Hip Dysplasia  in Young Female Athletes; The NBA Combine; Why we were Skinnier in the 80’s

Episode 17.12 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:20): Dr. Joel Williams from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush describes Hip Dysplasia, symptoms, treatment alternatives and who might be more prone to Image result for hip dysplasiahaving the condition.

Hip dysplasia, a condition where the hip socket doesn’t fully cover the ball portion of the femur, resulting in instability, is rising in young active women, who have probably had it since birth. Recent research shows that receiving care early is vital to a successful treatment experience for hip dysplasia patients.  Doing so may help patients delay or avoid having a total hip replacement (arthroplasty).

Dr. Joel C. Williams brings seven years of training and passion for complex fracture care, post-traumatic deformity, pelvis and acetabular surgery, and complex hip surgery to Rush University Medical Center.

Dr. Williams is a native of Michigan and graduated from the Michigan State University Honors Program. He then attended medical school at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. There, he was awarded a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship and spent a year doing basic science research.

Dr. Williams’ surgical training began at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, where he completed his residency in orthopedic surgery. While a resident, he did a research fellowship and was awarded a grant from the Orthopaedic Trauma Association to investigate fracture healing. Additionally, he was awarded a traveling fellowship from the AO Trauma Foundation to study orthopedic traumatology in Chur, Switzerland with Dr. Cristoph Sommer. More…

Learn more about hip disorders at Hips for Life and download the Prevention Techniques Brochure

Hips for Life


Segment Two (12:26): Dr. Cole as head team physician for the Chicago Bulls discusses the various challenges related to the NBA Draft Combine and how they are dealt with in what is described as a complicated and chaotic process.

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Segment Three (17:09): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks about why it’s harder for adults today to maintain the same weight as those 20 to 30 years ago did, even at the same levels of food intake and exercise; how to maintain a healthy microbiome/weight and how we can avoid the obesity epidemic.

  • People are exposed to more chemicals that might be weight-gain inducing. Pesticides, flame retardants, and the substances in food packaging might all be altering our hormonal processes and tweaking the way our bodies put on and maintain weight.
  • The use of prescription drugs has risen dramatically since the ‘70s and ‘80s. Prozac, the first blockbuster SSRI, came out in 1988. Antidepressants are now one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S., and many of them have been linked to weight gain.
  • The microbiomes of Americans might have somehow changed between the 1980s and now. It’s well known that some types of gut bacteria make a person more prone to weight gain and obesity.
Karen Malkin is certified as an Integrative Health Coach and Lifestyle Practitioner and a Certified Eating Psychology Coach. Karen has a private practice in Glencoe, Illinois.  She passionately serves on the Board of Directors for the Environmental Working Group, the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Spiral Sun Ventures and Gardeneer.

Advancements in Hip Replacement Surgery; Growth Plate Injuries in Young Athletes

Episode 17.10 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.new host image


Segment One(01:56): Dr. Richard Berger from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about the growing number of athletes anddr berger younger patients undergoing hip replacement and his unique procedure for doing hip replacements along with expectations for outcome and recovery. Dr. Berger has pioneered minimally invasive hip and knee replacement, allowing patients to recover faster with less pain than with traditional hip and knee replacement surgery.

His degree in mechanical engineering from MIT has helped him design specialized instruments which allow the surgery to be done without cutting any muscle, tendons, or ligaments. These advances allow most of Dr. Berger’s patients to walk independently and leave the hospital the day of surgery. His mechanical engineering background has also helped him to design gender-specific implants that fit and perform better for active patients.

Find more information about Dr. Berger and the hip injury treatment and prevention program by Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush and the Illinois Athletic Trainers Association at Hips for Life.

Hips for Life


Segment Two (15:10): Dr. Cole and Steve discuss growth plate injuries in young athletes. The growth plate, also known as the epiphyseal plate or physis, is the area of growing tissue near the end of the long bones in children and adolescents. Each long bone has at least two growth plates: one at each end. The growth plate determines the future length and shape of the mature bone. When growth is complete–sometime during adolescence–the growth plates close and are replaced by solid bone.Related image

These injuries occur in children and adolescents. The growth plate is the weakest area of the growing skeleton, weaker than the nearby ligaments and tendons that connect bones to other bones and muscles. In a growing child, a serious injury to a joint is more likely to damage a growth plate than the ligaments that stabilize the joint. An injury that would cause a sprain in an adult can be associated with a growth plate injury in a child.

Injuries to the growth plate are fractures. They comprise 15 percent of all childhood fractures. They occur twice as often in boys as in girls, with the greatest incidence among 14- to 16-year-old boys and 11- to 13-year-old girls. Older girls experience these fractures less often because their bodies mature at an earlier age than boys. As a result, their bones finish growing sooner, and their growth plates are replaced by stronger, solid bone.

While growth plate injuries are caused by an acute event, such as a fall or a blow to a limb, chronic injuries can also result from overuse. For example, a gymnast who practices for hours on the uneven bars, a long-distance runner, or a baseball pitcher perfecting his curve ball can all have growth plate injuries.


Golf Training; OTC vs Rx Medications for Pain; Kettleball Training

Episode 17.09 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.new host image

Dr. Nikhil Verma from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush is filling in this week for Dr. Cole.


Segment One (02:14): Joe Estes from Athletico Physical Therapy talks with Steve and Dr. Verma about preventing Golf Injuries, proper warm up routines and the new indoor simulator at Athletico’s Golf Performance Center in Oak Brook that proudly uses the innovative K-Vest to improve the game for professional and amateur golfers.

The technology behind the K-Vest is a three-sensor wireless system that strategically places sensors on a golfer’s hips, shoulders, and hand to measure motion during a golf swing.  The sensors immediately communicate to a computer a 3D analysis.  This analysis allows the instructor to instantly address critical aspects of a golfer’s body such as hip rotation, speed, sequence and timing.


Segment Two (12:55): Dr. Verma and Steve discuss OTC vs Rx Medications; risks ofRelated image addiction, non-drug alternatives and guidelines for use of OTC pain medications. Dr. Verma is Professor and Director, Division of Sports Medicine, Fellowship Director, Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedics, Rush University Medical Center. Dr. Verma specializes in treatment of the shoulder, elbow and knee with an emphasis on advanced arthroscopic reconstructive techniques of the shoulder, shoulder replacement, knee ligament reconstruction and articular cartilage reconstruction and meniscal transplantation.

U.S. News & World Report ranks the orthopedic program at Rush University Medical Center #4 in the Nation and the highest ranked program in Illinois.


Segment Three (20:00): Gerard Iaculo from Jim Karas Intelligent Fitness & Wellness talks with Steve and Dr. Verma about the use, history and benefits of Kettlebell training.

At JimKaras.com, training is grounded in timeless training principles and has over thirty years of experience recognizing the legitimate innovations in our industry that burn fat (NOT MUSCLE), improve functional performance and decrease your risk of any injury.

Treating Hip Injuries; Responsibilities of a Team Physician; Healing Muscle Soreness

Episode 17.08 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.new host image


Segment One (02:10): Dr. Shane Nho from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discusses hipImage result for femoral acetabular impingement injuries including FAI (Femoroacetabular impingement).  FAI is a condition of too much friction in the hip joint.  Basically, the ball (femoral head) and socket (acetabulum) rub abnormally creating damage to the hip joint.

The damage can occur to the articular cartilage (smooth white surface of the ball or socket) or the labral cartilage (soft tissue bumper of the socket).Most patients can be diagnosed with a good history, physical exam, and plain x-ray films.  A patient’s history will generally involve complaints of hip pain (front, side, or back) and loss of hip motion.

shane nho mdDr. Nho completed his surgical internship at New York Presbyterian Hospital of Weill Cornell Medical College and a residency in orthopedic surgery at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. He returned to the Chicago area to complete a fellowship in sports medicine at Rush University Medical Center.

He was the recipient of the Herodicus Society Traveling Fellowship and has trained with hip arthroscopists and hip joint preservation surgeons from the United States and Switzerland. He has a specific interest in the arthroscopic treatment of athletic hip injuries, hip joint preservation surgery for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), hip labral repairs, shoulder instability, rotator cuff repair, and knee arthroscopy. More…


Segment Two (13:44): Steve talks with Dr. Nikhil Verma from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush about his responsibilities and experience as the head team physician for the Chicago White Sox. Thanks to Dr. Verma for filling in for Dr. Cole as co-host on this episode.nikhil verma

Dr. Verma is Professor and Director, Division of Sports Medicine, Fellowship Director, Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedics, Rush University Medical Center. Dr. Verma specializes in treatment of the shoulder, elbow and knee with an emphasis on advanced arthroscopic reconstructive techniques of the shoulder, shoulder replacement, knee ligament reconstruction and articular cartilage reconstruction and meniscal transplantation.

A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Dr. Verma completed his orthopedic residency at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center. He then completed a fellowship at the Hospital for Special Surgery in sports medicine and shoulder surgery. While in New York, he served as an assistant team physician for the St. John’s University Athletic Department. He also received specialized training in treatment of shoulder and elbow disorders in the overhead throwing athlete. More…


Segment Three (22:01): Jon Duncombe, PT, DPT, MSPT, OCS, CIMT, CSCS, GCS from ATI Physical Therapy discusses healing muscle soreness. John received his Master’s of Physical Therapy degree from the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 2001, has obtained his Doctorate in Physical Therapy through the Evidence in Motion Institute of Health Professions (EIM) and has also finished a 2 year Orthopedic Residency program with EIM. He is board certified as an Orthopedic Clinical Specialist from the American Physical Therapy Association.

While at the University of Wisconsin he became a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist with the National Strength and Conditioning Association as well as a Golf Conditioning Specialist. John treats a vast array of outpatient orthopedic dysfunctions, looking at a wide variety of structures, tissues, and systems that may be contributing to the source of symptoms.

His special interests are in post surgical shoulder and knee patients as well as cervical-thoracic injuries. John works for ATI Physical Therapy in the northern suburbs outside of Chicago, where he serves on their Education Advisory Board, is chairman of the ATI Spine Education Committee, and also serves as a Mentor Leader for current EIM Doctoral and Residency students.