Does Hip Arthroscopy Work for Hip Impingement?

Dr. Shane Nhosports medicine and hip arthroscopy specialist at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, recently published a study further proving that arthroscopic hip surgery is an effective treatment for femoroacetablular impingement (FAI), a hip condition in which the ball shaped femoral head in the hip rubs abnormally or does not permit a normal range of motion in the acetabular socket. This condition occurs most often in young to middle aged patients.dr shane nho

The study, “Hip Arthroscopic Surgery for Femoroacetabular Impingement with Capsular Management: Factors Associated With Achieving Clinically Significant Outcomes,” was published in The American Journal of Sports Medicine. It looked post-operatively at 386 patients undergoing primary hip arthroscopic surgery with routine capsular closure for FAI that had failed nonsurgical management between January 2012 and January 2014.

In this Orthopedics This Week article, he says, “The field has been evolving over the past several years and the patient selection and surgical technique has also changed. Our paper is the largest series in the literature and represents the state of the art in hip arthroscopy for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement.”


Read the entire article here.

For more information on hip arthroscopy, click here.

Motorcyclist Breaks Record after Cervical Spine Surgery by Dr. Frank Phillips

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Dave Siebert, 62, of Grayslake, IL, is up for just about any physical challenge. Two of his favorite activities are wreck diving (scuba diving among shipwrecks) and racing motorcycles which he builds himself.

With a life full of adventure and high physical demands, Dave is used to orthopedic conditions. Over the past ten years, he has undergone two hip replacements, a shoulder replacement, and a broken arm. Each of these he took in stride and has experienced successful recoveries.

However, a new, gradual pain crept into Dan’s body last spring that concerned him in a different way. He could feel the strength slowly drifting from his left hand; something he called a “frostbite” effect. He could barely hold the clutch of his motorcycle. The weakness and loss of control spread to his leg, leading him to stumble and trip. “I remember falling off a chair trying to tie my shoe,” he recalls. “That’s when I knew it was bad.”

Dave consulted his orthopedic physician who told that this time the problem was a cervical spine (neck) nerve impingement. His doctor recommended that he see a specialist, specifically Dr. Frank Phillips, director of the minimally invasive spine surgery specialty at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush.

After a visit to examine Dave and discuss his MRI, Dr. Phillips recommended a minimally invasive cervical fusion, which would eliminate his neck pain and restore his sensory perception, coordination, and balance issues.

Dave agreed to the procedure at Rush University Medical Center and was pleased to be home and walking within 48 hours.

“I didn’t like feeling unable to do something. Being able to walk was the first thing on my mind. Since I’ve had the surgery, I’ve been better and better.” As part of his healing, he focused on building strength and flexibility by practicing piano and yoga, and then swimming.

Just two months after surgery, Dave was even able to walk comfortably in his son’s wedding. Since then, he has graduated to the activities he loves most: wreck diving, building and racing motorcycles.

Just a year after surgery, Dave broke a national record: 15.3 seconds in a quarter mile race while riding a 1972 2-stroke Suzuki motorcycle that he rebuilt himself. He is thankful to be active again and is looking forward to a diving trip in Cozumel, Mexico this winter.

“Dr. Phillips really knew what he needed to do and he did it,” he explains. “It’s comforting when you have a doctor who is really on his game. I was very impressed with the whole experience.”


Learn more about minimally invasive spine surgery

After 8 Failed Surgeries, Athlete’s Foot Gets Proper Care by Dr. Lin

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Kelsie Hannigan, 17, was a typical high school student at Lincoln Way Central. She loved going shopping, hanging out with friends, and has been devoted to tumbling, gymnastics, and cheerleading since she was three years old.

While tumbling in cheer one day, Kelsie was practicing a full – a very impressive backflip with a twist – and abruptly landed on her left foot. She knew this was different from other times.

She sought advice from two or three doctors, all of whom told her to wait and see if it would heal on its own. Unfortunately, it didn’t.

One doctor diagnosed the damage as a Linsfrac fracture and agreed to perform surgery. About two weeks post-operation, however, she was still feeling severe pain in her foot and new pain in her ankle. Kelsie ended up being on and off crutches and in and out of the hospital for a year, unable to return to cheerleading, tumbling, or any physical activity. She underwent more surgeries to insert anchors, remove anchors, and repair bones.

One year and eight surgeries later, Kelsie had seen no improvement in her pain and didn’t know what to do. At this point, she had more injuries than she had started with, including recurrent popping in the lateral aspect of her ankle and chronic dislocation of her peroneal tendon.

Finally, six months after her last surgery, she discovered Dr. Johnny Lin at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush. She was initially cautious about surgery, but refreshingly hopeful about this new surgeon.

“Dr. Lin told me everything he was going to do,” she explains. “I wasn’t scared about what was going to happen. He told me all the risks and reassured me that it would be okay.”

Earlier this year, Dr. Lin performed a left ankle fibular exostectomy, hardware removal, calcaneal hardware removal, peroneal tenolysis and debridement, peroneal groove deepening, and superior peroneal retinacularplication to repair Kelsie’s foot and ankle.

Kelsie was impressed at how capable Dr. Lin was and how quickly her recovery progressed – this experience was much different than her past surgeries. She spent six weeks on crutches and two more in a boot.

“It was amazing having just one surgery,” she says. “Before, we never knew if it would be the last one. This time, even right afterward, we knew.”

Kelsie continued with six weeks of physical therapy to get stronger and to rebuild the physical stability in her foot and ankle. She has gone running a couple times but is still cautious when it comes to cheer and tumbling.

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Instead, she spends more time coaching gymnastics and tumbling for kids up to 11 years old. She has a blast teaching and is happy that she can be more involved in the physical requirements of her job.

Kelsie is relieved to be in less pain and looking forward to returning to her very active life. She is finally able to enjoy doing everyday things, such as going shopping or going out to eat with friends, that she missed out on because of severe foot and ankle pain. Less than two months post-operation, she even made it out of the boot for her mother’s wedding.

She is grateful to be progressing in recovery and returning to her life.

“Dr. Lin knew what he was talking about and knew he could make it better. He went in and fixed everything.”

Analyzing Chicago Bears Tight End Zach Miller’s Knee Injury

By Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush 

November 1, 2017

Will Chicago Bears tight end Zach Miller ever play in the NFL again?zach miller knee injury

Miller suffered one of the more gruesome injuries you will see in professional sports while trying to make a touchdown catch. Miller, a longtime NFL veteran, came down awkwardly on his left knee, suffering not only ligament damage, but also a torn popliteal artery that required emergency vascular surgery to repair.

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph and Dr. Nikhil Verma, both sports medicine orthopedic surgeons at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, joined local Chicago news affiliates to discuss Miller’s injury and what the recovery process will be like. Dr. Bush-Joseph says that the odds of Miller playing football in the NFL again are “very small.”


ABC 7 Chicago

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph sat down with ABC 7 Chicago’s Christian Farr to analyze Zach Miller’s knee injury.


FOX 32 Chicago

Dr. Nikhil Verma joined Good Day Chicago on Fox 32 Chicago to discuss Chicago Bears Zach Miller’s devastating injury to the knee.

Hear related interview with former Chicago Bear Otis Wilson in Episode 17.30