Bone Fractures among Elite Athletes; Back-to-school: Youth Sports Injuries; Cupping Therapy

Episode 16.20 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Joel Williams, M.D.

Dr. Joel Willams

Segment One: Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph and Dr. Joel Williams from Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush discuss bone fractures among elite athletes. Dr. Joel C. Williams brings seven years of training and passion for complex fracture care, post-traumatic deformity, pelvis and acetabular surgery, and complex hip surgery to Rush University Medical Center. See related article.

Dr. Williams is a native of Michigan and graduated from the Michigan State University Honors Program. He then attended medical school at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. There, he was awarded a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship and spent a year doing basic science research.

Dr. Williams’ surgical training began at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, where he completed his residency in orthopedic surgery. While a resident, he did a research fellowship and was awarded a grant from the Orthopaedic Trauma Association to investigate fracture healing. Additionally, he was awarded a traveling fellowship from the AO Trauma Foundation to study orthopedic traumatology in Chur, Switzerland with Dr. Cristoph Sommer.


Segment Two: Steve Kashul and Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph talk about back to school-youth sports injuries. Types of injuries being seen in the office; how to minimize the risk and treat youth sports injuries.

Charles Bush-Joseph, M.D.

Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph

Long involved in the care of high school, collegiate, and recreational athletes, Dr. Bush-Joseph is the head team physician for the Chicago White Sox Major League Baseball Club and Associate Team Physician for the Chicago Bulls. Through his experience with high-profile professional athletes, Dr. Bush-Joseph was elected to the Major League Baseball Medical Advisory Board and president of the Major League Baseball Team Physician Association for 2012.

This exclusive group of team physicians advises the Major League Baseball Commissioner on medical policy and emerging trends in training and the medical care of the elite athlete. Academically, Dr. Bush-Joseph is nationally renown with leadership roles in several national orthopedic societies and president-elect of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He has authored over 140 published manuscripts and book chapters.


Segment Three: Scott Kaylor from ATI Physical Therapy discusses cupping therapy and why its been so popular with Olympic athletes; potential benefits and  patient expectations. If you watched the Olympic games, you may have spotted the spots: large, red and purple circles on the backs, shoulders, chests, arms and legs of swimmer Michael Phelps, gymnast Alex Naddour, and other top athletes. So whats the deal?

Those circles are the marks left behind by cupping, an ancient Chinese healing practiceCupping Olympic Swimmer that involves placing special cups on the skin and using heat to create suction and promote blood flow.

The red marks are due to stagnant blood and fluid that may have been stuck for a long time being brought up by the suction from deep inside the tissue so the body can flush it out. See related article.

Scott Kaylor is a board certified sports physical therapist with ATI Physical Therapy in Greenville, SC. He is a faculty member of the ATI sports and orthopedic physical therapy residency programs. Scott completed his upper extremity fellowship in 2012 spending that baseball season with the Kansas City Royals. Scott is an avid triathlete and the founder of Kaylor Endurance, an endurance athlete coaching company.