Workout Recovery; Testing for Concussion

Episode 15.05 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c.

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Segment One: Workout Recovery- how hydration, sleep and foam rolling can help

Discussion with Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, John Honcharuk, Facility Manager for Athletico in St. Charles IL. John is also Certified Functional Movement Screen Level 2, Certified Coach Precision Nutrition Level 1 and Certified MovNat Trainer. John received the Trifecta Badge award in the 2013 Spartan Obstacle Course Race and will be challenging again for 2015.


Segment Two: The King-Devick Test for fast, reliable concussion diagnosis 

Discussion with co-developer Steve Devick about The King–Devick Test (K–D Test): defined by Mosby’s Medical Dictionary as a tool for evaluation of saccade, consisting of a series of test cards of numbers. The test cards become progressively more difficult to read due to variability of spacing between the numbers. Both errors in reading and speed of reading are included in deriving a score. Saccades are quick, simultaneous movements of both eyes.

There’s No Such Thing As A Tough Brain!

The King-Devick Test is an objective remove-from-play sideline concussion screening test that can be administered by parents and coaches in minutes. The King-Devick Test is an accurate and reliable method for identifying athletes with head trauma and has particular relevance to: Football, Hockey, Soccer, Basketball, Lacrosse, Rugby, Baseball, Softball and All Other Contact and Collision Activities.
King-Devick Test is an easy-to-administer test which is given on the sidelines of sporting events to aid in the detection of concussions in athletes. King-Devick Test (K-D Test) can help to objectively determine whether players should be removed from games. As a result, King-Devick Test can help prevent the serious consequences of repetitive concussions resulting from an athlete returning to play after a head injury.