Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet; Stem Cell Therapy: Myths and Misconceptions; Treatment and Prevention of “Text Neck”

Episode 16.23 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Certified Integrated Health Coach, Karen Malkin discusses the health med-dietbenefits of the Mediterranean Diet.  This anti-inflammatory diet promoted by Andrew Weil, MD, helps counteract chronic inflammation, and prevent age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Health benefits of an anti-inflammatory diet include lower LDL and total cholesterol and long-term weight loss without calorie counting. Key foods on the Mediterranean diet include 5-9 servings each day of phytonutrient containing vegetables and fruit and cooked Asian mushrooms to support immune function.

The anti-inflammatory food plan encourages fiber- rich beans and legumes; fish loaded in Omega 3’s such as wild salmon; whole soy foods such as tofu, tempeh; healthy fats such as olive oil, nuts, seeds, ground flax seed and avocados.  Of course, we can’t forget a small amount of dark chocolate and red wine, plus 2-4 cups of green tea each day, all loaded with antioxidants.


Segment Two: Dr. Cole discusses stem cell therapy and its use for elite athletes andstem-cell
the weekend warrior; definition, benefits, myths and misconceptions; the procedure and current research.

Manipulating stem cells from a patient’s bone marrow near the site of the defect in order to encourage cartilage growth and regeneration is an approach that could potentially be used to avoid surgical intervention.

Ongoing clinical trials and research efforts


Segment Three: Megan Randich, PT, DPT, ATC, Cert. MDT and Facility Manager from Athletico discusses “Text Neck”: Causes, symptoms, treatment and prevention.

"Text neck"

More teens than ever are complaining of “text neck,” or back and neck pain that can only be explained by the strain on the body caused by constant viewing of hand-held technology.

“We have teens experiencing the same shoulder, neck and back pain usually felt by people 30 years older,” said Megan Randich, a physical therapist and facility manager for Athletico in Westchester. “They shouldn’t be experiencing those issues.”

Randich said spine specialists also are seeing evidence of strain from cellphone, tablet and laptop use in high school athletes who complain that they don’t have the normal range of motion — or feel pain when trying to throw a baseball, strike a football stance or perform in other sporting activities.

More on ‘Text Neck’ article with Megan Randich plus video

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