MOR Physicians Help Patient Get Back to Active Lifestyle

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Rob Satek, 46, a resident of Michigan and Florida, refers to himself as a ‘hard sell’ when it comes to doctors. “I like to do things my way, even when it comes to my medical care,” he explains.

However, three orthopedic surgeries in 14 months changed his mind.

Satek, who has been snowmobiling, riding motorcycles and racing motocross and speed boats for most of his life, recently found himself in so much back pain that he decided it was time to sell his bikes and boats. He was forced to use a wheelchair in some cases just to get around. “No one thinks about the wear and tear on the body when you’re doing those sports,” he explained. “Especially not me.”

Reluctantly, at the suggestion of a friend, Satek visited Frank Phillips, MD, a minimally invasive spine expert at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush (MOR). After imaging, a thorough exam and extensive conversation with Satek, Dr. Phillips recommended a spinal fusion to relieve his pain. Satek agreed, underwent the L5 to S1 fusion surgery and was thrilled to be walking again without back pain a week after surgery. “I’m not an emotional guy, but one of my most emotional moments was when I realized that Dr. Phillips had fixed my back,” he says.

During a follow up appointment, Dr. Phillips noticed something unusual about Satek’s shoulder and asked him how long it had been hurting. “I couldn’t believe it,” Satek says. “I never mentioned my shoulder to him, but he could tell it was bothering me. I actually hadn’t been able to pull the starter on my snowmobile for some time.”

That same day, Dr. Phillips introduced Satek to MOR partner, Dr. Nikhil Verma, a sports medicine surgeon who diagnosed Satek with a torn rotator cuff and recommended surgery to relieve his pain. Once again, Satek agreed and not long after surgery, he was back in the gym. “I really like the way these doctors collaborated about my care,” Satek says. “They really understand the human body and how all of its parts work together.”

One year later, Satek begain experiencing pain again, this time in his foot. He was having trouble walking several blocks, so he called his friends at MOR once again. He met Dr. Kamran Hamid, a foot and ankle specialist, who diagnosed him with a bone spur and recommended surgery to remove it. He agreed, but warned Dr. Hamid that he had a vacation planned post-surgery that he didn’t want to miss. Three weeks after surgery, Satek left for Florida and Dr. Hamid agreed to monitor his care unconventionally. “I sent Dr. Hamid regular texts with photos and updates about my foot,” he explains. “I described what was going on and he replied with any modifications that he felt were necessary.”

Today, Satek is back to riding snowmobiles, motorcycles and enjoying an active lifestyle without any pain.


“I’m not a professional athlete but I run my life like one,” he explains. “I like that the MOR doctors treat the pros. If they can get those guys back into the game, they are the only ones I want to get me back to my active life.”


 

Foot & Ankle Allografts; The NBA Combine; Spectator Sports & Long Flight Stretches

Episode 17.06 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (02:36): Dr. Brett Sachs for AlloSource discusses the most common uses of allograft transplants in treating foot and ankle defects; the evolution and new innovations in treatments; ongoing stem cell research at AlloSource.

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Dr. Sachs is a board-certified foot and ankle surgeon and part owner of Rocky Mountain Foot & Ankle Center. Dr. Sachs studied biology at the University of Maryland and completed his Doctor of Podiatric Medicine degree at Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine. He completed a 3-year podiatric surgical residency at Presbyterian/St. Luke’s Medical Center in Denver, Colorado, followed by an orthopedic trauma residency at Kaiser Permanente.

For More Information Please Visit AlloSource.org


Segment Two (11:21): Dr. Cole talks with Steve about wrapping up the end of season with the Chicago Bulls, overview of injuries, off-season activities and the 2017 NBA Combine.


 Segment Three (19:44): Anne Bierman PT, DPT, SCS from Athletico talks about the importance of stretching and posture while at spectator sports and during long flights. The combination of cramped flights and sitting for hours on end during games often leads to back pain and muscle soreness for fans. What are the signs of injury and muscle strain from sedentary activity that you should be aware of. 

Anne Marie Bierman (“Anny”) received her Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science, MPT, and DPT all through Saint Louis University.  At SLU, she was an All-Conference and All-Region soccer player, and Female Athlete of the Year in 2004.  She is a board-certified clinical specialist in sports physical therapy and certified in Astym.  Anny represents the Eastern Central District of the IPTA on both Nominating Committee and as a State Assembly Representative.

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Achilles Tendon Tear Repair

The achilles tendon is often injured during sports resulting in an inflammatory condition called tendonitis which is characterized by swelling and pain. The tendon ruptures because of weakened tendons due to advanced age or from sudden bursts of activity during sports. The classic symptom of an Achilles Tendon rupture is the inability to rise up on your toes.

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Featured Body Part: Foot

By ATIPT

Our foot and ankle complex needs to be both dynamic and stable to allow for us to walkFeatured Body Part: Foot without stressing other areas in the body. The ankle may seem like a simple joint, but there are actually four bones that combine to provide the stability and motion necessary – tibia, fibular, talus, and calcaneus. The rest of the foot consists of multiple smaller bones that each must be able to withstand the movement and stress placed on it by the weight of our body. Your ankle is also an integral part of your daily function, as it is responsible for your ability to drive a car, climb stairs, and squat. If you suffer an injury to your foot/ankle it will likely become increasingly difficult to perform your normal activities without pain. The more knowledge we have regarding prevention and common causes of injuries, the better our chances are to avoid future injury.

Common Causes
Unfortunately, with the complexity of the foot/ankle joints it is often difficult to isolate a singular cause of injury. As with other body parts, increasing age leads to increased risk of injury from general wear and tear. After the ankle is injured there is a high likelihood that you can suffer another injury due to remaining deficits and/or poor healing.

  • Overuse (Chronic) Injuries – With age and use cartilage can wear down and the ligaments, muscles, and tendons can become damaged.
  • Sudden (Acute) Injuries  – During a fall or other injury, the bones of the foot/ankle can be fractured.  You can also have ligament tears and ruptures of the tendons.

Common Conditions
Foot/ankle pain can be caused by any one of these common conditions:

  • Adult Acquired Flat Feet (Fallen Arches) – Fallen arch, or flatfoot, is known medically as pes planus. This is characterized as a loss in arch height in the foot. There are many causes of this disorder, but among the most common is decreased muscular strength. The muscles in the foot and ankle are required to help support the arch and if the weaken the arch can collapse
  • Bone Fracture – There are multiple bones in the foot/ankle that can break and each needs to be managed differently. Most will require a period of not putting weight through the foot to allow for healing.
  • Metatarsalgia – Athletes who run and jump a lot may be susceptible to metatarsalgia, a type of foot injury that results in pain and inflammation in the ball of the foot.
  • Plantar Fasciitis – Affecting nearly 2 million Americans each year, Plantar Fasciitis is when there is an inflammation of the thick band of ligament that extends from the bottom of the heel to the toes (primarily the big toe).
  • Calcaneal Bursitis – In the heel, bursitis may cause bruise-like pain mostly on the bottom of the heel, but also at the back of the heel. This pain is most often felt at the end of the day, especially for people who spend much of their time on their feet.

Injury Prevention
Kurt Gengenbacher, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, CSCS a Regional Director of Clinical Excellence, gives us some tips to help prevent and rehabilitate foot/ankle injuries:

  • Stay Flexible – Make sure to stretch your calves daily. Hold those stretches for at least 30 seconds and repeat 2-3 times.
  • Keep Your Foot Strong – Focus on functionally strengthening your foot.  The foot must be able to assist in stabilizing the body while standing, so the best exercises are often in a standing position.  Try to perform appropriate balancing tasks, standing toe crunches, heel raises, and toe raises.
  • Avoid Overtraining – Make sure you vary your exercises and don’t always do the same thing. If you have pain after exercising, stop the activity, rest, ice and elevate your leg.

Rehabilitation
If you have pain in your foot/ankle that isn’t going away, rehabilitation is a great step to take to improve your functionality. During rehabilitation:

  • A Strong Foot Is A Healthy Foot – Working on strength in the small muscles of the foot (intrinsics) can help your ability to walk barefoot and on uneven surfaces.
  • Be Balanced – Work on dynamic balance exercises to improve your proprioception and ability to stay upright.
  • Don’t Let Tightness Be Your Achilles Heel – Stretching your ankles can help to improve your ability to go down stairs and squat.
  • Stay On Your Toes – Strengthening of your calf muscles can help to improve your ability to walk, run, and climb stairs.
  • Wear Proper Footwear – It is important to provide appropriate support to your foot.

When weighing your treatment options for foot pain and injuries, consider physicalATI 300x250 therapy. Physical therapy offers a wide variety of treatment options including strengthening, stretching, and sustainable home exercise programs. Stop in or call any ATI location for a complimentary injury screen or to learn more about how physical therapy can help you overcome your foot pain.

Put your best foot forward with ATI!