Common Hand Injuries: Text Thumb; Little League Pitchers: Do’s & Don’ts; Importance of Sleep for Optimal Recovery

Episode 17.35 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:10): Dr. Nik Verma sitting in this week for Dr. Cole joins Steve andImage result for thumb overuse Nicole Kauppila from Athletico Physical Therapy to discuss Tech Thumb injury.

Each year as we approach the holidays, smartphones are listed as a top gift.  With use of smart phones – tech-related injuries called “tech-thumb” resulting from unnatural movements like constant texting are on the rise.

New smartphones often means even more time straining thumbs, in fact young adults spend a staggering one-third of their waking hours on smart phones. Nicole describes causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment for overuse injuries of the hand.


 Segment Two (11:46): Dr. Nik Verma, Head Team Physician for the Chicago White Sox talks with Steve about how to avoid overuse throwing injuries in young athletes; avoid training in one sport all year long, high pitch velocity and pitch counts that can cause damage from repetitive load on the growth plates of young athletes.

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Segment Three (20:14): Todd Sayer, PT from ATI Physical Therapy talks about the importance of sleep for optimal recovery; the correct supportive neutral sleep position; avoiding compressed shoulder joint in side sleepers. 

How you sleep dictates how you perform, so whether you are falling short on logging enough sleep each night or poor sleep posture is inhibiting a solid day’s performance, making a few simple changes can help to enable a good night’s rest and support your body’s ability to adapt and adjust.

Todd Sayer  is a Senior Regional Director with ATI. He has 18 years of clinical experience specializing in treatment outpatient orthopedic and sports medicine injuries as well as chronic pain and post-operative care.

Overcoming Sleep Challenges and Discomfort

Coming Back From Shoulder Separation

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D., President, Sideline Sports Doc, Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University

Key Points:

  • A “shoulder separation” is a different injury than a shoulder dislocation
  • The shoulder separation involves a sprain to the ligaments of a joint at the point of the shoulder near the end of the collarbone
  • We will often see these injuries when a player is tackled or falls to the ground on the point of the shoulder, with the arm at the player’s side
  • Most shoulder separations from sports injuries can successfully be treated without surgery

I’ve written recently about shoulder dislocation, a serious condition in which the ball portion of the shoulder (humerus) becomes completely dislodged from the socket. This week we’ll discuss a shoulder separation, another common shoulder injury. But first let’s clear up some terminology to avoid confusion.

A separated shoulder refers to an injury to the ligaments of the acromioclavicular joint (commonly known as the AC joint), which is the joint between the end of your collarbone and the upper part of your shoulder blade. It’s located near the point of the shoulder.

Most shoulder separations occur during some type of hard fall or contact, such as a quarterback being tackled on to his shoulder, or a cyclist falling and landing on his shoulder. When I see a hard fall to the ground I’ll be suspicious for either a shoulder separation or a broken collarbone if the athlete fell with the arm tucked in to the side, and I’m suspicious for a shoulder dislocation if the athlete fell on to the outstretched hand.

There are six types of shoulder separations. Types 1 and 2 are the most common ones we see in sports injuries and are treated without surgery. Type 3 injuries are also reasonably common, and most of these are treated without surgery (although there is some debate about early repair for the throwing shoulder of an elite athlete…). Types 4-6 are not seen very often in sports injuries and these will require surgery. I refer to these as “types” although some surgeons will call these “grades”.

  • Type 1 – The ligaments have a mild sprain without a tear.
  • Type 2 – The AC ligament tears, leading to a partial separation.
  • Type 3 – The AC ligament and other associated ligaments tear, leading to a complete separation.
  • Types 4-6 – These are complete separations, serious injuries often requiring urgent surgery. I have seen one type 4 separation in a D1 quarterback during my 23-year career.

Here are typical return to play times for the common types:

  • Type 1: You can usually return to play 2-3 weeks after the injury, depending on your sport and position. You should be comfortable, with full motion, normal strength, and ability to do sport specific motions. Treatment includes rest and anti-inflammatory medication.
  • Types 2 and 3: A Type 2 injury takes about 3-4 weeks to fully heal, and a type 3 injury takes about six to eight weeks to heal. We’ll almost always treat these without surgery, and we’ll use the same return to play criteria as indicated above for the Type 1 injury. If you’re in a collision sport (such as football) I’ll usually recommend you return to play with an AC joint pad to minimize the chance of another injury.

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Monitoring Training Metrics on Elite Athletes; Clavicle Fractures; Concussion & Youth Football Participation

Episode 17.24 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:23): Dr. Kevin Sprouse from Podium Sports Medicine describes the key elements in monitoring the unique biomechanical and physiologic variables widely applicable to any level of athlete who wishes to ensure that they are optimizing their overall health and performance.

Dr. Kevin Sprouse is a Knoxville native, now working with elite athletes and active individuals around the world. Trained and certified in both Emergency Medicine and Sports Medicine, he obtained his Bachelor’s degree in Exercise Science at Wake Forest University before attending medical school at the Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine at Virginia Tech.

He then completed his Emergency Medicine residency in New York City, where he was elected Chief Resident. Following residency, he attained a fellowship in Sports Medicine at the Steadman Hawkins Clinic in Greenville, SC.

The focus of his academic interests and practice has been the care of the endurance athlete, as well how exercise, diet, and movement effect the health and well-being of all active individuals. His patients have included professional and Olympic cyclists, runners and triathletes, and he now brings his experience and expertise in this field to Podium Sports Medicine.

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Segment Two (11:40): Dr. Cole and Steve talk about the causes, treatment and recovery for Clavicle Fractures.

A clavicle fracture is a break in the collarbone, one of the main bones in the shoulder. This type of fracture is fairly common—accounting for about 5 percent of all adult fractures. Most clavicle fractures occur when a fall onto the shoulder or an outstretched arm puts enough pressure on the bone that it snaps or breaks. A broken collarbone can be very painful and can make it hard to move your arm.

Most clavicle fractures can be treated by wearing a sling to keep the arm and shoulder from moving while the bone heals. With some clavicle fractures, however, the pieces of bone move far out of place when the injury occurs. For these more complicated fractures, surgery may be needed to realign the collarbone.

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Segment Three (17:00): Coach Paul O’Toole, Commissioner of the St. Raphael Youth Football Program in Naperville IL, talks with Dr. Cole and Steve about the decrease of football enrollment due to risk of concussion; technique, program and protocol changes to make the game safer for young players; addition of trainers onsite at all games.

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Related article: Counsel patients, parents on concussion risks in football