Hip Dysplasia  in Young Female Athletes; The NBA Combine; Why we were Skinnier in the 80’s

Episode 17.12 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:20): Dr. Joel Williams from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush describes Hip Dysplasia, symptoms, treatment alternatives and who might be more prone to Image result for hip dysplasiahaving the condition.

Hip dysplasia, a condition where the hip socket doesn’t fully cover the ball portion of the femur, resulting in instability, is rising in young active women, who have probably had it since birth. Recent research shows that receiving care early is vital to a successful treatment experience for hip dysplasia patients.  Doing so may help patients delay or avoid having a total hip replacement (arthroplasty).

Dr. Joel C. Williams brings seven years of training and passion for complex fracture care, post-traumatic deformity, pelvis and acetabular surgery, and complex hip surgery to Rush University Medical Center.

Dr. Williams is a native of Michigan and graduated from the Michigan State University Honors Program. He then attended medical school at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. There, he was awarded a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship and spent a year doing basic science research.

Dr. Williams’ surgical training began at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, where he completed his residency in orthopedic surgery. While a resident, he did a research fellowship and was awarded a grant from the Orthopaedic Trauma Association to investigate fracture healing. Additionally, he was awarded a traveling fellowship from the AO Trauma Foundation to study orthopedic traumatology in Chur, Switzerland with Dr. Cristoph Sommer. More…

Learn more about hip disorders at Hips for Life and download the Prevention Techniques Brochure

Hips for Life


Segment Two (12:26): Dr. Cole as head team physician for the Chicago Bulls discusses the various challenges related to the NBA Draft Combine and how they are dealt with in what is described as a complicated and chaotic process.

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Segment Three (17:09): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks about why it’s harder for adults today to maintain the same weight as those 20 to 30 years ago did, even at the same levels of food intake and exercise; how to maintain a healthy microbiome/weight and how we can avoid the obesity epidemic.

  • People are exposed to more chemicals that might be weight-gain inducing. Pesticides, flame retardants, and the substances in food packaging might all be altering our hormonal processes and tweaking the way our bodies put on and maintain weight.
  • The use of prescription drugs has risen dramatically since the ‘70s and ‘80s. Prozac, the first blockbuster SSRI, came out in 1988. Antidepressants are now one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S., and many of them have been linked to weight gain.
  • The microbiomes of Americans might have somehow changed between the 1980s and now. It’s well known that some types of gut bacteria make a person more prone to weight gain and obesity.
Karen Malkin is certified as an Integrative Health Coach and Lifestyle Practitioner and a Certified Eating Psychology Coach. Karen has a private practice in Glencoe, Illinois.  She passionately serves on the Board of Directors for the Environmental Working Group, the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Spiral Sun Ventures and Gardeneer.

Bio-individual nutrition rules the day; Helmet Safety

Episode 17.03 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling discusses the benefits of Bio-individual Nutrition and a creating a food plan to fit your physiology and biology. It’s easy to get seduced by the prevalence of trendy eating options. Gluten-free, paleo, ketogenic, macrobiotic, low-glycemic, low-carb, dairy-free, vegan, fruitarian, and the list goes on and on….karen  

What makes this even more difficult is that for every physician or nutrition Ph.D. making a claim with science to back it up, there’s another researcher who can debunk it with an equally legitimate study.  

Related Post: Forget One-size fits All

Combat nutrition imbalances by including protein, fiber, colorful veggies and healthy fats in your meals and snacks. Try one of her gluten and dairy free, no added sugar, Transformation Bars. Each bar contains 11g of protein and 12g of fiber. They make a great snack, especially for people on-the-go.

Save $10 when ordering Transformation Bars>> Enter Code: ESPN1000


Segment Two: Samantha Cochran from Athletico Physical Therapy discusses helmet safety when participating in various sports, proper use and fitting of helmets. While all leagues and teams require helmets, many coaches, players and parents don’t know exactly how to choose a helmet that will provide the right protection. Athletico has developed a step-by-step guide to educate parents, athletes and coaches on selecting and wearing helmets.

Proper Fitting Tips for Protective Equipment

  • Always follow manufacturer’s guidelines when fitting any helmet2017 national athletic training month
  • Hair should be wet when fitting any helmet
  • Each part of the helmet serves a purpose
  • Attention to detail and wearing every helmet properly ensures maximum protection
  • Never cut corners
  • Replace any helmet that has been damaged
  • Look for the NOCSAE seal of approval
  • Comfort is key
  • If your helmet is fitted properly but not comfortable, explore other options

Samantha Cochran is an athletic trainer with Athletico Physical Therapy at Malcolm X College within the City Colleges of Chicago. She received her Master of Science degree with a concentration in Kinesiology in 2014 from Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi. In her time at TAMUCC she served as a graduate assistant athletic trainer for Islanders’ athletics from 2012-2014.

Meet the White Sox’s New Top Doc; Best Fats to Fuel your Workout

Episode 17.01 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Head team physician discusses his role keeping players on fieldDr. Nik Verma from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about his new role.  Hear how he and the other team physicians at Rush help keep Sox players healthy through the long baseball season.

  • Fellowship Director, Professor and Chief of Sports Medicine at Rush Universitynikhil verma Medical Center
  • Shoulder, Elbow and Knee Surgeon at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush
  • Head Team Physician for Chicago White Sox & Team Physician for Chicago Bulls and Nazareth Academy
  • Advanced Arthroscopic Reconstructive Techniques and Cartilage Restoration expertise
  • Voted Top 10-15% of Top Doctors in America® by U.S.NewWorld Report and Castle Connolly
  • Associate Editor of the Arthroscopy Journal and Editorial Board Member of Journal of Knee Surgery

Segment Two: Karen Malkin discusses the importance of MCTs- medium chain triglycerides: what are they and why are so many athletes adding them to their fitness plans. We tend to think carbohydrates give us the most energy.  How do MCTs compare to carbohydrates for fuel?

Best fats to cook with: Olive oil is known to be one of the healthiest fats for cardiovascular health.  Why shouldn’t we cook with olive oil? What are the best fats for high heat cooking? Can you cook with MCT oil?

Dr. Cole and Steve talk with Karen about the effectiveness of her 14 Day Transformation Program. Enter ESPN1000 in the Coupon Code box for a $100 discount.

Lifestyle and health are transformed though integrative health coaching. Karen practices a client-centered approach that acknowledges the interdependent roles of mind, body and spirit, and the innate healing capacity within each person, with an emphasis on self-care. Read more >>


  

New Openings: Barry’s Boot Camp & True Food Kitchen; Optons for Weight Loss

Episode 16.35 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Joey Gonzalez CEO of Barry’s Boot Camp in Chicago discusses the opening of their new Chicago Location.

Since 1998, Barry’s Bootcamp has been delivering The Best Workout in the World®  to a legendary following, including A-list celebs, models—even Olympic athletes. Our signature hour-long workouts include 25-30 minutes of interval cardiovascular treadmill routines and 25-30 minutes of strength training utilizing free weights, resistance bands, medicine balls and other equipment. Instructors, muscle groups and even workout segments vary throughout the week so that no one class is ever the same.

Our innovative technique works to “shock” the body in the most efficient and effectivebarrys-logo way to improve your cardiovascular system, lose weight and build muscle. Our world-class instructors are the best in the business and promote a positive, supportive environment that will help you break past your own personal boundaries. Regardless of skill level, you can burn 1,000 calories in just one hour. You will see and feel results right away in a thumping music-filled environment where every class feels new, fun and exciting.


Segment Two: Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counceling discusses Dr. Andrew Weil’s True Food Kitchen. All True Food Kitchen locations feature dishes that closely adhere to the principles of Dr. Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet. They are intended to be a new kind of restaurant: one in which delicious flavors, healthy nutrients, environmental awareness and an inviting atmosphere come together to create an unforgettable dining experience.

Dishes are influenced by Mediterranean, Asian and Californian cuisine, and include soups, appetizers, salads, pasta, rice and noodle dishes, wood grilled dishes, sandwiches and burgers, brick oven pizzas and desserts.

Karen Malkin-Karen Malkin Health Counseling

Sample dishes: Wild Smoked Salmon with Shaved Radishes; Lemon Cream & Wasabi Peas; Sashimi Tuna Salad with Avocado, Cucumber, Tomato, Edamame & Ginger; Curry Chicken with Rice Noodles; Tuscan Kale Salad; Cauliflower & Cashews; Herbed Hummus; Green Tea Soba Noodles with Peas; Bok Choy & Lemongrass; Fresh Tomato Pizza with Pasilla Chile & Manchego; Grilled Wild Ahi Sliders with Wasabi, Radishes and Cucumber on Pumpernickel; and Natural Half Chicken with Farro, Walnuts, Dried Fig, Brussels Sprouts & Squash.


Segment Three: Dr. Alfonso Torquoti from Rush University Medical Center discusses options for the treatment of obesity including Bariatric Surgery. Bariatric surgery, also called weight loss surgery, helps severely obese people lose weight. In doing so, it also helps prevent or improve obesity-related conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure. During a bariatric procedure, a surgeon removes or blocks off part of your stomach. This leaves you feeling fuller sooner and reduces your desire to eat. Some types of bariatric surgery also limit your body’s absorption of calories from food.

Bariatric surgery is an effective way to lose weight and reduce the risk of obesity-related health problems. It might be a good choice for you if these statements are true:

  • You are morbidly obese. This means you have a BMI, or body mass index, of at least 40, or a BMI of at least 35 plus an obesity-related disease such as diabetes or high blood pressure. Determine your BMI.
  • You have tried to lose weight using other methods and they have not worked.
  • You are committed to making the changes necessary for long-term success. Surgery is only the beginning of the weight-loss journey. To lose weight and keep it off — which most bariatric surgery patients are able to do — you will have to commit to making healthy choices.