SPORTS MEDICINE WEEKLY PARTNERS WITH CHICAGO’S PREMIER SPORTS RADIO STATION, 670 THE SCORE

Sports Medicine Weekly’, hosted by Dr. Brian Cole and Steve Kashul, is pleased to announce that 670 The Score Radio will be its new broadcast home. The show will air each Saturday from 8-9 am beginning June 2nd. ‘Sports Medicine Weekly’, in its 8th year, is the only radio program in the Midwest dedicated to the prevention and treatment of sports injuries among athletes of all levels.

‘Sports Medicine Weekly’ has produced more than 250 podcasts and published 1,200 blog posts featuring expert content about sports injuries and the most relevant fitness and nutrition trends today.

‘Sports Medicine Weekly’ has donated more than $100,000 in proceeds to the Advancement of Orthopedic Research and Cell Biology at Rush University Medical Center.

Dr. Brian Cole will serve as The Score’s sports injury expert and deliver prime time “Sports Medicine Reports” each week to promote the weekend show. He will also appear on other media outlets to offer insights regarding up-to-the-minute sports injury topics.

The Score-Sports Medicine Weekly partnership will provide opportunities across multiple platforms, with audio streaming and podcasts, to deliver access and marketing alignment with on-air personalities, content and brands.

Co-hosts Steve Kashul & Dr. Brian Cole

The Score is a 24/7 Chicago sports radio station with broadcast rights for the Chicago Cubs, Chicago Bulls, DePaul Basketball and The University of Illinois Athletics along with its sister station WBBM-News, the radio home for the Chicago Bears. As part of the Entercom national portfolio of stations, it enjoys the highest rating for Chicago Sports stations according to Artbitron and Barrett Sports Media.

As one of the two largest radio broadcasters, Entercom delivers the power of local connection on a national scale and is the #1 creator of live original, local audio content and the nation’s unrivaled leader in news and sports radio.

For more information, contact David Cole at sportsmedicineweekly@gmail.com or Theresann Seeger at theresann.seeger@gmail.com


Don’t miss Premier Episode One – Season Eight, airing Saturday, June 2nd, 2018 featuring:

Dr. James Andrews, Orthopaedic surgeon and founding partner for the AndrewsImage result for dr james andrews Institute for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. Dr. Andrews is an internationally known and respected orthopaedic surgeon with the following team affiliations:

  • Washington Redskins
  • Auburn University
  • University of Alabama
  • Troy University

Olympic Icon Dara Torres who is considered one of the greatest female competitive swimmers of all-time. She entered her first international swimming competition at age 14 and competed in her first Olympic Games a few years later in 1984. At the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing, Dara became the oldest swimmer ever to compete in the Olympic Games at age 41. She took home 3 Silver Medals, including the heartbreaking 50-meter freestyle race where she missed another Gold Medal by a mere 1/100th of a second. America has fallen in love with Dara for her astonishing accomplishments and her composure in the face of defeat.


 Brian J. Cole, M.D., M.B.A.Co-host Dr. Brian Cole discussing theories on how The NBA May Be Pushing its Tallest Players to the Point of Injury.

Once upon a time, players were assigned roles and positions based on their heights. Shorter people were supposed to shoot, pass, and dribble while those more vertically gifted were expected to lumber around the basket. This was all basketball 101.

Somewhere in recent years though, unicorns emerged and the dogma was upended. Since the advent of the NBA, the average height of players has increased from 6’3” to what it is today: 6’7”. As height as increased, the league’s skill and athleticism has also ballooned.

And so, tall players (power forwards and centers) are no longer gangly giants dependent entirely on their inches to make an impact. Now, they’re expected to be sublime and omnipotent too. But while they’re tasked to bring their A-game to the court for every game, the anatomical confines of their knees may really not be about that life.