Ask the Doctor!

This regular segment of ‘Ask the Doctor’ addresses questions submitted by Sports Medicine Weekly followers. Dr. Brian Cole from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush will be discussing:

  • Surgical treatment for torn MCL.
  • Tests to analyze the condition of your knee.
  • Treatment and recovery for poor neck posture.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

If you have a question to be addressed on an upcoming show, please click here to submit your question.

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Common Wrestling Injuries and Treatment Options

common wrestling injuries and treatment options

By Tara Hackney, PT, DPT, OCS, KTTP for Athletico Physical Therapy

Wrestling is one of the world’s oldest sports. Since wrestling season is getting underway, let’s take a quick moment to look at some common injuries that can impact wrestlers:

Knee Injuries

Prepatellar bursitis

  • What: Prepatellar bursitis is inflammation of the bursa, which is a fluid filled sac located in front of the kneecap. In wrestling this area is constantly hitting the mat.
  • Symptoms: Symptoms of prepatellar bursitis can include sharp pain and swelling of the kneecap area.
  • Treatment: Treatment can include anti-inflammatory medications, ice, rest and the use of knee pads by the wrestler.
  • Prevention: Wrestlers can wear knee pads to decrease the contact of the knee with the mat, which is aggravating to the bursa.

Knee ligament injuries

  • What: Commonly injured knee ligaments in wrestling include the medial collateral ligament (MCL) or lateral collateral ligament (LCL) of the knee, located on the middle and outside of the knee respectively. These injuries can occur in wrestling when the leg is twisted outward from the body.
  • Symptoms: Pain, swelling of the knee, difficulty putting full weight on the knee, and pain with bending and straightening the knee are all symptoms of knee ligament injuries.
  • Treatment: Treatment of a mild sprain of the ligament can include RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). More severe injuries are treated by a physician, however surgery is rarely indicated. Physical therapy can help recovery and return to sport after a MCL or LCL injury.
  • Prevention: Maintaining good strength in both the quads and hamstrings can help strengthen the knee and decrease the risk of injury. Also flexibility of these same muscle groups will help with preventing injury.

Shoulder Injuries

Shoulder Separation

  • What: A shoulder separation can occur when a wrestler takes a blow to the shoulder or falls onto the shoulder. The separation is due to ligaments being torn that help the clavicle (collar bone) stay stable with the rest of the shoulder. Usually after this injury the clavicle rests in a higher position.
  • Symptoms: A visible step off over the shoulder where the clavicle rests higher is common, as well as pain over that region. A wrestler may also have less movement of the shoulder with overhead reaching.
  • Treatment: Shoulder separations have varying severity levels. For minor injuries, physical therapy and taping can be used for treatment. A larger grade separation may require surgery to correct.
  • Prevention: Since a separation is typically a traumatic event, it can be difficult to prevent. However if a wrestler has good flexibility and well-balanced strength in the shoulder prior to injury, it can make recovering from an injury easier.

Shoulder Dislocation/Subluxation

  • What: Dislocations and subluxations occur when there is an impact to the arm where the arm is rotated and away from the body, causing the joint to separate. In wrestling, this can be a fall onto an outstretched arm.
  • Symptoms: If the shoulder goes out but comes back into the joint on its own, that is a subluxation. If the shoulder does not go back on its own, the wrestler needs to see a doctor to have the dislocation corrected. Pain, swelling, and difficulty moving the arm are all common symptoms after these injuries.
  • Treatment: Imaging is recommended after this injury to assess for damage to the ligaments and muscles of the shoulder. Physical therapy can help to strengthen muscles and decrease pain after this injury.
  • Prevention: If a wrestler is falling, they can try to keep their arms close to the body to prevent the fall onto the outstretched arm.

Neck Injury

Cervical Sprain/Strain

  • What: A cervical sprain or strain can occur when there is a sudden fall or impact with the mat or opponent in wrestling. Usually the head is quickly, and possibly forcibly, moved from one position to another.
  • Symptoms: The neck muscles may feel like they are in spasm. Difficulty and pain with moving the head and neck are common. Headaches may also occur due to muscle tension.
  • Treatment: Heat, ice, anti-inflammatory medications and physical therapy can be used to help decrease the muscle tension and symptoms of a cervical sprain or strain. These treatments can also improve range of movement of the head and neck.
  • Prevention: Try to avoid the quick movements into extreme stretched positions of the neck. Warm up prior to a match can include neck stretches to prepare the muscles for the possible movements that can occur during wrestling.

If you are a wrestler who has suffered an injury, schedule a free assessment at a nearby Athletico clinic so our experts can help you recover.

SCHEDULE A FREE ASSESSMENT

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Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet; Stem Cell Therapy: Myths and Misconceptions; Treatment and Prevention of “Text Neck”

Episode 16.23 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Certified Integrated Health Coach, Karen Malkin discusses the health med-dietbenefits of the Mediterranean Diet.  This anti-inflammatory diet promoted by Andrew Weil, MD, helps counteract chronic inflammation, and prevent age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Health benefits of an anti-inflammatory diet include lower LDL and total cholesterol and long-term weight loss without calorie counting. Key foods on the Mediterranean diet include 5-9 servings each day of phytonutrient containing vegetables and fruit and cooked Asian mushrooms to support immune function.

The anti-inflammatory food plan encourages fiber- rich beans and legumes; fish loaded in Omega 3’s such as wild salmon; whole soy foods such as tofu, tempeh; healthy fats such as olive oil, nuts, seeds, ground flax seed and avocados.  Of course, we can’t forget a small amount of dark chocolate and red wine, plus 2-4 cups of green tea each day, all loaded with antioxidants.


Segment Two: Dr. Cole discusses stem cell therapy and its use for elite athletes andstem-cell
the weekend warrior; definition, benefits, myths and misconceptions; the procedure and current research.

Manipulating stem cells from a patient’s bone marrow near the site of the defect in order to encourage cartilage growth and regeneration is an approach that could potentially be used to avoid surgical intervention.

Ongoing clinical trials and research efforts


Segment Three: Megan Randich, PT, DPT, ATC, Cert. MDT and Facility Manager from Athletico discusses “Text Neck”: Causes, symptoms, treatment and prevention.

"Text neck"

More teens than ever are complaining of “text neck,” or back and neck pain that can only be explained by the strain on the body caused by constant viewing of hand-held technology.

“We have teens experiencing the same shoulder, neck and back pain usually felt by people 30 years older,” said Megan Randich, a physical therapist and facility manager for Athletico in Westchester. “They shouldn’t be experiencing those issues.”

Randich said spine specialists also are seeing evidence of strain from cellphone, tablet and laptop use in high school athletes who complain that they don’t have the normal range of motion — or feel pain when trying to throw a baseball, strike a football stance or perform in other sporting activities.

More on ‘Text Neck’ article with Megan Randich plus video

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