Donor Family Shares Story of Hope; Zach Miller Knee Injury; Cheerleader Injuries

Episode 17.30 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

new host image


Segment One (01:30): The Healing Process of Donor Parents Lori and Rob Chana.

Cameron Chana (2)Cameron Chana was a born leader who focused on making an impact in lives of others. He was very involved in volunteer work, his church, and went on mission trips across the world. No matter where he was, he encouraged positivity and spread his caring, upbeat energy.

The Chana family’s world was turned upside down when twenty-two-year old Cameron was killed in a bus accident in 2009. During a time of unimaginable grief, his parents and three siblings honored his wish to be a donor.

Cameron’s legacy of hope and love lives on through the gift of organ and tissue donation. He saved five lives through organ donation and impacted as many as 50 lives through tissue donation. Learn more at AllowSource.

Lori & Rob Chana with Steve and Dr. Cole

Chana family with Cameron on the Left

Cameron’s heart recipient


Segment Two (14.12): Steve and Dr. Cole talk with former Chicago Bear Otis WilsonUSP NFL: CHICAGO BEARS AT NEW ORLEANS SAINTS S FBN NO CHI USA LA about Zach Millers horrific knee injury in the recent game against the New Orleans Saints. Chicago Bears Zach Miller had emergency surgery last week to repair a torn popliteal artery in his left leg, an injury that has resulted in amputation in some previous instances involving other football players. The 33-year-old dislocated his left knee while trying to catch a touchdown pass, which subsequently damaged the artery.


Segment Three (21:04): Dr. Kathy Weber from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush talks about the prevalence of catastrophic injuries and concussions in cheerleaders. Cheerleading is by far the most perilous sport for female athletes in high school and college, accounting for as much as two-thirds of severe school-sports injuries over the past 25 years, according to a new report. Yet cheerleading remains one of the least-regulated sports, despite more than 95,000 high school girls and 2,000 boys signing up for spirit squads nationwide each year.


kathleen weberDr. Weber’s reputation as a leading sports medicine physician is enhanced by her remarkable activity in the treatment of high-level professional athletes. She serves as the head primary care sports medicine team physician for the Chicago Bulls and the Chicago White Sox and the head team physician for the Chicago Force Women’s Football. She also serves as co-head team physician for the DePaul Blue Demons and the physician for the Hubbard Street Dance and the River North Dance Companies. In addition, she is a member of the LPGA Medical Advisory Board. She is on numerous committees including the NBA Team Physicians Executive Committee, NBA Research Committee, MLB Concussion Committee, and MLB Research Committee. Dr. Weber has been involved with the MLB Medical Advisory Board for multiple years and is the first women elected President of the MLB Team Physicians Association.