Plantar Fasciitis: How Physical Therapy Can Help

Discussion with Sarah Ryerson from Athletico Physical Therapy about Plantar Fasciitis: characteristics that make someone more susceptible to plantar fasciitis; recommended stretches and exercises to prevent plantar fasciitis; some of the latest treatments for plantar fasciitis that Physical Therapists at Athletico are using.

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. This condition impacts the plantar fascia, which is a thick band of fibrous connective tissue on the bottom of the foot that extends from the heel to the toes. Based on its location and makeup, the plantar fascia is ideally positioned to maintain and support the arch on the bottom of the foot. However, it is not designed to be the primary stabilizing structure. Read more in related article: https://smwhome.net/2019/01/28/plantar-fasciitis-how-physical-therapy-can-help/

Sarah possesses 17 years of clinical experience as a physical therapist in the orthopedic setting. Additionally, she is a Certified Athletic Trainer a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, and is certified in the Graston method of soft tissue mobilization and Virtual Gait Analysis. With a passion for teaching, Sarah worked as a lab assistant at Northern Illinois University and co-taught in the PTA program at College of DuPage for 9 years.

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Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush (MOR) Sports Performance Center

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David Heidloff, Athletico’s Manager of The Sports Performance Center at MOR in Oak Brook Illinois, talks with Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph and Steve Kashul about the opening of the brand new Sports Performance Center at Rush in Oak Brook IL, what services it offers and how it is different than a typical strength and conditioning facility.

At Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush (MOR) Sports Performance Center, our goal is to bridge the gap between sports medicine and sports performance. Using evidence-based methods and the world’s best equipment at our state-of-the-art facility, we are helping athletes of all levels transition from injury to a confident return to their sport. Our programs don’t just get you back to activity, they also enhance performance – building strength, improving agility, addressing injury risk factors, and bolstering confidence for athletes returning to sport.

Within our new facility in Oak Brook is a state-of-the-art sports performance center dedicated to helping patients confidently return to sport after injury with programs such as a functional sports assessment. Additional services are also available such as blood flow restriction training, video throwing assessment, strength and conditioning services and video gait analysis.

Our team has extensive experience working with athletes from the professional teams like the Chicago Bulls, Chicago White Sox and Chicago Fire as well as little leagues and club soccer teams. We believe all athletes deserve access to effective strength and conditioning programming derived from medically sound foundations.

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Wider adoption of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)

Dr. Brian Cole and Steve Kashul talk with Dr. Steven Feinstein about the use of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging and the prevention of heart attacks and strokes. Dr. Feinstein developed the first two FDA approved ultrasound contrast agents and is recognized as one of the leading pioneers in the development of non-invasive contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging techniques. Dr. Feinstein is a Professor at the Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College.

Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) offers a new, safe, radiation-free modality to help problem-solve diagnostic questions in a wide range of clinical applications, according to an article published by researchers from the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at University of California San Francisco.Steven B. Feinstein, MD practices Cardiovascular Disease in Chicago

Ultrasound contrast agents have been in use throughout most of the world and have been used off-label in the United State for over a decade. In addition to the use of ultrasound contrast agents in cardiac imaging, the FDA recently approved their use in liver imaging for both paediatric and adult patients, and for use in the urinary tract (voiding ultrasonography) in paediatric patients for evaluation of suspected or known vesicoureteral reflux (VUR).

The recent FDA approvals are likely to spur wider adoption of CEUS, says the article, which details the modality’s key advantages. Since the contrast agents are excreted by the lungs they are safe in patients with renal and/or liver dysfunction whom otherwise may not be able to undergo a contrast-enhanced evaluation. Also, CEUS provides unique advantages and can improve visualisation of blood flow and tissue vascularity.


Carson Lux, PT, SFG-I, 3DMAPS, FMS/SFMAAlso in this segment is a conversation with Carson Lux, a physical therapist and Program Head in the Movement Performance Project at Athletico Physical Therapy. Carson shares his 30 years of experience after graduating from the University of Evansville in 1989. He played HS football, basketball, collegiate baseball, and studied Aikido. Carson subsequently has undergone multiple orthopedic surgeries as a result of his own athletic career and has a unique understanding of what athletes must endure to return to their sports and the current therapy techniques to speed injury rehabilitation.

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The Emotional Impact of Injuries

emotional impact of injuries

Dr. Cole and Steve Kashul talk with Tara Hackney PT, DPT, OCS, KTTP, a physical therapist with Athletico. Tara earned her Orthopedic Clinical Specialty (OCS) certification due to an interest in orthopedic rehabilitation. She holds certifications in Graston Technique, Kinesiotape, and FMS testing.

As much as we would like to prevent injuries, they do occur. In an ideal world, an injury would not disrupt our regular activities or participation in sport. But many times injuries lead to shifts in our regular activities. For many athletes, this injury can trigger an emotional and mental response.

Emotional responses that can occur after injury:

  • Sadness
  • Isolation
  • Irritation
  • Lack of motivation
  • Anger
  • Frustration
  • Changes in appetite
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Disengagement

There is no correct way for an athlete to respond to an injury; every athlete is an individual and their response will vary. It is important to note that the emotional response to injury may change throughout the course of healing. It starts at the time of the injury but continues throughout rehab, and into the return-to-play phase as well. The healthcare team should be aware of emotional responses and be on the lookout for athletes who may not have proper coping to these intense emotions.

How Can We Help Injured Athletes Emotionally During Recovery?  (related article)

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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