Health Coaching vs Nutritionist; Helmet Safety

Episode 17.22 

Segment One (01:56): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks with Steve and Dr. Cole about customizing your diet to your own physiology and biology. With all the options-resources available today and information overload, Karen helps to simplify decisions on “Whats Right for Me”.

For Special Savings with Karen please visit:

14daytransformation.com and use the Coupon Code ESPN1000


Segment Two (16:03): Samantha Cochran from Athletico Physical Therapy discusses helmet safety when participating in various sports, proper use and fitting of helmets. While all leagues and teams require helmets, many coaches, players and parents don’t know exactly how to choose a helmet that will provide the right protection. Athletico has developed a step-by-step guide to educate parents, athletes and coaches on selecting and wearing helmets.

Proper Fitting Tips for Protective Equipment

  • Always follow manufacturer’s guidelines when fitting any helmet2017 national athletic training month
  • Hair should be wet when fitting any helmet
  • Each part of the helmet serves a purpose
  • Attention to detail and wearing every helmet properly ensures maximum protection
  • Never cut corners
  • Replace any helmet that has been damaged
  • Look for the NOCSAE seal of approval
  • Comfort is key
  • If your helmet is fitted properly but not comfortable, explore other options

Samantha Cochran is an athletic trainer with Athletico Physical Therapy at Malcolm X College within the City Colleges of Chicago. She received her Master of Science degree with a concentration in Kinesiology in 2014 from Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi. In her time at TAMUCC she served as a graduate assistant athletic trainer for Islanders’ athletics from 2012-2014.

Helmet Fitting Tips from Athletico Physical Therapy

Tracking Patient Outcomes; Tips for the Aging Athlete; Active Father finds Healing after Tissue Transplant

Episode 17.21

Segment One (01:20): Dr. Nikhil Verma from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discusses the importance of tracking patient outcomes: value based care; measuring quality ofnikhil verma care vs cost; which techniques work best based on patient outcomes; how the outcomes meet specific conditions and expectations.

Dr. Verma is a Professor and Director, Division of Sports Medicine, Fellowship Director, Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedics, Rush University Medical Center, Team Physician, Chicago White Sox/Chicago Bulls.

Dr. Verma specializes in treatment of the shoulder, elbow and knee with an emphasis on advanced arthroscopic reconstructive techniques of the shoulder, shoulder replacement, knee ligament reconstruction and articular cartilage reconstruction and meniscal transplantation.

Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush is widely recognized as the regional leader in comprehensive orthopedic services. 

View all Specialties


Segment Two (11:23): Dr. Leython Williams from Athletico Physical Threrapy discusses the benefits of accepting and adjusting to the inevitability of aging. Aging gracefully is linked to healthy diet, regular exercise and good genes.

Athletes both professional and amateur often refuse to let age slow them down. However, even the most elite athletes are not immune to aging; rebuilding bone and gaining muscle; trading intensity for duration; cooling down for gradual decrease in intensity.

Dr. Williams is a Doctor of Physical Therapy and facility manager for Athletico Physical Therapy at their Lincolnshire facility. He is a former Division 1 athlete that infuses his experience as an elite athlete into his evidence-based practice in the outpatient orthopedic setting.

Dr. Williams is an expert in musculoskeletal function and rehabilitation as he seeks to restore functionality and decrease pain. His mission aligns with Athletico is providing progressive outpatient therapy through personalized care that emphasizes patient education and injury prevention.

Schedule a Complimentary Injury Screen


Segment Three (21:07): Cartilage transplant Phil Pizzano is an active husband, father and former Division I soccer player discusses his tissue transplant with Steve and Dr. Cole.

phil-2

In 2012, he began to suffer from debilitating knee pain. After enduring years of pain and surgery, he met with a doctor who told him he was a candidate for an osteochondral allograft transplant. In the two and a half years since that surgery, he’s been able to keep up with his two children and even picked up CrossFit.

Learn More at Allograft Possibilities

Common Hand Injuries: Text Thumb; Little League Pitchers: Do’s & Don’ts; Importance of Sleep for Optimal Recovery

Episode 17.35 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:10): Dr. Nik Verma sitting in this week for Dr. Cole joins Steve andImage result for thumb overuse Nicole Kauppila from Athletico Physical Therapy to discuss Tech Thumb injury.

Each year as we approach the holidays, smartphones are listed as a top gift.  With use of smart phones – tech-related injuries called “tech-thumb” resulting from unnatural movements like constant texting are on the rise.

New smartphones often means even more time straining thumbs, in fact young adults spend a staggering one-third of their waking hours on smart phones. Nicole describes causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment for overuse injuries of the hand.


 Segment Two (11:46): Dr. Nik Verma, Head Team Physician for the Chicago White Sox talks with Steve about how to avoid overuse throwing injuries in young athletes; avoid training in one sport all year long, high pitch velocity and pitch counts that can cause damage from repetitive load on the growth plates of young athletes.

Image result for little league pitcher


Segment Three (20:14): Todd Sayer, PT from ATI Physical Therapy talks about the importance of sleep for optimal recovery; the correct supportive neutral sleep position; avoiding compressed shoulder joint in side sleepers. 

How you sleep dictates how you perform, so whether you are falling short on logging enough sleep each night or poor sleep posture is inhibiting a solid day’s performance, making a few simple changes can help to enable a good night’s rest and support your body’s ability to adapt and adjust.

Todd Sayer  is a Senior Regional Director with ATI. He has 18 years of clinical experience specializing in treatment outpatient orthopedic and sports medicine injuries as well as chronic pain and post-operative care.

Overcoming Sleep Challenges and Discomfort

Platform Tennis Injuries; Understanding Cryotherapy; Muscle Activation Techniques

Episode 17.32 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One (01:30): Dr. Leda Ghannad from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discusses platform tennis injuries.IMG_0854.JPG

The first-ever national study of platform (paddle) tennis injuries revealed 66 percent of paddle tennis players say they sustained an injury from playing the game. The study also found that of the platform tennis players reporting an injury, more than half sustained two or more.

The most common conditions reported were injuries to the shin/calf (21%), knee (16%), elbow (16%), ankle (13%) and shoulder (10%). Sixty percent of the injuries were caused by overuse and 40 percent were due to an incident that occurred during play. The study, which involved an online survey of American Platform Tennis Association players nationwide, was coordinated by Dr. Leda Ghannad, a sports medicine physician at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, with approval from the internal review board at Rush University Medical Center. More than 1,000 players responded to the survey.

“We knew it was a high-injury sport based on the number of paddle patients we treat,” admits Dr. Ghannad. “But until now, there wasn’t any research that proved this. Paddle tennis requires a mixture of speed, agility and quick bursts of energy, which makes athletes more susceptible to getting hurt. Many players are also middle-aged ‘weekend warriors’ who don’t strengthen or stretch their muscles and ligaments in between games or practices.”

Paddle tennis is similar to tennis but is played outside in the winter on a small, elevated court surrounded by a screen. Courts are heated from underneath to clear snow and ice. Most participants are between the ages of 40 and 65.


Segment Two (10:25): What is Cryotherapy? Uses and application of ice vs heat by Matt Gauthier from Athletico Physical Therapy

The most long-standing and common form of “cryotherapy” is the application of ice or cold packs to injuries to cause blood vessels to constrict, which reduces blood flow and alleviates pain, swelling and inflammation. While there is still some debate over the longer-term effects on healing, such localized (i.e., applied to specific part of the body) “cryotherapy” certainly seems to have clear short-term benefits and has long been standard practice among health professionals. 

Unlike localized cryotherapy, whole body cryotherapy consists of exposing the entire body to very low (subzero) temperatures, sometimes below -200 degrees Fahrenheit, for a few minutes (typically between 2 and 4 minutes). Often, the person will stand in a tank or closet-like device, wear minimal clothing and be bathed in liquid nitrogen or refrigerated cold air…like taking the ultimate cold shower.


Segment Three (21:42): Skip Chapman from Fitness Formula Club discusses Muscle Activation Techniques. In recent years, a revolutionary new process has evolved for identifying and correcting muscular imbalances in the body known as Muscle Activation Techniques™ (MAT). This exciting and unique system can dramatically improve joint stability, increase range of motion, reduce subjective complaints, and enhance overall function and performance for individuals of all ages and present abilities.

MAT™ looks at muscle tightness as a form of protection in the body. Weak or inhibited muscles can create the need for other muscles to tighten up in order to help stabilize the joints. MAT™ gets to the root of the complaint or injury by addressing muscle weakness rather than muscle tightness. This helps to restore normal body alignment, thereby, improving performance and decreasing subjective complaints.

If you are an athlete, fitness enthusiast, or rehabilitation patient who is:

  • Seriously concerned about joint health as you ageFitness Formula Clubs
  • Hesitant to exercise as hard as you want due to chronic injury and pain
  • Confused about how best to stop joint pain when working out
  • Worried about chronic aches and pains post workout
  • Stiff and inflexible and stretching is not working
  • Tired of nagging injuries preventing your fitness progress