LSU ACL study aims to advance sports medicine into new era: ‘This is a big deal’

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Tight end Jamal Pettigrew stepped through footwork drills, blocked dummies, pivoted and cut through routes in the LSU indoor practice facility — standard stuff, except for one thing: Pettigrew had only surgically repaired his torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) four months before, which, according to experts, meant he’d returned to football activities nearly twice as fast as the average athlete.

A few days later, outside linebacker K’Lavon Chaisson wore sweats as he tossed around a football during pregame warmups at Kyle Field in College Station, Texas. He’d suffered a torn ACL against Miami on Sept. 2, tweeted a picture post-surgery Sept. 20, and less than two months later, tweeted a video of himself sprinting across LSU’s outdoor practice facility.

Plenty of torn ACLs with high-profile NFL athletes have played out publicly. Tom Brady. Jamaal Charles. Adrian Peterson famously returned to the Minnesota Vikings from a 2012 ACL tear in nine months — and that was widely considered unthinkable.

What was going on at LSU?

Dr. Brian Cole and Steve Kashul discuss their thoughts and opinions on this article comparing alternate ACL repair methods.

Sports Medicine Weekly on 670 The Score

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