Juvenile Arthritis

Juvenile arthritis is the term used to describe arthritis in children younger than 16 years. Juvenile arthritis is twice as common in girls as boys and the most common type is juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is an autoimmune disorder affecting the joints of the knee, hands and feet. It causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and feeling of warmth in the joints. The probable causes of JIA include autoimmune condition, genetic factors, and environmental factors.

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TISSUE RECIPIENT FINDS STRENGTH ONCE MORE

KATRIN, RECIPIENT OF ACHILLES TENDON ALLOGRAFT

Katrin describes her injury as affecting her life in every way. The normally active athlete was playing soccer when her ACL partially tore. Not realizing the extent of the injury, Katrin continued to play sports despite the increasing pain.

“During my first surgery, a huge piece of my medial meniscus was removed and it turned out that my ACL was completely torn. Ten months later I had to have my ACL replaced in order to prevent further injuries to my knee,” said Katrin. It was before her second surgery when Katrin realized an achilles tendon from a deceased donor would be saving her knee.

Describing  herself as “flushed with drugs,” the impact of what the doctor told her didn’t settle in until later. While recovering, Katrin was focused on healing to the best of her ability. Though she describes the process as painful, this period also gave her time to reflect on her choice of using donated tissue. “I was thinking about this a lot when I made my decision to choose a tissue transplant from a deceased donor.

“I feel grateful that tissue transplants are available and that there are people who make the decision to become a donor,” Katrin said. Three weeks after surgery, Katrin began walking without crutches. Nine weeks after that, she was able to run again. “I feel very blessed to be able to continue my active lifestyle.

There is not one day when I exercise that I am not grateful for being able to do the things that my heart desires to do such as running in the morning and snowboarding on the weekends,” said Katrin. Because of the gift she received, Katrin is now an advocate for organ and tissue donaton.

“I am a registered donor and always strongly believed that this was how I could enhance and save many people’s lives when I am no longer here,” said Katrin. Though Katrin does not know the family of her donor, she often thinks of them and hopes they know what a tremendous gift they gave her.

“I know thank you is not nearly enough to show how grateful I am for their decision to donate. I want them to know that there is not one day when I start running in the morning that I do not think about how grateful I am to be able to live life to the fullest. So again, thank you.”


First-Ever National Study Shows Majority of Paddle Tennis Players Sustained Injuries Related to Playing

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The first-ever national study of platform (paddle) tennis injuries revealed 66 percent of paddle tennis players say they sustained an injury from playing the game. The study also found that of the platform tennis players reporting an injury, more than half sustained two or more.

The most common conditions reported were injuries to the shin/calf (21%), knee (16%), elbow (16%), ankle (13%) and shoulder (10%). Sixty percent of the injuries were caused by overuse and 40 percent were due to an incident that occurred during play. The study, which involved an online survey of American Platform Tennis Association players nationwide, was coordinated by Dr. Leda Ghannad, a sports medicine physician at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, with approval from the internal review board at Rush University Medical Center. More than 1,000 players responded to the survey.

“We knew it was a high-injury sport based on the number of paddle patients we treat,” admits Dr. Ghannad. “But until now, there wasn’t any research that proved this. Paddle tennis requires a mixture of speed, agility and quick bursts of energy, which makes athletes more susceptible to getting hurt. Many players are also middle-aged ‘weekend warriors’ who don’t strengthen or stretch their muscles and ligaments in between games or practices.”

Paddle tennis is similar to tennis but is played outside in the winter on a small, elevated court surrounded by a screen. Courts are heated from underneath to clear snow and ice. Most participants are between the ages of 40 and 65.


“Platform tennis is a great way to get exercise in the winter and I don’t want to discourage anyone from playing it,” explains Dr. Ghannad. “However, because of the high injury rate, it is critical to incorporate warm up exercises and prevention strategies into your routine.”


If you suffer an injury from platform tennis, call the MOR platform injury appointment line:  855-603-4141.

CHICAGO SPORTS MEDICINE SYMPOSIUM

August 3 – August 6

Course Description

This course has been designed to present knee, shoulder, elbow, hip and sports medicine ailments and the most advanced treatment options from nationally and internationally recognized orthopaedic surgeons. Live surgery broadcasts, workshops, case presentations and panel discussions will offer the participants the opportunity to interact with faculty and learn the most current solutions to these challenging problems.

Target Audience

Orthopaedic surgeons, primary care practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, athletic trainers, physical therapists and other healthcare professionals whose scope of practice includes sports medicine.

Objectives


Course Directors

Dr. Anthony RomeoAnthony A. Romeo, M.D.

Sports Medicine Orthopedic Surgeon

Professor, Director, Section of Shoulder & Elbow, Rush University Medical Center

nikhil vermaNikhil N. Verma, M.D.

Sports Medicine Orthopedic Surgeon

Professor and Director, Division of Sports Medicine, Fellowship Director, Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedics, Rush University Medical Center, Team Physician, Chicago White Sox/Chicago Bulls


Course Chairmen: Cartilage Restoration

Dr. Brian ColeBrian J. Cole, M.D., M.B.A.

Sports Medicine Orthopedic Surgeon

Associate Chairman and Professor, Department of Orthopedics, Chairman, Department of Surgery, Rush OPH, Shoulder, Elbow and Knee Surgery, Section Head, Cartilage Restoration Center at Rush

adam yankeAdam B. Yanke, M.D. 

Sports Medicine Orthopedic Surgeon

Assistant Professor Department of Orthopedics, Assistant Director Cartilage Restoration Center, Rush University Medical Center


Foundation for Orthopaedic Research and Education (FORE)