Do High Schools Need Athletic Trainers?; Understanding Elbow Injury; Advancements in Regenerative Medicine

Episode 17.02 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Katie Varnado from ATI Physical Therapy talks about the responsibilities and qualifications for Athletic Trainers, the difference between pro & non-pro team trainers, the importance of having High School Trainers and how to promote their use.

Katie Varnado is a certified and licensed athletic trainer who is passionate aboutKatie Varnado educating others about concussions, growth plate injuries in athletes, and the need for athletic trainers. In her role as Sports Medicine Director at ATI Physical Therapy, she oversees and provides guidance to the athletic trainers ATI provides to local high schools and colleges and ensures all athletes are receiving comprehensive care to return to sport as quickly and safely as possible.

Katie received her bachelor’s degree in kinesiology with a concentration in athletic training from Illinois State University.  She then went on to earn a prestigious year long sports medicine fellowship at the Steadman Hawkins Clinic in Vail, CO.  Katie has over fourteen years of experience working with both collegiate and high school athletics as well as working with physicians.


Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole discuss the various types of elbow injuries, causes and treatments. Dr. Cole describes the many new and interesting advancements in Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Therapy – the future of research and applications.

Related Posts: 

Improve your Understanding with 3D Animation on UCL Reconstruction (Tommy John Surgery)

Baseball and Softball: Pain After Pitching

Limiting Innings Pitched after Tommy John Surgery for MLB Players

Shoulder and Elbow Overuse Injuries

Overuse Injuries in Young Athletes


  

New Cartilage Transplant Technology; Rotator Cuff Tendonitis; Yoga and Why you Should Do It

Episode 16.25 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Dr. Vishal Mehta, an orthopedic surgeon who was on our show last year sharing his experience with ProChondrix, a fresh cartilage allograft from AlloSource. Dr. Mehta is back with us one year later to talk about the results he is seeing with the product and how his patients are doing. Dr. Mehta is a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine. ProChondrix® is a new treatment option for patients suffering from debilitating cartilage defects who do not want to give up their active lifestyle.

Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole discuss the causes, symtoms and treatment for rotator cuff tendonitis. Rotator cuff tendinitis, or tendonitis, affects the tendons and muscles that help move the shoulder joint. If you have tendinitis, it means that your tendons are inflamed or irritated. Rotator cuff tendinitis is also called impingement syndrome.

  1. Rotator cuff tendinitis, or tendonitis, occurs when the tendons and muscles thatRotator-Cuff-Tendonitis
    help move the shoulder joint are inflamed or irritated.
  2. It commonly occurs in people who play sports that frequently require extending the arm over the head.
  3. Most people with rotator cuff tendinitis can regain full function of the shoulder without any pain after treatment.

https://smwhome.net/2016/09/05/what-is-rotator-cuff-tendinitis/

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Segment Three: Yoga and Why you Should Do It by Alicia Molloy from ATI Physical yogaTherapy. “Yoga means different things to different people, but I think everyone that practices yoga has a story about how it has been beneficial to their health in at least one way. Flexibility and stress management/reduction are two benefits that people readily agree upon. However, both through my personal experiences as well as those of my students, I have seen yoga help people sleep better, eat better, and reduce their risk of injuries from other activities. I’ve had students alleviate back pain and reduce the frequency of their migraines. Yoga definitely isn’t <a panacea> to fix all ills and prevent diseases, but it does way more for your health than giving you Gumby-like flexibility.”

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Bone Fractures among Elite Athletes; Back-to-school: Youth Sports Injuries; Cupping Therapy

Episode 16.20 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Joel Williams, M.D.

Dr. Joel Willams

Segment One: Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph and Dr. Joel Williams from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discuss bone fractures among elite athletes. Dr. Joel C. Williams brings seven years of training and passion for complex fracture care, post-traumatic deformity, pelvis and acetabular surgery, and complex hip surgery to Rush University Medical Center. See related article.

Dr. Williams is a native of Michigan and graduated from the Michigan State University Honors Program. He then attended medical school at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. There, he was awarded a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship and spent a year doing basic science research.

Dr. Williams’ surgical training began at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, where he completed his residency in orthopedic surgery. While a resident, he did a research fellowship and was awarded a grant from the Orthopaedic Trauma Association to investigate fracture healing. Additionally, he was awarded a traveling fellowship from the AO Trauma Foundation to study orthopedic traumatology in Chur, Switzerland with Dr. Cristoph Sommer.


Segment Two: Steve Kashul and Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph talk about back to school-youth sports injuries. Types of injuries being seen in the office; how to minimize the risk and treat youth sports injuries.

Charles Bush-Joseph, M.D.

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph

Long involved in the care of high school, collegiate, and recreational athletes, Dr. Bush-Joseph is the head team physician for the Chicago White Sox Major League Baseball Club and Associate Team Physician for the Chicago Bulls. Through his experience with high-profile professional athletes, Dr. Bush-Joseph was elected to the Major League Baseball Medical Advisory Board and president of the Major League Baseball Team Physician Association for 2012.

This exclusive group of team physicians advises the Major League Baseball Commissioner on medical policy and emerging trends in training and the medical care of the elite athlete. Academically, Dr. Bush-Joseph is nationally renown with leadership roles in several national orthopedic societies and president-elect of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He has authored over 140 published manuscripts and book chapters.


Segment Three: Scott Kaylor from ATI Physical Therapy discusses cupping therapy and why its been so popular with Olympic athletes; potential benefits and  patient expectations. If you watched the Olympic games, you may have spotted the spots: large, red and purple circles on the backs, shoulders, chests, arms and legs of swimmer Michael Phelps, gymnast Alex Naddour, and other top athletes. So whats the deal?

Those circles are the marks left behind by cupping, an ancient Chinese healing practiceCupping Olympic Swimmer that involves placing special cups on the skin and using heat to create suction and promote blood flow.

The red marks are due to stagnant blood and fluid that may have been stuck for a long time being brought up by the suction from deep inside the tissue so the body can flush it out. See related article.

Scott Kaylor is a board certified sports physical therapist with ATI Physical Therapy in Greenville, SC. He is a faculty member of the ATI sports and orthopedic physical therapy residency programs. Scott completed his upper extremity fellowship in 2012 spending that baseball season with the Kansas City Royals. Scott is an avid triathlete and the founder of Kaylor Endurance, an endurance athlete coaching company.

Evaluating Pro Athletes Fitness to Play; Limiting Pitch Counts for HS Pitchers; The Importance of Multiplanar Training

Episode 16.19 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Dr. Cole and Dr. Bush-Joseph compare their experience as head team physician for the Chicago Bulls and Chicago White Sox respectively, evaluating player fitness to play and potential risk of injury, during the recruiting process. Dr. Bush-Joseph is a graduate of the University of Michigan Medical School in 1983, and is currently a Professor at Rush University Medical Center and the Associate Director of the Rush Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Program.

Charles Bush-Joseph, M.D.Dr. Bush-Joseph is a respected educator of medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing orthopedic surgeons lecturing at numerous national educational meetings. He serves on the editorial board of several national orthopedic journals (including the prestigious American Journal of Sports Medicine) and holds committee responsibilities with several national orthopedic societies including the American Academy of Orthopaedics Surgeons and the American Orthopaedic Society Sports Medicine.


Segment Two: Steve and Dr. Cole talk about the recent change in regulations to limit pitch counts for high school baseball pitchers; the importance of cross training, rest and core strength training in preseason workouts to help minimize the risk of shoulder and elbow overuse injuries and young players; how these injuries and surgeries at the high school level can prevent players from progressing to higher levels of play.

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Segment Three:  Chris Garcia  from ATIPT talks about the Importance of Multiplanar Training.

The activities of running, swimming, and to a lesser extent, cycling all require someThe Importance of Multiplanar Training amount of movement and control in all three dimensions. Despite this, many cross training programs don’t include exercises that involve all three dimensions. For instance, many running programs focus on the sagittal plane (squats, lunges, leg press, and calf raises) and neglect the transverse (side to side) and frontal (rotational) planes.

Most natural human movement is executed in all three dimensions. These three dimensions, or planes of movement, are sagittal, frontal, and transverse. The sagittal plane is forward and backwards movement such as the leg movement with walking. The frontal plane is sideways movement such as jumping jacks. The transverse plane is rotational movement such as rotating your hip or shoulder during a throwing motion.

With running the primary movement occurs in the sagittal plane but one needs to be able to stabilize in the frontal and transverse plane in order to be efficient, powerful, and sustainable. Many of the injuries seen with running are related to too much movement in the frontal or transverse plane. Over pronation, inward collapse of the knee, or an opposite side hip drop are all problems of control in either the frontal or transverse plane.

Biking has its own challenges with lower extremity movement in the sagittal plane but stability needing to come from the upper body by controlling twisting and side bending forces. Many injuries are related to poor fit or alignment of the bike components but many others are related to the mismatch in lower extremity force production and stability of the torso.

Swimming (freestyle) requires sagittal plane lower extremity movement, transverse plane spinal movement/stability, and tri-planar movement of the upper extremities. Many repetitive strain injuries are related to poor stability or control of movement in the lower back and scapula area or a lack of mobility of the upper back or shoulder.

Improving strength and power output through resistance training can improve performance in all of these sports but neglecting the frontal and transverse plane is a common mistake that can actually increase ones risk of injury. Below are several options for developing strength and control in the frontal and transverse planes.

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