Dr. Kathleen Weber Featured on BullsTV Pre-Game Live

Dr. Kathleen Weber, sports medicine primary care physician and team physician for theMORGif-180x150-link Chicago Bulls joined BullsTV host Steve Kashul during Bulls Pre-Game Live on December 19th, 2016. Dr. Weber discussed the NBA’s new Concussion Protocol and the efforts being made to protect all players from returning too soon to the court.

Kashul and Dr. Weber also talked about how the physicians at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush all work together in treating the Chicago Bulls players.

 

Ankle Injuries; Bone Bruises; Men’s Health

Episode 16.33 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Dr. Simon Lee from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discusses sprains, dr-simon-leeachilles and other foot and ankle injuries; bracing vs taping. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS), 25 percent of all injuries from sports are to the foot and ankle. Athletes who play certain sports with sudden foot movements, such as hockey, basketball, football and tennis, are at a greater risk of ankle injuries. However, The Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine reports that the sports that cause the most ankle injuries are boys’ and girls’ basketball and girls’ gymnastics.

For dancers, the rate of ankle injuries is even higher than for those who play sports. A full 50 percent of dancers’ injuries are to the foot or ankle. Dancers’ feet and ankles endure twists, turns and heavy load during practices and performances. In addition, they are under pressure to stay thin and may eat too few nutrients, exacerbating injuries by weakening their bones and muscles. A minor injury to the ankle will leave athletes or dancers sidelined for at least two weeks. However, a major ankle injury, like a severe sprain or Achilles rupture, can take months to heal. If an athlete doesn’t allow enough time for recovery, they are at risk of sustaining a re-injury.

While there is a rising number foot and ankle injuries in athletes and dancers, researchAnkles for Life shows that these injuries can be prevented by performing ankle balance, stretching and strengthening exercises and alternating with another sport. This is why the Midwest Orthopedics at Rush (MOR) and the Illinois Athletic Trainers Association (IATA) have teamed up to promote awareness and prevention of ankle injuries.Ankles for Life aims to provide essential information regarding specific ankle injuries and tips for preventing these injuries in the future.


Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole discuss the recent bone bruise injury suffered by Michael Carter Williams of the Chicago Bulls. Definition, causes, diagnosis, treatment, recovery and decisions on when to return to play.

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Bulls guard Michael Carter-Williams will miss four to six weeks with a left knee bone bruise. Carter-Williams suffered the injury while taking a hard fall on defense. An MRI revealed no ligament damage in his knee, the team said.


Segment Three: Brett Wapotish from Athletico specializes in pelvic floor disorders in men and describes the causes, symtoms and treatment. Chances are you have heard the month of November referred to as Movember several times over the last few years. While the first thing that comes to mind is probably mustaches, it is important to know that there is a bigger cause behind the Movember movement.

movemberMovember brings awareness to common men’s health issues, such as cancer and heart disease, as well as highlights the benefits of living a healthy lifestyle. Athletico has supported the Movember movement for three years via our AthletiMo team, which anyone can join to help raise funds and spread the word about men’s health.

Learn more about how you can participate with the AthletiMo’s

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Responsibilities of a Team Physician; Youth Basketball Guidelines; The Next Hot Trends in Food

Episode 16.30 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Dr. Adam Yanke from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about theMORGif-180x150-link responsibilities and experiences of a head team physician. Dr. Yanke has been recently appointed team physician for the Windy City Bulls. The Windy City Bulls are an American professional basketball team of the NBA Development League and an affiliate of the Chicago Bulls of the National Basketball Association.

yankeDr. Yanke is a sports medicine orthopedic surgeon who treats shoulder and knee dysfunction with a special focus on cartilage restoration and patellofemoral disorders. Along with performing his training including Sports Medicine Fellowship at Rush University, he has also been involved in Doctorate work in Biochemistry focused on the basic science of cartilage restoration. His practice focuses on balancing the use of accepted surgical techniques while also offering access to clinical and surgical trials that provide access to new evolving techniques.

Related:
Windy City Bulls Add Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush Physicians to the Roster

Windy City Bulls Finalize Coaching & Basketball Operations Staff For Inaugural Season


Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole discuss NBA, USA Basketball  first-ever Youth Basketball Guidelines advising Athletes to Delay Single-Sport Specialization Until at Least 14 Years Old – – Includes Maximum and Recommended Participation Guidelines; Emphasizes Weekly Rest Minimums.

Basketball is a great game that is played by millions of young people in the United States and around the world.   Playing basketball fosters the development of peer relationships, self-esteem, leadership qualities, and physical health.

However, an overemphasis on early competitive success has led to several well-recognized issues that exist across youth sports, including in youth basketball:

  • Pressure to begin high-intensity training at a young age
  • Early single-sport specialization
  • Frequent and multiple competitive event scheduling
  • Increased risk for injury, burnout, and disengagement from sports


Segment Three: Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling discusses The Next Hot Trends in Food. You may not have heard of moringa or regenerative grazing yet. But there’s a good chance you will before long.

Trend-spotting in food: What experts say may become the next açaí berry or coconut water.

Not too far in the future, when you reach for a healthy drink, it might be full of water from a cactus.

Your main course at dinner might be a pear-like fruit from Southeast Asia that does a remarkable job of imitating meat. The next candy bar your children bite into might be infused with mushrooms that help cut down on the sugar needed to sweeten the treat. And their breakfast cereal might be colored with algae instead of chemicals.

KarenWhy the wave of exotic delights? Nutrition science—and customers’ rapidly changing tastes—are forcing the food business to search ever farther afield for new edibles.

 Everybody knows standards change—fat was bad, for instance, until the big no-nos became carbs and gluten—and each time they do, a rash of new products appear that claim to be packed with good stuff and free of things that cause harm.
Follow Karen at: www.karenmalkin.com

Bone Fractures among Elite Athletes; Back-to-school: Youth Sports Injuries; Cupping Therapy

Episode 16.20 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Joel Williams, M.D.

Dr. Joel Willams

Segment One: Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph and Dr. Joel Williams from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discuss bone fractures among elite athletes. Dr. Joel C. Williams brings seven years of training and passion for complex fracture care, post-traumatic deformity, pelvis and acetabular surgery, and complex hip surgery to Rush University Medical Center. See related article.

Dr. Williams is a native of Michigan and graduated from the Michigan State University Honors Program. He then attended medical school at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. There, he was awarded a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship and spent a year doing basic science research.

Dr. Williams’ surgical training began at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, where he completed his residency in orthopedic surgery. While a resident, he did a research fellowship and was awarded a grant from the Orthopaedic Trauma Association to investigate fracture healing. Additionally, he was awarded a traveling fellowship from the AO Trauma Foundation to study orthopedic traumatology in Chur, Switzerland with Dr. Cristoph Sommer.


Segment Two: Steve Kashul and Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph talk about back to school-youth sports injuries. Types of injuries being seen in the office; how to minimize the risk and treat youth sports injuries.

Charles Bush-Joseph, M.D.

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph

Long involved in the care of high school, collegiate, and recreational athletes, Dr. Bush-Joseph is the head team physician for the Chicago White Sox Major League Baseball Club and Associate Team Physician for the Chicago Bulls. Through his experience with high-profile professional athletes, Dr. Bush-Joseph was elected to the Major League Baseball Medical Advisory Board and president of the Major League Baseball Team Physician Association for 2012.

This exclusive group of team physicians advises the Major League Baseball Commissioner on medical policy and emerging trends in training and the medical care of the elite athlete. Academically, Dr. Bush-Joseph is nationally renown with leadership roles in several national orthopedic societies and president-elect of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He has authored over 140 published manuscripts and book chapters.


Segment Three: Scott Kaylor from ATI Physical Therapy discusses cupping therapy and why its been so popular with Olympic athletes; potential benefits and  patient expectations. If you watched the Olympic games, you may have spotted the spots: large, red and purple circles on the backs, shoulders, chests, arms and legs of swimmer Michael Phelps, gymnast Alex Naddour, and other top athletes. So whats the deal?

Those circles are the marks left behind by cupping, an ancient Chinese healing practiceCupping Olympic Swimmer that involves placing special cups on the skin and using heat to create suction and promote blood flow.

The red marks are due to stagnant blood and fluid that may have been stuck for a long time being brought up by the suction from deep inside the tissue so the body can flush it out. See related article.

Scott Kaylor is a board certified sports physical therapist with ATI Physical Therapy in Greenville, SC. He is a faculty member of the ATI sports and orthopedic physical therapy residency programs. Scott completed his upper extremity fellowship in 2012 spending that baseball season with the Kansas City Royals. Scott is an avid triathlete and the founder of Kaylor Endurance, an endurance athlete coaching company.

Evaluating Pro Athletes Fitness to Play; Limiting Pitch Counts for HS Pitchers; The Importance of Multiplanar Training

Episode 16.19 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Dr. Cole and Dr. Bush-Joseph compare their experience as head team physician for the Chicago Bulls and Chicago White Sox respectively, evaluating player fitness to play and potential risk of injury, during the recruiting process. Dr. Bush-Joseph is a graduate of the University of Michigan Medical School in 1983, and is currently a Professor at Rush University Medical Center and the Associate Director of the Rush Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Program.

Charles Bush-Joseph, M.D.Dr. Bush-Joseph is a respected educator of medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing orthopedic surgeons lecturing at numerous national educational meetings. He serves on the editorial board of several national orthopedic journals (including the prestigious American Journal of Sports Medicine) and holds committee responsibilities with several national orthopedic societies including the American Academy of Orthopaedics Surgeons and the American Orthopaedic Society Sports Medicine.


Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole talk about the recent change in regulations to limit pitch counts for high school baseball pitchers; the importance of cross training, rest and core strength training in preseason workouts to help minimize the risk of shoulder and elbow overuse injuries and young players; how these injuries and surgeries at the high school level can prevent players from progressing to higher levels of play.

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Segment Three:  Chris Garcia  from ATIPT talks about the Importance of Multiplanar Training.

The activities of running, swimming, and to a lesser extent, cycling all require someThe Importance of Multiplanar Training amount of movement and control in all three dimensions. Despite this, many cross training programs don’t include exercises that involve all three dimensions. For instance, many running programs focus on the sagittal plane (squats, lunges, leg press, and calf raises) and neglect the transverse (side to side) and frontal (rotational) planes.

Most natural human movement is executed in all three dimensions. These three dimensions, or planes of movement, are sagittal, frontal, and transverse. The sagittal plane is forward and backwards movement such as the leg movement with walking. The frontal plane is sideways movement such as jumping jacks. The transverse plane is rotational movement such as rotating your hip or shoulder during a throwing motion.

With running the primary movement occurs in the sagittal plane but one needs to be able to stabilize in the frontal and transverse plane in order to be efficient, powerful, and sustainable. Many of the injuries seen with running are related to too much movement in the frontal or transverse plane. Over pronation, inward collapse of the knee, or an opposite side hip drop are all problems of control in either the frontal or transverse plane.

Biking has its own challenges with lower extremity movement in the sagittal plane but stability needing to come from the upper body by controlling twisting and side bending forces. Many injuries are related to poor fit or alignment of the bike components but many others are related to the mismatch in lower extremity force production and stability of the torso.

Swimming (freestyle) requires sagittal plane lower extremity movement, transverse plane spinal movement/stability, and tri-planar movement of the upper extremities. Many repetitive strain injuries are related to poor stability or control of movement in the lower back and scapula area or a lack of mobility of the upper back or shoulder.

Improving strength and power output through resistance training can improve performance in all of these sports but neglecting the frontal and transverse plane is a common mistake that can actually increase ones risk of injury. Below are several options for developing strength and control in the frontal and transverse planes.

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