and amateur often refuse to let age slow them down. However, even the most elite athletes are not immune to aging; rebuilding bone and gaining muscle; trading intensity for duration; cooling down for gradual decrease in intensity.

Dr. Williams is a Doctor of Physical Therapy and facility manager for Athletico Physical Therapy at their Lincolnshire facility. He is a former Division 1 athlete that infuses his experience as an elite athlete into his evidence-based practice in the outpatient orthopedic setting.

Dr. Williams is an expert in musculoskeletal function and rehabilitation as he seeks to restore functionality and decrease pain. His mission aligns with Athletico is providing progressive outpatient therapy through personalized care that emphasizes patient education and injury prevention.

Schedule a Complimentary Injury Screen


Segment Three (21:07): Cartilage transplant Phil Pizzano is an active husband, father and former Division I soccer player discusses his tissue transplant with Steve and Dr. Cole.

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In 2012, he began to suffer from debilitating knee pain. After enduring years of pain and surgery, he met with a doctor who told him he was a candidate for an osteochondral allograft transplant. In the two and a half years since that surgery, he’s been able to keep up with his two children and even picked up CrossFit.

Learn More at Allograft Possibilities

Golf: Return to Play after Surgery, Winter Conditioning & New Teaching Technology; Avoiding Winter Sports Injuries

Episode 17.34 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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James StandhardtSegment One (01:30): Dr. Nik Verma sitting in for Dr. Cole and Steve speak with James Standhardt from GOLFTEC about returning to play after surgery, winter conditioning, importance of club fitting and new technology in golf instruction. James has taught for more than 14 years and has given over 19,000 lessons with GOLFTEC. Six time “Outstanding Achievement in Instruction” winner.


Segment Two (16:05): Dr. Julia Bruene from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about how to avoid skiing and other winter sports injuries.

Dr. Julia Bruene is a sports medicine physician with special interests in concussion management, care of female athletes, care of combat athletes/mixed martial arts, and special needs athletes.

In 2006, Dr. Bruene graduated magna cum laude earning her bachelor’s degree in health planning and administration, with a minor in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She went on to complete her medical degree at Rush University Medical College, Chicago, IL graduating in the top 20 percent of her class. Dr. Bruene served as chief resident in the Advocate Lutheran General Hospital Family Medicine Residency Program, Park Ridge, IL. She then completed a fellowship in primary care sports medicine at Rush University Medical Center.

A Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioner and recreational runner, Dr. Bruene understands how vital physical well-being is to athletes. Dedicated to keeping fellow sports enthusiasts healthy, Dr. Bruene volunteers to provide medical coverage for Chicago-area sporting events such as the Chicago Style Gymnastics Meet and Bank of America Chicago Marathon. She has also participated in team coverage for local area high school, college, and professional teams, and is a team physician for the Chicago White Sox.

The Olympic Experience with Dara Torres; Clinical Trials & Research; Benefits of Coconut Water

Episode 17.33 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:40): Dr. Nik Verma sits in for Dr. Brian Cole, with Steve Kashul and talks with Dara Torres5 Time Olympian Swimmer/12 time Medalist. Dara talks about her competition experience and training routines over the years.  

Dara Torres is arguably the fastest female swimmer in America. She entered her first international swimming competition at age 14 and competed in her first Olympic Games a few years later in 1984.

At the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008, Dara became the oldest swimmer to compete in the Olympic Games. When she took three silver medals home – including the infamous heartbreaking 50-meter freestyle race where she missed the Gold by 1/100th of a second – America loved her all the more for her astonishing achievement and her good-natured acceptance of the results.

In total, Dara has competed in five Olympic Games and has won 12 medals in her entire Olympic career. Her impressive performance in Beijing and her attempt at the 2012 London Olympic Games has inspired many older athletes to consider re-entering competition.

Career Highlights

  • 2009 U.S. Nationals Gold Medalist in 50m Freestyle
  • 2009 World Championships (8th 50m Freestyle, 4th 4×100 Freestyle)
  • Five-Time Olympian; 12-Time Medalist
  • First U.S. swimmer to compete in 5 Olympics
  • U.S. Record Holder in 50m Freestyle
  • Broadcast: NBC, ABC, NBC, ESPN & more.

Segment Two (13:18): Dr. Nik Verma talks with Steve about the importance of clinical trials and research, translational research, current studies in biologics and the use of stem cells. Currently, Dr. Verma maintains an active clinical practice performing over 500 procedures per year. He is Director of the Division of Sports Medicine and Director of the Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. In addition, he serves as a team physician for the Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls, and Nazareth Academy.nikhil verma

In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Verma is actively involved in orthopedic research with interests in basic science, biomechanics and clinical outcomes, and has recently received funding for his work from Major League Baseball.

He has authored multiple peer-reviewed manuscripts in major orthopedic and sports medicine journals, numerous book chapters, and routinely serves as teaching faculty for orthopedic courses on advanced surgical techniques. He frequently serves as an invited speaker or guest surgeon for national and international orthopedic sports medicine meetings. 


Segment Three (19:07): Scott Sandler, President & CEO of COCO5 talks about the benefits of coconut water for professional athletes and weekend warriors & how COCO5 Coconut Water differs from other hydration products.

GREAT TASTING, NATURAL HYDRATION

COCO5 combines the powerful hydrating properties of young coconut water with all natural flavors to create a hydration beverage perfect for any time of day or night. Clean, refreshing and brilliantly delicious. Nothing artificial. Ever.

COCO5 replenishes the body with all 5 essential electrolytes your body needs. Magnesium, Sodium, Potassium, Chloride and Calcium.

  1. Eliminate chemical additives, dyes and high fructose corn syrup found in leading fluid replacement beverages. 
  2. Replace fluids lost through sweat.
  3. Restore electrolytes depleted during exercise.
  4. Reduce cramping and gastric distress often experienced with conventional sports drinks.
  • All Natural ingredients
  • Benefits come from coconut water, not artificially added ingredients or chemicals
  • Unlike other hydration drinks, the electrolytes in COCO5 are naturally occurring (sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chloride and small amounts of other nutrients)
  • Colors and flavors are from natural fruits and vegetables
  • No artificial dyes (i.e., Red40, Bluel, Yellow5)
  • No artificial sweeteners. Stevia (Rebiana) is used as a sweetener from a plant (no artificial sweeteners such as Sucralose, Aspartame or Acesulfame potassium as found in other hydration drinks)
  • Maximum absorption due to the balance of carbohydrates and electrolytes

Platform Tennis Injuries; Understanding Cryotherapy; Muscle Activation Techniques

Episode 17.32 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:30): Dr. Leda Ghannad from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discusses platform tennis injuries.IMG_0854.JPG

The first-ever national study of platform (paddle) tennis injuries revealed 66 percent of paddle tennis players say they sustained an injury from playing the game. The study also found that of the platform tennis players reporting an injury, more than half sustained two or more.

The most common conditions reported were injuries to the shin/calf (21%), knee (16%), elbow (16%), ankle (13%) and shoulder (10%). Sixty percent of the injuries were caused by overuse and 40 percent were due to an incident that occurred during play. The study, which involved an online survey of American Platform Tennis Association players nationwide, was coordinated by Dr. Leda Ghannad, a sports medicine physician at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, with approval from the internal review board at Rush University Medical Center. More than 1,000 players responded to the survey.

“We knew it was a high-injury sport based on the number of paddle patients we treat,” admits Dr. Ghannad. “But until now, there wasn’t any research that proved this. Paddle tennis requires a mixture of speed, agility and quick bursts of energy, which makes athletes more susceptible to getting hurt. Many players are also middle-aged ‘weekend warriors’ who don’t strengthen or stretch their muscles and ligaments in between games or practices.”

Paddle tennis is similar to tennis but is played outside in the winter on a small, elevated court surrounded by a screen. Courts are heated from underneath to clear snow and ice. Most participants are between the ages of 40 and 65.


Segment Two (10:25): What is Cryotherapy? Uses and application of ice vs heat by Matt Gauthier from Athletico Physical Therapy

The most long-standing and common form of “cryotherapy” is the application of ice or cold packs to injuries to cause blood vessels to constrict, which reduces blood flow and alleviates pain, swelling and inflammation. While there is still some debate over the longer-term effects on healing, such localized (i.e., applied to specific part of the body) “cryotherapy” certainly seems to have clear short-term benefits and has long been standard practice among health professionals. 

Unlike localized cryotherapy, whole body cryotherapy consists of exposing the entire body to very low (subzero) temperatures, sometimes below -200 degrees Fahrenheit, for a few minutes (typically between 2 and 4 minutes). Often, the person will stand in a tank or closet-like device, wear minimal clothing and be bathed in liquid nitrogen or refrigerated cold air…like taking the ultimate cold shower.


Segment Three (21:42): Skip Chapman from Fitness Formula Club discusses Muscle Activation Techniques. In recent years, a revolutionary new process has evolved for identifying and correcting muscular imbalances in the body known as Muscle Activation Techniques™ (MAT). This exciting and unique system can dramatically improve joint stability, increase range of motion, reduce subjective complaints, and enhance overall function and performance for individuals of all ages and present abilities.

MAT™ looks at muscle tightness as a form of protection in the body. Weak or inhibited muscles can create the need for other muscles to tighten up in order to help stabilize the joints. MAT™ gets to the root of the complaint or injury by addressing muscle weakness rather than muscle tightness. This helps to restore normal body alignment, thereby, improving performance and decreasing subjective complaints.

If you are an athlete, fitness enthusiast, or rehabilitation patient who is:

  • Seriously concerned about joint health as you ageFitness Formula Clubs
  • Hesitant to exercise as hard as you want due to chronic injury and pain
  • Confused about how best to stop joint pain when working out
  • Worried about chronic aches and pains post workout
  • Stiff and inflexible and stretching is not working
  • Tired of nagging injuries preventing your fitness progress