Pedal for Life; Preventing Injury in Young Pitchers; What is SoulCycle

Episode 17.14 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:29): Dave Full is the founder of Pedal For Life, an organization he started after his great-nephew, Garrett Brockway, passed away and was an organ, eye and tissue donor. Through Garrett’s gifts of organ, eye and tissue donation, he helped 132 recipients across the country and many of his cartilage grafts through AlloSource have helped restore mobility for patients. An avid cycler, Dave rallied his cycling group and pitched the idea of riding across the country for donation awareness. The Pedal For Life team just completed their third 10-day, 1,000-mile ride for organ, eye and tissue donation.

AlloSource is one of the largest nonprofit cellular and tissue networks in the country, offering more than 200 types of precise cellular, cartilage, bone, skin and soft-tissue allografts to advance patient healing. For more than 20 years, AlloSource’s products have bridged the proven science of allografts with the advanced technology of cells, offering life-saving and life-enhancing possibilities in spine, sports medicine, foot and ankle, orthopedic, reconstructive, trauma and wound care procedures.


Segment Two(12:25): Dr. Cole and Steve talk about how to reduce throwing injuries in young pitchers.Grant Lewis

  • Young pitchers are at risk for arm injuries due to a number of factors, and pitching while fatigued is perhaps the biggest risk for injury
  • MLB’s Pitch Smart guidelines are designed to reduce injury risk while still allowing for the competitive development of the young player.
  • Parents, coaches, and league administrators would be wise to implement the Pitch Smart recommendations for their pitchers

It is important for each league to set workload limits for their pitchers to limit the likelihood of pitching with fatigue. Research has shown that pitch counts are the most accurate and effective means of doing so.

AGE DAILY MAX (PITCHES IN GAME) REQUIRED REST (PITCHES)
0 Days 1 Days 2 Days 3 Days 4 Days 5 Days
7-8 50 1-20 21-35 36-50 N/A N/A N/A
9-10 75 1-20 21-35 36-50 51-65 66+ N/A
11-12 85 1-20 21-35 36-50 51-65 66+ N/A
13-14 95 1-20 21-35 36-50 51-65 66+ N/A
15-16 95 1-30 31-45 46-60 61-75 76+ N/A
17-18 105 1-30 31-45 46-60 61-80 81+ N/A
19-22 120 1-30 31-45 46-60 61-80 81-105 106+

Segment Three (19:40): Brent Locey introduces SoulCycle and what makes it unique from other indoor cycling experiences. Brent is an instructor at SoulCycle and a NASM (National Academy of Sports Medicine) certified personal trainer and has been doing both in Chicago for over 2 years.  His first experience in the world of coaching and fitness came as a USS swimming coach and AAU/highschool basketball coach.

Take Your Journey: At SoulCycle we believe that fitness can be joyful. We climb, we jog, we sprint, we dance, we set our intention, and we break through boundaries. The best part: We do it together, as a community. Are you ready?

Change Your Body: SoulCycle is indoor cycling re-invented. Forty-five minutes is all it takes to transform the way you look and feel. Get ready for fat-burning cardio, a full-body workout (we’ve added hand weights and core work!), and choreography to work your core.

Find Your Soul: SoulCycle doesn’t just change bodies, it changes lives. With inspirational instructors, candlelight, epic spaces, and rocking music, riders can let loose, clear their heads and empower themselves with strength that lasts beyond the studio walls.

Keeping Fear out of the Game; Using Fat Tissue to Treat Joint Problems; IASTM for Treatment of Strains, Sprains & Pains

Episode 17.13 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.new host image


Segment One (01:34): Tara Hackney from Athletico Physical Therapy talks about strategies to support Psycho-social Influences during rehab. One of the consequences of injury can include fear of re-injury when the athlete returns to play. Fear can potentially be a limiting factor in rehabilitation and recovery. However, there are ways to address these psychological concerns during recovery to help athletes return to play with more confidence. Related post: Don’t Let Fear Keep You Out of the Game


Segment Two (12:34): Dr. Cole discusses new technology using patients own fat to help treat joint problems. Body fat now can help treat bone joint conditions, including injuries and osteoarthritis — the type of arthritis caused by wear and tear in tissue between joints, which affects 27 million people. A new device gently suctions, processes and uses a patient’s own fat tissue to provide a potential source of stem cells and growth factors to promote healing. Related post: Patients’ Own Fat Tissue Can Help Treat Joint Problems


Segment Three (20:50): Craig Bano, MPT, CHT from ATI Physical Therapy talks about  Instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization. IASTM has proven to be very effective in both enhancing mobility and alleviating injury, enabling pain-free participation in activities as quickly as possible. IASTM is proven to treat joint and ligament sprains, muscle and tendon strains, neck and back injuries, and tendinitis.

Research has demonstrated the ability of IASTM to:

  • Reduce pain thresholds
  • Decrease muscle guarding
  • Increase ROM
  • Increase muscle function (as well as inhibit hypertonicity)
  • Improve ligament healing
  • Decrease scarring
  • Decrease tendinitis symptoms

Related Post: A therapeutic technique to help rid you of strains, sprains and pains

Juvenile Arthritis

Juvenile arthritis is the term used to describe arthritis in children younger than 16 years. Juvenile arthritis is twice as common in girls as boys and the most common type is juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is an autoimmune disorder affecting the joints of the knee, hands and feet. It causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and feeling of warmth in the joints. The probable causes of JIA include autoimmune condition, genetic factors, and environmental factors.

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TISSUE RECIPIENT FINDS STRENGTH ONCE MORE

KATRIN, RECIPIENT OF ACHILLES TENDON ALLOGRAFT

Katrin describes her injury as affecting her life in every way. The normally active athlete was playing soccer when her ACL partially tore. Not realizing the extent of the injury, Katrin continued to play sports despite the increasing pain.

“During my first surgery, a huge piece of my medial meniscus was removed and it turned out that my ACL was completely torn. Ten months later I had to have my ACL replaced in order to prevent further injuries to my knee,” said Katrin. It was before her second surgery when Katrin realized an achilles tendon from a deceased donor would be saving her knee.

Describing  herself as “flushed with drugs,” the impact of what the doctor told her didn’t settle in until later. While recovering, Katrin was focused on healing to the best of her ability. Though she describes the process as painful, this period also gave her time to reflect on her choice of using donated tissue. “I was thinking about this a lot when I made my decision to choose a tissue transplant from a deceased donor.

“I feel grateful that tissue transplants are available and that there are people who make the decision to become a donor,” Katrin said. Three weeks after surgery, Katrin began walking without crutches. Nine weeks after that, she was able to run again. “I feel very blessed to be able to continue my active lifestyle.

There is not one day when I exercise that I am not grateful for being able to do the things that my heart desires to do such as running in the morning and snowboarding on the weekends,” said Katrin. Because of the gift she received, Katrin is now an advocate for organ and tissue donaton.

“I am a registered donor and always strongly believed that this was how I could enhance and save many people’s lives when I am no longer here,” said Katrin. Though Katrin does not know the family of her donor, she often thinks of them and hopes they know what a tremendous gift they gave her.

“I know thank you is not nearly enough to show how grateful I am for their decision to donate. I want them to know that there is not one day when I start running in the morning that I do not think about how grateful I am to be able to live life to the fullest. So again, thank you.”