Hip Dysplasia  in Young Female Athletes; The NBA Combine; Why we were Skinnier in the 80’s

Episode 17.12 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One (01:20): Dr. Joel Williams from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush describes Hip Dysplasia, symptoms, treatment alternatives and who might be more prone to Image result for hip dysplasiahaving the condition.

Hip dysplasia, a condition where the hip socket doesn’t fully cover the ball portion of the femur, resulting in instability, is rising in young active women, who have probably had it since birth. Recent research shows that receiving care early is vital to a successful treatment experience for hip dysplasia patients.  Doing so may help patients delay or avoid having a total hip replacement (arthroplasty).

Dr. Joel C. Williams brings seven years of training and passion for complex fracture care, post-traumatic deformity, pelvis and acetabular surgery, and complex hip surgery to Rush University Medical Center.

Dr. Williams is a native of Michigan and graduated from the Michigan State University Honors Program. He then attended medical school at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. There, he was awarded a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship and spent a year doing basic science research.

Dr. Williams’ surgical training began at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, where he completed his residency in orthopedic surgery. While a resident, he did a research fellowship and was awarded a grant from the Orthopaedic Trauma Association to investigate fracture healing. Additionally, he was awarded a traveling fellowship from the AO Trauma Foundation to study orthopedic traumatology in Chur, Switzerland with Dr. Cristoph Sommer. More…

Learn more about hip disorders at Hips for Life and download the Prevention Techniques Brochure

Hips for Life


Segment Two (12:26): Dr. Cole as head team physician for the Chicago Bulls discusses the various challenges related to the NBA Draft Combine and how they are dealt with in what is described as a complicated and chaotic process.

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Segment Three (17:09): Karen Malkin from Karen Malkin Health Counseling talks about why it’s harder for adults today to maintain the same weight as those 20 to 30 years ago did, even at the same levels of food intake and exercise; how to maintain a healthy microbiome/weight and how we can avoid the obesity epidemic.

  • People are exposed to more chemicals that might be weight-gain inducing. Pesticides, flame retardants, and the substances in food packaging might all be altering our hormonal processes and tweaking the way our bodies put on and maintain weight.
  • The use of prescription drugs has risen dramatically since the ‘70s and ‘80s. Prozac, the first blockbuster SSRI, came out in 1988. Antidepressants are now one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S., and many of them have been linked to weight gain.
  • The microbiomes of Americans might have somehow changed between the 1980s and now. It’s well known that some types of gut bacteria make a person more prone to weight gain and obesity.
Karen Malkin is certified as an Integrative Health Coach and Lifestyle Practitioner and a Certified Eating Psychology Coach. Karen has a private practice in Glencoe, Illinois.  She passionately serves on the Board of Directors for the Environmental Working Group, the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Spiral Sun Ventures and Gardeneer.