How Snow Skiing can help keep You Young!

Snow Skiing as a Natural Anti-Aging Remedy

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush and Steve Kashul talk with Peter Braun MS, LAT, ATC, ITAT from ATI Physical Therapy. This discussion focuses on how snow skiing can keep you young and what make skiing a unique type of exercise.

The effects of time on one’s body are unavoidable and often substantial. Many of us in the field of medicine are in an endless search to find the perfect sport, activity or exercise that will unlock our physical potential, well into our years. Scientific research has found that there are certain factors that contribute to longevity and sustainability.


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Bone density, lower extremity strength, balance and cardiovascular endurance all play critical roles in maintaining a physically active lifestyle. With this, physicians make an effort to integrate these factors into exercise plans for much of our elderly population. But what if there was a simpler answer? What if we could prescribe involvement in a recreational activity that naturally addresses all these areas? As we unravel the details, we challenge the question; “Is there such a thing as an anti-aging activity?”

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Wider adoption of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)

Dr. Brian Cole and Steve Kashul talk with Dr. Steven Feinstein about the use of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging and the prevention of heart attacks and strokes. Dr. Feinstein developed the first two FDA approved ultrasound contrast agents and is recognized as one of the leading pioneers in the development of non-invasive contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging techniques. Dr. Feinstein is a Professor at the Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College.

Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) offers a new, safe, radiation-free modality to help problem-solve diagnostic questions in a wide range of clinical applications, according to an article published by researchers from the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at University of California San Francisco.Steven B. Feinstein, MD practices Cardiovascular Disease in Chicago

Ultrasound contrast agents have been in use throughout most of the world and have been used off-label in the United State for over a decade. In addition to the use of ultrasound contrast agents in cardiac imaging, the FDA recently approved their use in liver imaging for both paediatric and adult patients, and for use in the urinary tract (voiding ultrasonography) in paediatric patients for evaluation of suspected or known vesicoureteral reflux (VUR).

The recent FDA approvals are likely to spur wider adoption of CEUS, says the article, which details the modality’s key advantages. Since the contrast agents are excreted by the lungs they are safe in patients with renal and/or liver dysfunction whom otherwise may not be able to undergo a contrast-enhanced evaluation. Also, CEUS provides unique advantages and can improve visualisation of blood flow and tissue vascularity.


Carson Lux, PT, SFG-I, 3DMAPS, FMS/SFMAAlso in this segment is a conversation with Carson Lux, a physical therapist and Program Head in the Movement Performance Project at Athletico Physical Therapy. Carson shares his 30 years of experience after graduating from the University of Evansville in 1989. He played HS football, basketball, collegiate baseball, and studied Aikido. Carson subsequently has undergone multiple orthopedic surgeries as a result of his own athletic career and has a unique understanding of what athletes must endure to return to their sports and the current therapy techniques to speed injury rehabilitation.

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The Emotional Impact of Injuries

emotional impact of injuries

Dr. Cole and Steve Kashul talk with Tara Hackney PT, DPT, OCS, KTTP, a physical therapist with Athletico. Tara earned her Orthopedic Clinical Specialty (OCS) certification due to an interest in orthopedic rehabilitation. She holds certifications in Graston Technique, Kinesiotape, and FMS testing.

As much as we would like to prevent injuries, they do occur. In an ideal world, an injury would not disrupt our regular activities or participation in sport. But many times injuries lead to shifts in our regular activities. For many athletes, this injury can trigger an emotional and mental response.

Emotional responses that can occur after injury:

  • Sadness
  • Isolation
  • Irritation
  • Lack of motivation
  • Anger
  • Frustration
  • Changes in appetite
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Disengagement

There is no correct way for an athlete to respond to an injury; every athlete is an individual and their response will vary. It is important to note that the emotional response to injury may change throughout the course of healing. It starts at the time of the injury but continues throughout rehab, and into the return-to-play phase as well. The healthcare team should be aware of emotional responses and be on the lookout for athletes who may not have proper coping to these intense emotions.

How Can We Help Injured Athletes Emotionally During Recovery?  (related article)

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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Clinical Trial to Repair Articular Cartilage Defects of the Knee

Dr. Brian Cole talks with Chris Zlevor, a patient who experienced three knee surguries before participating in the Aesculap Novacart 3D Clinical Trial. This discussion covers the process of participation and followup experience as a patient in the study. Aesculap Biologics focuses on the manufacturing of tissue engineered products for the regeneration of diseased or damaged joint tissues.

A Phase 3 clinical trial is currently being conducted for NOVOCART 3D, a tissue engineered cell-based product designed to repair articular cartilage defects of the knee. If you believe you or your patients might qualify for one of our clinical trials or wish to be evaluated, please contact our research administrator, Kavita Ahuja, MD at (312) 563-2214 or kavita.ahuja@rushortho.com or inquire at your next visit.

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