Hip Dysplasia  in Young Female Athletes; The NBA Combine; Why we were Skinnier in the 80’s

Episode 17.12 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:20): Dr. Joel Williams from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush describes Hip Dysplasia, symptoms, treatment alternatives and who might be more prone to Image result for hip dysplasiahaving the condition.

Hip dysplasia, a condition where the hip socket doesn’t fully cover the ball portion of the femur, resulting in instability, is rising in young active women, who have probably had it since birth. Recent research shows that receiving care early is vital to a successful treatment experience for hip dysplasia patients.  Doing so may help patients delay or avoid having a total hip replacement (arthroplasty).

Dr. Joel C. Williams brings seven years of training and passion for complex fracture care, post-traumatic deformity, pelvis and acetabular surgery, and complex hip surgery to Rush University Medical Center.

Dr. Williams is a native of Michigan and graduated from the Michigan State University Honors Program. He then attended medical school at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. There, he was awarded a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship and spent a year doing basic science research.

Dr. Williams’ surgical training began at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, where he completed his residency in orthopedic surgery. While a resident, he did a research fellowship and was awarded a grant from the Orthopaedic Trauma Association to investigate fracture healing. Additionally, he was awarded a traveling fellowship from the AO Trauma Foundation to study orthopedic traumatology in Chur, Switzerland with Dr. Cristoph Sommer. More…

Learn more about hip disorders at Hips for Life and download the Prevention Techniques Brochure

Hips for Life


Segment Two (12:26): Dr. Cole as head team physician for the Chicago Bulls discusses the various challenges related to the NBA Draft Combine and how they are dealt with in what is described as a complicated and chaotic process.

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Segment Three (17:09): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks about why it’s harder for adults today to maintain the same weight as those 20 to 30 years ago did, even at the same levels of food intake and exercise; how to maintain a healthy microbiome/weight and how we can avoid the obesity epidemic.

  • People are exposed to more chemicals that might be weight-gain inducing. Pesticides, flame retardants, and the substances in food packaging might all be altering our hormonal processes and tweaking the way our bodies put on and maintain weight.
  • The use of prescription drugs has risen dramatically since the ‘70s and ‘80s. Prozac, the first blockbuster SSRI, came out in 1988. Antidepressants are now one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S., and many of them have been linked to weight gain.
  • The microbiomes of Americans might have somehow changed between the 1980s and now. It’s well known that some types of gut bacteria make a person more prone to weight gain and obesity.
Karen Malkin is certified as an Integrative Health Coach and Lifestyle Practitioner and a Certified Eating Psychology Coach. Karen has a private practice in Glencoe, Illinois.  She passionately serves on the Board of Directors for the Environmental Working Group, the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Spiral Sun Ventures and Gardeneer.

CHICAGO SPORTS MEDICINE SYMPOSIUM

August 3 – August 6

Course Description

This course has been designed to present knee, shoulder, elbow, hip and sports medicine ailments and the most advanced treatment options from nationally and internationally recognized orthopaedic surgeons. Live surgery broadcasts, workshops, case presentations and panel discussions will offer the participants the opportunity to interact with faculty and learn the most current solutions to these challenging problems.

Target Audience

Orthopaedic surgeons, primary care practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, athletic trainers, physical therapists and other healthcare professionals whose scope of practice includes sports medicine.

Objectives


Course Directors

Dr. Anthony RomeoAnthony A. Romeo, M.D.

Sports Medicine Orthopedic Surgeon

Professor, Director, Section of Shoulder & Elbow, Rush University Medical Center

nikhil vermaNikhil N. Verma, M.D.

Sports Medicine Orthopedic Surgeon

Professor and Director, Division of Sports Medicine, Fellowship Director, Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedics, Rush University Medical Center, Team Physician, Chicago White Sox/Chicago Bulls


Course Chairmen: Cartilage Restoration

Dr. Brian ColeBrian J. Cole, M.D., M.B.A.

Sports Medicine Orthopedic Surgeon

Associate Chairman and Professor, Department of Orthopedics, Chairman, Department of Surgery, Rush OPH, Shoulder, Elbow and Knee Surgery, Section Head, Cartilage Restoration Center at Rush

adam yankeAdam B. Yanke, M.D. 

Sports Medicine Orthopedic Surgeon

Assistant Professor Department of Orthopedics, Assistant Director Cartilage Restoration Center, Rush University Medical Center


Foundation for Orthopaedic Research and Education (FORE)

7 Common Causes of Hip Pain

Who has hip pain — and why — can be surprising

Hip pain is all too common, with everyone from recent college graduates to grandparents at risk.
But why you are suffering can be difficult to pinpoint. To get the proper diagnosis, the best clues are the type of pain and where it is located.

Here, Shane Nho, MD, MS, a sports medicine specialist at Rush University Medical Center and director of the Hip Preservation Center, looks at seven common causes of hip pain — and some might surprise you.

1. Core muscle injury (a.k.a. sports hernia or athletic pubalgia).

If you feel pain in your groin area, it might be a core muscle injury, such as a strain or tear of muscles or other soft tissues in the lower abdomen.

This injury is quite common in weekend warriors — especially those who play sports involving a lot of extreme twisting and turning, but who aren’t as athletically conditioned as they need to be.

Treatment: Resting the affected muscles for several weeks can help. You may also require surgery to repair the torn muscle by a general surgeon.

2. Bursitis.

If it hurts on the outside of your hip, thigh and/or buttocks, you can probably blame bursitis — the inflammation of the pillow-like fluid sacs that keep tendons and muscles from rubbing directly against bone.

“Though walking for a long time or climbing stairs can make it worse, bursitis usually is not associated with activity-related pain. It just hurts day to day,” Nho says. “Even lying on that side when you sleep can make it hurt.”

Bursitis becomes more common as we age, and is especially prevalent in people over 60.

Treatment: At home, try rest, putting ice compresses on the area and taking anti-inflammatory and pain medications. Sometimes, your doctor may give you a cortisone injection to reduce inflammation.

3. Tendonitis.

If you’re active, and your hip flexor (the group of muscles that lets you bring your knee and leg toward your body) or groin are tender when you touch or move them, you may have tendonitis.

“Straining or over-using tendons — the cords that attach the muscle to the bone — creates repeated minor injuries that eventually lead to muscular imbalances in the hip,” Nho explains. “People who do very specific activities over and over, like kicking a soccer ball, can be at risk for this severe pain.”

Treatment: Treatment options are similar to bursitis.

4. Labral tears.

The labrum is the ring of cartilage that surrounds the hip socket and ensures the ball of the thighbone stays in place. When it tears — often in athletes and ballerinas — it causes pain in the hip or groin and limits movement, creating a sensation that the hip is locking, catching or clicking.

“The pain tends not to go away,” Nho says. This injury is common in people with anatomic abnormalities that make the hip too shallow or hips with impingement (see below), or in those who previously injured their hips.

Treatment: A type of minimally invasive surgery is used to repair the labrum and shave down the misshaped bone. This procedure corrects the hip’s alignment, relieving pain and protecting the joint.

5. Gynecological or pelvic floor issues.

The pain you feel in your hip could actually be coming from elsewhere in your pelvis. “The pelvis contains many systems, and everything is jammed in there, close together. Sometimes, there can be confusion about where the pain is coming from,” Nho says.

If the pain is limited to your groin and coincides with ovulation or your period, the cause could be endometriosis or fibroids rather than a problem with the hip. Urological and gastrointestinal issues, such as gastroenteritis and prostate cancer, could also cause pain that’s easily mistaken for a hip injury.

Treatment: Visit your primary care physician for a complete workup. Depending on the diagnosis, they may refer you to another specialist, such as a gynecologist or gastroenterologist, for treatment.

6. Hip impingement.

Nho treats hip pain in many younger people who do high-intensity athletics, such as Tough Mudder races, CrossFit or barre classes.

“These intense activities can actually cause the hip bones to fuse in an abnormal shape and limit movement,” Nho says. This is called hip impingement, or femoral acetabular impingement (FAI). Not only does it hurt, but it also increases the risk of premature osteoarthritis.

Treatment: Physical therapy can help and is often the first line of treatment. Ultimately, surgery to move the hipbones to unlock them might be required.

7. Osteoarthritis.

This is a very common cause of a daily, dull pain in the hip. With osteoarthritis, your joints become stiff and swollen due to inflammation and breakdown of cartilage, causing pain and deformity.

Recent studies show that osteoarthritis results when the hip bones are not formed perfectly, making them not fit together neatly. This eventually causes them to rub against each other, Nho says.

Being highly active — running marathons or playing high-impact sports like basketball — can increase your chances of getting osteoarthritis. Add aging, obesity or traumatic injury and the pain can become disabling.

Treatment: Along with rest, ice, steroids and over-the-counter pain and anti-inflammatory medications, more aggressive treatments include stem cell therapy and surgery, from hip resurfacing to total hip replacement.

Keep your hips healthy

To help prevent hip pain, Nho suggests the following:

  • Control your weight
  • Stretch or do yoga regularly
  • Strengthen your core
  • Get annual check-ups
  • Exercise regularly, but make sure to do exercises that are appropriate for your age and physical condition

If your hip pain is intense or long lasting, visit your primary care physician. You might then be referred to a specialist for a closer look.

Rush University Medical Center

Advancements in Hip Replacement Surgery; Growth Plate Injuries in Young Athletes

Episode 17.10 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.new host image


Segment One(01:56): Dr. Richard Berger from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about the growing number of athletes anddr berger younger patients undergoing hip replacement and his unique procedure for doing hip replacements along with expectations for outcome and recovery. Dr. Berger has pioneered minimally invasive hip and knee replacement, allowing patients to recover faster with less pain than with traditional hip and knee replacement surgery.

His degree in mechanical engineering from MIT has helped him design specialized instruments which allow the surgery to be done without cutting any muscle, tendons, or ligaments. These advances allow most of Dr. Berger’s patients to walk independently and leave the hospital the day of surgery. His mechanical engineering background has also helped him to design gender-specific implants that fit and perform better for active patients.

Find more information about Dr. Berger and the hip injury treatment and prevention program by Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush and the Illinois Athletic Trainers Association at Hips for Life.

Hips for Life


Segment Two (15:10): Dr. Cole and Steve discuss growth plate injuries in young athletes. The growth plate, also known as the epiphyseal plate or physis, is the area of growing tissue near the end of the long bones in children and adolescents. Each long bone has at least two growth plates: one at each end. The growth plate determines the future length and shape of the mature bone. When growth is complete–sometime during adolescence–the growth plates close and are replaced by solid bone.Related image

These injuries occur in children and adolescents. The growth plate is the weakest area of the growing skeleton, weaker than the nearby ligaments and tendons that connect bones to other bones and muscles. In a growing child, a serious injury to a joint is more likely to damage a growth plate than the ligaments that stabilize the joint. An injury that would cause a sprain in an adult can be associated with a growth plate injury in a child.

Injuries to the growth plate are fractures. They comprise 15 percent of all childhood fractures. They occur twice as often in boys as in girls, with the greatest incidence among 14- to 16-year-old boys and 11- to 13-year-old girls. Older girls experience these fractures less often because their bodies mature at an earlier age than boys. As a result, their bones finish growing sooner, and their growth plates are replaced by stronger, solid bone.

While growth plate injuries are caused by an acute event, such as a fall or a blow to a limb, chronic injuries can also result from overuse. For example, a gymnast who practices for hours on the uneven bars, a long-distance runner, or a baseball pitcher perfecting his curve ball can all have growth plate injuries.