MOR Physicians Help Patient Get Back to Active Lifestyle

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Rob Satek, 46, a resident of Michigan and Florida, refers to himself as a ‘hard sell’ when it comes to doctors. “I like to do things my way, even when it comes to my medical care,” he explains.

However, three orthopedic surgeries in 14 months changed his mind.

Satek, who has been snowmobiling, riding motorcycles and racing motocross and speed boats for most of his life, recently found himself in so much back pain that he decided it was time to sell his bikes and boats. He was forced to use a wheelchair in some cases just to get around. “No one thinks about the wear and tear on the body when you’re doing those sports,” he explained. “Especially not me.”

Reluctantly, at the suggestion of a friend, Satek visited Frank Phillips, MD, a minimally invasive spine expert at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush (MOR). After imaging, a thorough exam and extensive conversation with Satek, Dr. Phillips recommended a spinal fusion to relieve his pain. Satek agreed, underwent the L5 to S1 fusion surgery and was thrilled to be walking again without back pain a week after surgery. “I’m not an emotional guy, but one of my most emotional moments was when I realized that Dr. Phillips had fixed my back,” he says.

During a follow up appointment, Dr. Phillips noticed something unusual about Satek’s shoulder and asked him how long it had been hurting. “I couldn’t believe it,” Satek says. “I never mentioned my shoulder to him, but he could tell it was bothering me. I actually hadn’t been able to pull the starter on my snowmobile for some time.”

That same day, Dr. Phillips introduced Satek to MOR partner, Dr. Nikhil Verma, a sports medicine surgeon who diagnosed Satek with a torn rotator cuff and recommended surgery to relieve his pain. Once again, Satek agreed and not long after surgery, he was back in the gym. “I really like the way these doctors collaborated about my care,” Satek says. “They really understand the human body and how all of its parts work together.”

One year later, Satek begain experiencing pain again, this time in his foot. He was having trouble walking several blocks, so he called his friends at MOR once again. He met Dr. Kamran Hamid, a foot and ankle specialist, who diagnosed him with a bone spur and recommended surgery to remove it. He agreed, but warned Dr. Hamid that he had a vacation planned post-surgery that he didn’t want to miss. Three weeks after surgery, Satek left for Florida and Dr. Hamid agreed to monitor his care unconventionally. “I sent Dr. Hamid regular texts with photos and updates about my foot,” he explains. “I described what was going on and he replied with any modifications that he felt were necessary.”

Today, Satek is back to riding snowmobiles, motorcycles and enjoying an active lifestyle without any pain.


“I’m not a professional athlete but I run my life like one,” he explains. “I like that the MOR doctors treat the pros. If they can get those guys back into the game, they are the only ones I want to get me back to my active life.”


 

Dynamic Stretching – Series II Videos on Proper Form

This is the second of 3 series on Dynamic Stretch Videos Created by Emily Haglage, PT, DPT from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush

Research seems to lean towards dynamic stretching as the most beneficial form of stretching prior to any type of exercise or sport routine. In fact, most studies found that it was beneficial to perform dynamic stretching in order to reverse negative effects of static stretching. One researcher group discovered, “ Athletes in sports requiring [leg] power should use dynamic stretching techniques in warm-up to enhance flexibility while improving performance”.

Read more: To Stretch or Not To Stretch: Should you waste your time? and Dynamic Stretching – Series I Videos on Proper Form.


Dynamic Stretch 4: Hip Rotator stretches– use this exercise to open up your hips to allow for more movement as well as decreased risk of hip and low back strain.


Dynamic Stretch 5: Hip Rotator stretches– use this exercise to open up your hips to allow for more movement as well as decreased risk of hip and low back strain.


Dynamic Stretch 6: Hip Rotator stretches– use this exercise to open up your hips to allow for more movement as well as decreased risk of hip and low back strain.


Emily_Haglage.jpgEmily Haglage is a graduate of Saint Louis University where she received her bachelor’s of science degree in exercise science and doctorate in physical therapy. She treats a variety of orthopedic injuries with special interest in knee injuries including patellofemoral pain, meniscus injuries, ligamentous injuries, arthritis and post-operative total knee replacements. She enjoys working closely with athletes by performing Functional Sports Assessments (FSAs) which give physicians more assurance that their patients are safe to return to sports such as basketball, football, soccer, tennis and hockey.

Dynamic Stretching – Series I Videos on Proper Form

This is the first of 3 series on Dynamic Stretch Videos Created by Emily Haglage, PT, DPT from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush

Research seems to lean towards dynamic stretching as the most beneficial form of stretching prior to any type of exercise or sport routine. In fact, most studies found that it was beneficial to perform dynamic stretching in order to reverse negative effects of static stretching. One researcher group discovered, “ Athletes in sports requiring [leg] power should use dynamic stretching techniques in warm-up to enhance flexibility while improving performance”. Read more: To Stretch or Not To Stretch: Should you waste your time?


Dynamic Stretch: High Knees– use this exercise to stretch your psoas (hip flexor muscle) if you are dealing with any hip or low back issues.


Dynamic Stretch: Hamstring Walk– use this exercise to stretch your hamstrings dynamically especially if you have low back pain or frequent calf strains.

Dynamic Stretch: Glute Kicks– perform this exercise if you suffer from frequent quad strains or tight hips and knees

Emily_Haglage.jpgEmily Haglage is a graduate of Saint Louis University where she received her bachelor’s of science degree in exercise science and doctorate in physical therapy. She treats a variety of orthopedic injuries with special interest in knee injuries including patellofemoral pain, meniscus injuries, ligamentous injuries, arthritis and post-operative total knee replacements. She enjoys working closely with athletes by performing Functional Sports Assessments (FSAs) which give physicians more assurance that their patients are safe to return to sports such as basketball, football, soccer, tennis and hockey.


Custom-Fitted Spine Implants

Personalized rods may improve outcomes, cut surgery time

spine_colman_storyCustom fit is the key when it comes to spinal implant rods, which an estimated 38,000 people need each year. This need is especially great for people who have a spinal deformity such as scoliosis, which causes the spine to twist and turn into complex and sometimes dangerous positions. In 2010 and 2011, an estimated 1.6 million people received treatment for scoliosis according to the Bone and Joint Initiative, a consortium of professional medical societies.

Correcting this deformity involves moving a distorted spine into a different position, which is no simple task. To accomplish it, surgeons attach metal rods to the bones surrounding the spinal column in order to support and straighten the spine.

To perform this demanding procedure, surgeons previously needed to be as much a sculptor as a physician. Over the years, they have mastered the art of cutting, bending and twisting metal rods to fit each patient.

Often, however, this manipulation may create weak spots in the rod where it can break in the future. In addition, the manipulation of the rods traditionally has been done in the operating room during surgery, adding to the time a patient spends in surgery under anesthesia.

Now, however, advances in medical imaging and implant manufacturing are making it possible to tailor an implant to the patient receiving it.

Matthew Colman, MD, has begun using patient-specific rods in reconstructive surgery — giving patients with spinal deformities implants designed to fit their anatomy perfectly. An assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at Rush University Medical Center, Colman is one of few spinal surgeons in the world who also specializes in spine cancer treatment and was one of the first doctors in Chicago to use these patient specific rods.

The customization is done in advance of the operation in cooperation with an implant manufacturer. To create the rods, Colman uploads the patient’s calibrated X-rays to a computer. Then he uses a sophisticated software program to plan the reconstructive surgical procedure.

The software allows him to simulate deformity correction and other surgical maneuvers in order to map out and determine the exact length and shape of the rod. The specifications are sent to the manufacturer, and the finished rod is delivered to Rush.

Because so much of the planning is done before surgery, less time is needed during the operation itself. “When we reduce time operating room we help to decrease the chances for infection and blood loss during surgery — and we decrease potential mistakes with the measurements,” Colman says. “In addition, manipulating the rod by hand-bending them may cause them to break more easily, which is theoretically avoided with the custom manufacturing process.”

In addition to custom-made spinal rods, Colman has also been involved in the design of patient-specific 3-D printed vertebral cages, which are used to provide anterior (frontal) support for spinal reconstructions when the area in front of the spine has been MOR300x250destroyed or removed due to infection, a tumor or trauma. The cages are in the process of receiving U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for use in the United States.

“The future of implants is in customization,” Colman says. “New technology is streamlining the process, making surgery more efficient and effective by employing faster and better working methods.”